Obesity - Global Warming-deficit- Obamacare - page 5

by jaad 3,833 Views | 139 Comments

As I plan to join an (ending) obesity campaign in the near future... I'd like to bring this topic up from a different Angle. I believe obesity is one of the most important epidemics facing our country...and costing us... Read More


  1. 1
    Quote from Pudnluv
    I

    I should also say that where I live, you go five miles in any direction and you are stepping in cow manure. In these outlying areas there are no grocery stores except for maybe a small green grocer store. Prices in these stores is usually higher than the big grocery stores. While most people in the outer lying areas have transportation, they still have to drive a ways to get the store.
    Some might take that as an insult. But if there is cow manure, the soil should be fertile and gardens would flourish.

    Some might not remember, but there was a time, when everybody had a garden, and shared what they could not use. Surplus vegetables were "put up" for the winter and few went hungry.
    jaad likes this.
  2. 0
    Quote from BCgradnurse
    I live in the suburbs. It's not a big town, but there are 3 large grocery stores within a 2 mile radius. There's no public transportation, but most everyone has a car, so access to food shouldn't be an issue. It's also a solid middle class area. For most, money isn't an issue, but our town food pantry has been busier than ever this year. They only stock non-perishables, so fresh produce isn't available. Go 15 miles southeast to where I work. It's a city, composed primarily of low income families. There are 2 or 3 grocery stores in a large geographic area that are accessible by bus, but as Pud pointed out before, how much can you carry on the bus? I know many families do not have cars, as they time their appointments around the bus schedules. So, I think in certain areas transportation is a real problem. It's also a problem for the elderly in many areas. If you don't drive, don't have a friend or relative who can take you, or public transportation is unavailable or unsafe (as it can be in the city I work in-people are mugged all the time) you're limited in where you can get food. It's usually the local convenience store, which is expensive and has limited choices. Their incomes are often fixed and limited, so they're going to go with the cheapest foods. Who can blame them?
    There are very few in comparison to the majority who do own a car and can shop at walmart.

    For the low numbers who can't, It's sad they have no family to live with, and that many/most poor people would choose cigarettes over planting a garden or buying some means of transportation.

    My grandmother lived with us while I was growing up.

    It sounds like we need more businesses to open more stores and create jobs in your areas.
  3. 3
    Please show me the basis for your assumptions. You think it's very few? Come spend a day where I work and see. And that's a pretty broad assumption that most poor people choose cigarettes over vegetables. Some do, but I doubt most fall into that category. Those that live in urban areas probably have no land to plant a garden.

    Pud is right. You are clueless. And your self-righteousness is getting very hard to listen to.
    Elvish, Rose_Queen, and aknottedyarn like this.
  4. 0
    Quote from BCgradnurse
    Please show me the basis for your assumptions. You think it's very few? Come spend a day where I work and see. And that's a pretty broad assumption that most poor people choose cigarettes over vegetables. Some do, but I doubt most fall into that category. Those that live in urban areas probably have no land to plant a garden.

    Pud is right. You are clueless. And your self-righteousness is getting very hard to listen to.
    Pud said I was clueless? I guess I missed that...but if it makes you feel better to say that instead of discuss solutions, it doesn't surprise me.

    I may not have all the solutions, but I think it's much healthier to brainstorm with solutions instead of whining about what you can't do. It's no wonder people are the way they are. You get no where if you constantly worry about what you can't do and what those "bad" people are doing. This mentality is killing our country.

    What's pathetic is to try and excuse away obesity as though there are millions and millions who are obese because there are no grocery stores and they don't have cars. This is such a small amount compared to the majority.


    But here's a little-known fact. Although cigarette prices have been rising steeply for decades (they used to cost $.30 a pack in the early 1960s), mainly poor, less-educated people smoke them. According to the 2008 National Survey on Drug Use and Heath, 34 percent of those without a high school degree -- and 31 percent of those with only a high school diploma -- smoke; 14 percent of college graduates do.
    How does that work? Smoking is still a relatively inexpensive pleasure that less-educated and lower-income people are more susceptible to pursuing. In the process, as with sugary drinks (water is still, after all, less expensive) they seem less concerned about health consequences of these habits.
    Stanton Peele: Why Do Low-Income People Smoke More and Drink More Soda, but Drink Less Alcohol?


