Legalizing marijuana; Cha-ching - page 9

by MunoRN 4,553 Views | 84 Comments

I was aware one benefit of legalizing marijuana was to reduce government spending on enforcement, litigation, and imprisonment, but I guess I hadn't realized the extent of potential revenue. From Washington state's expected... Read More


  1. 3
    Quote from tntrn
    yeah, yeah, yeah. but it is still federally illegal. are we testing the strength of federal laws? People can smoke it or not, I don't care...but there will be unintended consequences with this, just as there are with anything else.

    It is still federally illegal and this will be an interesting states' rights issue. We're not testing the strength of Federal laws, we're testing the strength of the Constitution, which grants rights to the states where Federal control is not beneficial.

    Nothing is consequence free. There were consequences in trying to keep it illegal and there will be consequences to making it legal, the question is which consequences are worse. (And are you getting any benefit from your actions that have consequences).
    Last edit by MunoRN on Nov 16, '12
    ktwlpn, aknottedyarn, and tewdles like this.
  2. 0
    Quote from MunoRN
    It is still federally illegal and this will be an interesting states' rights issue. We're not testing the strength of Federal laws, we're testing the strength of the Constitution, which grants rights to the states where Federal control is not beneficial.Nothing is consequence free. There were consequences in trying to keep it illegal and there will be consequences to making it legal, the question is which consequences are worse.
    no disagreement on any of that. time will tell. and ftr, i am happy the law makes it harder to skip out on a dui (on MJ) harder.
  3. 1
    Quote from MunoRN
    It is still federally illegal and this will be an interesting states' rights issue. We're not testing the strength of Federal laws, we're testing the strength of the Constitution, which grants rights to the states where Federal control is not beneficial.

    Nothing is consequence free. There were consequences in trying to keep it illegal and there will be consequences to making it legal, the question is which consequences are worse. (And are you getting any benefit from your actions that have consequences).
    It does remain illegal on a federal level...and the feds are welcome to enforce those laws in the states. However, the states are not required to enforce that law for the feds...the states get to choose how they use their law enforcement resources.

    We have years of data to demonstrate whether or not our current laws and treatment of marijuana is effective and what the consequences are of criminalization. In my opinion the data clearly supports a dramatic change in the way we view and regulate this substance. Our current efforts are expensive and ineffective in controlling public access to the drug.
    aknottedyarn likes this.
  4. 1
    The Seattle PD has posted a guide to the new law.Marijwhatnow? A Guide to Legal Marijuana Use In Seattle | SPD Blotter
    grownuprosie likes this.
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    https://apps.facebook.com/wpsocialre...0%26denied%3D1
    With his final election behind him, and the final attack ads safely off the air, President Obama now returns to his regularly scheduled programming — governing. Yet, the chatter about his second term agenda, from deficit reduction to immigration reform, ignores one critical issue: ending our nation’s inhumane, irrational — and ineffective — war on drugs.
    There are reasons to be encouraged. During the 2008 campaign, Obama pledged to leave state medical marijuana laws alone. He seemed to sympathize with the African American and Latino communities, disproportionate casualties of the drug war. Surely, Obama knew that one chance run-in between his youthful “choom gang” and the police years ago would have deprived him of the office he holds today.
    In October 2009, the DOJ declared that the federal government would not prosecute individuals, including distributors and cultivators, found in possession of marijuana, as long as they were complying with state medical marijuana laws.

    Too many people are branded as criminals because they had some pot. We see some much wasted energy going after those who are involved in the marijuana trade.
    Incarceration has proven to not work and yet we continue to do the same thing and have the same results. We jail more people and label them so they have even a more difficult time getting jobs in the future.

    One of my jobs is to assist people who want their records expunged. So many times there are pot charges that stand in the way of job advancement. None of us are perfect. Yes, they broke the laws and got caught. How long must they pay for that mistake? If I speed and get caught it does not hang over my head forever. I broke the law, and one that is there for public safety. Yet we accept that. Pot use is not nearly as great a public safety danger as those who text and drive, those who speed, those who break other traffic laws. We treat these as infractions and yet know they kill many people each year.

    Our DUI laws are very strict, and I think that is wise. Cars kill. In general, pot does not.

    It is time to show mercy for those who have broken the law with pot use and find a better way. We cannot afford to incarcerate everyone who breaks a law. Let's prioritize better.
    tewdles and ktwlpn like this.


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