House Votes To Overturn Obama Rule Restricting Gun Sales To The Severely Mentally Ill - page 6

According to NPR's Susan Davis, the measure being blocked from implementation would have required the Social Security Administration to send records of some beneficiaries with severe mental... Read More

  1. by   toomuchbaloney
    Quote from PMFB-RN
    Can you ask this another way? I'm not at all sure what you are asking me for with this.
    It was tongue in cheek because whining about not trusting the government is a sad and tired excuse for doing exactly nothing to even attempt to address our health crisis related to gun injuries and deaths in this country.
    Last edit by toomuchbaloney on Apr 4
  2. by   Avid reader
    Quote from MunoRN
    I would have to agree that we haven't necessarily exhausted every reasonable option for how to reduce the unnecessary dangers of guns. Only about half the states have laws that impose punishments for failing to secure guns from children. Securing guns properly, which I consider to be a basic responsibility of guns ownership, has been shown to reduce gun accidents among children and to reduce gun theft which then reduces the flow of guns into the black market. These sorts of measures don't restrict legal ownership or use of guns, but have a clear benefit, which generally helps protect gun freedoms.
    So why reinvent the wheel?


    So, America, this is how other countries do gun control | US news | The Guardian


    Take what's applicable. Why the low numbers? No manufacturers with lobbyists influencing the lawmakers.
  3. by   margin261
    Quote from elkpark
    So the question is still what would you consider an acceptable number of children to be killed each year in accidental shootings?
    Elkpark- If you will go back a page you will see I did answer your question and apologized for how I phrased my post.

    I'm not quite sure why you would choose to interpret my original post the way you did- but as it is difficult to ascertain tone, inflection, etc from reading text, people tend to misinterpret quite a bit.

    I think there are too many accidental gun deaths period. Not just children, teenagers & adults too. And although I own many guns & enjoy shooting them, I think the gun laws are too lax. I think many people who own guns don't handle them properly or teach their children proper handling- hence all the accidental gun deaths.

    But as long as powerful & wealthy lobbyists are allowed to line politicians pockets, we will not get any common sense gun legislation. That goes for other industries as well, not just guns.

    I'm still trying to think of a way I could've worded my previous post so that the sentence flow/structure was appropriate but didn't send the message that it's ok for a few kids to be killed off every year. Maybe I'll do better next time.
  4. by   PMFB-RN
    Quote from MunoRN
    I would have to agree that we haven't necessarily exhausted every reasonable option for how to reduce the unnecessary dangers of guns. Only about half the states have laws that impose punishments for failing to secure guns from children. Securing guns properly, which I consider to be a basic responsibility of guns ownership, has been shown to reduce gun accidents among children and to reduce gun theft which then reduces the flow of guns into the black market. These sorts of measures don't restrict legal ownership or use of guns, but have a clear benefit, which generally helps protect gun freedoms.
    Exactly.
  5. by   PMFB-RN
    Quote from toomuchbaloney
    It was tongue in cheek because whining about not trusting the government is a sad and tired excuse for doing exactly nothing to even attempt to address our health crisis related to gun injuries and deaths in this country.
    "Whining"
    Really? OK then.
  6. by   PMFB-RN
    Quote from Avid reader
    So why reinvent the wheel?


    So, America, this is how other countries do gun control | US news | The Guardian


    Take what's applicable. Why the low numbers? No manufacturers with lobbyists influencing the lawmakers.
    I'll tell you why the numbers are lower. The UK, Japan, Germany, and Australia (the countries used for comparison in the article) are highly secular socities, unlike the USA. America is among the most devoutly religious first world nations.
    It's obvious when one looks at the world today, that more religion = more violence. America has been at war for most of its history, and is currently in two shooting wars.
    In the world today there are 10 conflicts that kill >1000 people/year. Every one of them is in a highly devout country. That is not to say that these are religious wars. For example the Mexican government's war aginst drug cartels is one of these conflicts that kills >1000/people a year. That is certainly not a religious war, but like every other conflict in the world, is being fought by and among a devoutly religious society.
    As we learned in Oklahoma City in 1995, Americans will continue to slaughter each other, and others around the world, regardless of the tools available. It's what we do, and will continue to do until we eventually (hopefully) join with the more advanced nations.
    Also, 3D printing will soon render gun regulations obsolete.
  7. by   elkpark
    Quote from margin261
    Elkpark- If you will go back a page you will see I did answer your question and apologized for how I phrased my post.
    I did see that, and I was one of the people who "liked" your response. I was posing the same question to a different poster, as you can see from the quote in my post.

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