    However, understanding poverty in America requires looking behind these numbers at the actual living conditions of the individuals the government deems to be poor. For most Americans, the word “poverty” suggests near destitution: an inability to provide nutritious food, clothing, and reasonable shelter for one’s family. However, only a small number of the 46 million persons classified as “poor” by the Census Bureau fit that description. While real material hardship certainly does occur, it is limited in scope and severity.
    The following are facts about persons defined as “poor” by the Census Bureau as taken from various government reports:

    • 80 percent of poor households have air conditioning. In 1970, only 36 percent of the entire U.S. population enjoyed air conditioning.
    • 92 percent of poor households have a microwave.
    • Nearly three-fourths have a car or truck, and 31 percent have two or more cars or trucks.
    • Nearly two-thirds have cable or satellite TV.
    • Two-thirds have at least one DVD player, and 70 percent have a VCR.
    • Half have a personal computer, and one in seven have two or more computers.
    • More than half of poor families with children have a video game system, such as an Xbox or PlayStation.
    • 43 percent have Internet access.
    • One-third have a wide-screen plasma or LCD TV.
    • One-fourth have a digital video recorder system, such as a TiVo.

    For decades, the living conditions of the poor have steadily improved. Consumer items that were luxuries or significant purchases for the middle class a few decades ago have become commonplace in poor households, partially because of the normal downward price trend that follows introduction of a new product.
    Liberals use the declining relative prices of many amenities to argue that it is no big deal that poor households have air conditioning, computers, cable TV, and wide-screen TV. They contend, polemically, that even though most poor families may have a house full of modern conveniences, the average poor family still suffers from substantial deprivation in basic needs, such as food and housing. In reality, this is just not true.
    Although the mainstream media broadcast alarming stories about widespread and severe hunger in the nation, in reality, most of the poor do not experience hunger or food shortages. The U.S. Department of Agriculture collects data on these topics in its household food security survey. For 2009, the survey showed:

    • 96 percent of poor parents stated that their children were never hungry at any time during the year because they could not afford food.
    • 83 percent of poor families reported having enough food to eat.
    • 82 percent of poor adults reported never being hungry at any time in the prior year due to lack of money for food.

    Other government surveys show that the average consumption of protein, vitamins, and minerals is virtually the same for poor and middle-class children and is well above recommended norms in most cases.
    Television newscasts about poverty in America generally portray the poor as homeless people or as a destitute family living in an overcrowded, dilapidated trailer. In fact, however:

    • Over the course of a year, 4 percent of poor persons become temporarily homeless.
    • Only 9.5 percent of the poor live in mobile homes or trailers, 49.5 percent live in separate single-family houses or townhouses, and 40 percent live in apartments.
    • 42 percent of poor households actually own their own homes.
    • Only 6 percent of poor households are overcrowded. More than two-thirds have more than two rooms per person.
    • The average poor American has more living space than the typical non-poor person in Sweden, France, or the United Kingdom.
    • The vast majority of the homes or apartments of the poor are in good repair.

    By their own reports, the average poor person had sufficient funds to meet all essential needs and to obtain medical care for family members throughout the year whenever needed.
    Understanding Poverty in the United States: Poverty USA
  5. 1
    I don't have air conditioning! I don't think I ever lived in a house with it. My next house WiLL have it, though.
    jaad likes this.
  6. 0
    Quote from tntrn
    I don't have air conditioning! I don't think I ever lived in a house with it. My next house WiLL have it, though.
    And the Liberals should thank you...for saving the ozone hype
  7. 1
    Quote from jaad
    And the Liberals should thank you...for saving the ozone hype
    So perhaps this offsets all the traveling I do by jet plane and diesel motorhome.
    jaad likes this.
  8. 0
    Quote from tntrn
    I don't have air conditioning! I don't think I ever lived in a house with it. My next house WiLL have it, though.
    I've never had air conditioning either.
    Don't need it.
    Don't plan on having it unless I retire in Oklahoma.
  9. 0
    Quote from tntrn
    So perhaps this offsets all the traveling I do by jet plane and diesel motorhome.
    I don't know. Let's ask taxpayers to pay billions more to answer this. LOL
  10. 3
    I have a problem reading anything from the Heritage Foundation. I would rather read a bipartisan assessment of the poor in this country. As someone who deals with many of the poor everyday, I can tell you that most do not own a vehicle. Most of the poor apartments in the area do not have air conditioning, although some do. Some will plant a garden in the summer if they have available land and there are some community gardens. Most of the people who have all those luxuries you describe are the "newly poor", those that were doing well and suddenly lost jobs. Lets see how they are doing in a few years if no jobs become available.

    I drive through some of the worst and poorest parts of city everyday to get to work. I see the conditions that many live in. One thing I never have to worry is a lot of cars parked on the street. I know first hand what it is like to live in the city, be poor and not have a car. Running to the store because you ran out of milk is not happening. Grocery shopping becomes an ordeal. It's not as simple as running to the local Wal Mart, as the local Wal Mart is some distance away.

    While I was typing earlier, there was a story on the news about a new grocery store opening downtown. It is being stocked with fresh fruit and vegetables and lots of healthy choices. It should be noted that the neighborhood it is opening in is a very upscale neighborhood.


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