HB 2950 in Texas: It's ok to discriminate. Also, where is your husband, woman? - page 2

The whole article is here: With All Eyes On Trump, Texas May Soon Pass Horrific Anti-LGBTQ Laws The part that really caught my attention: "Getting less attention, however, are the insidious... Read More

  1. by   ~Mi Vida Loca~RN
    Quote from Kooky Korky
    Devil's advocate here - suppose someone really does believe homosexuality is a sin and that it does
    violate that person's religious views to treat homosexual persons. What about the sins of gluttony,
    murder, and lots of other sins? Maybe someone has a problem treating these sinners, too. Now what?

    Recall the pharmacists who believe it violates their religious beliefs to sell the morning after pill and
    refused to sell it. I think it's OTC now, so no more issues with it.

    Whose rights and beliefs get priority?

    Suppose a woman has no husband. She's a widow, divorcee, never married, husband is overseas and
    not reachable. Is her father or her brother her head? Does this rule treat her like a child or does it "only"
    take away her right to privacy? (Please note the parentheses, indicating that I think her right to privacy
    should not be violated).

    As a very new nurse in the OR, I thought we were doing D & C's. Guess what they really were (abortions) -
    according to a fellow nurse, who mentioned it several months after I'd participated in more than a few.
    I am very angry to think I was not informed and was not asked if I would be OK doing them.
    I am usually all for looking at the other side of things, in fact I will argue for the other side even if it's not my personal belief on it. However, I can't get on board with this because it is now directly affecting patient care based on our own moral compass. You choose to pick a profession where you take care of patients, all patients from a variety of backgrounds and cultures. The patient is the ones who's rights gets priority; they are after all who you are there for. Where does it end?? I don't agree with addiction so I refuse to Narcan the patient and they just die?? Or maybe I feel overweight people brought it on themselves so I won't be taking care of them either?? Teenage mother, unwed mother, nurse doesn't agree and just doesn't provide care?? The list can go on and on. We don't base our patient care off of our own moral compass. If you want to be able to pick and choose patients and procedures that go along with your own personal cultural beliefs then you find a private practice that follows your beliefs or you find a different profession.
  2. by   Texas Joe
    I am a retired nurse, LVN, and also a Christian. This discrimination has gotten out of hand. Nurses become nurses to help people. If a person is a nurse and refuses to serve an LGBT member due to religious reasons then they need to find a new career. And as a Christian they are a disgrace to God and their fellow Christians. A Christian is called on by God to humble themselves and be a servant. And if a Christian is a nurse, a job by very the things we do, is a very service oriented job. A Christian nurse has the opportunity to be a shining example. By their service to others who are ill they can be the "city on a hill" or "the light on a lamp stand." For some reason some of my fellow Christians in all walks of work feel that to refuse to serve a member of the LGBT community that they are a light or a city, but they are not. By their refusal they have not only placed their light "under a bushel basked' but buried it. They have torn down that "city on a hill" and replaced it with ruins. As nurses we don't get to discriminate.
    Hopefully the amendment to the Occupation Code 301 will not pass. I did find the proposed amendment but not on the state site. It is full of legal talk.
  3. by   Meeshie
    On the "and where is your husband, woman?" piece of this....

    Years ago my MIL decided to have her tubes tied. Her husband had died, she was raising a child by herself, she no longer wished to have more children and she was juggling a new career. She went to the doctor to arrange it and they said they needed her husband's permission. Her husband was deceased, she explained. They then told her, a grown woman with a child, that she would have to bring in her father to sign permission paperwork or they would not do it.

    This wasn't that long ago, honestly. Early 1980s in Florida.
  4. by   Texas Joe
    Okay. Just saw reference to this Texas amendmedt scrolling on CNN
  5. by   Oregon, My Oregon
    Quote from Meeshie
    They then told her, a grown woman with a child, that she would have to bring in her father to sign permission paperwork or they would not do it.

    This wasn't that long ago, honestly. Early 1980s in Florida.
    This fills me with rage.
  6. by   VaccineQueen
    Quote from Meeshie
    On the "and where is your husband, woman?" piece of this....

    Years ago my MIL decided to have her tubes tied. Her husband had died, she was raising a child by herself, she no longer wished to have more children and she was juggling a new career. She went to the doctor to arrange it and they said they needed her husband's permission. Her husband was deceased, she explained. They then told her, a grown woman with a child, that she would have to bring in her father to sign permission paperwork or they would not do it.

    This wasn't that long ago, honestly. Early 1980s in Florida.
    In 2013 when one of my friends donated her eggs to pay for nursing school she had to have her husband's permission to do so. This was also in Florida.

    2013.
  7. by   prmenrs
    If I was asked "Where is your husband, woman!", my response would be: do I have any volunteers??

    It seems like we have some real dunces emerging from their caves, lately.
  8. by   ~Mi Vida Loca~RN
    Provider: "Where is your husband woman??"

    Me: "Buried in the backyard after muttering the words, listen to me woman I am your husband"
  9. by   sideshowstarlet
    If this bill passes, I fully intend to declare all unpleasant tasks as "against my religion." Oh, it's my turn to take the patient whose family member "fired" the last 37 nurses, 52 aides, and one doctor from caring for her mom? "It's against my religion! In excelsis deo!!!" Code brown! Code brown! "Not on the Sabbath!"

    Because, apparently, we can do that. I love how Republicans, the party which traditionally supports businesses being independent of government interference, supports the government intervening in a board made up of professional nurses and is, in essence, telling them how to judge nursing competency and fitness to practice.
  10. by   TriciaJ
    Quote from hppygr8ful
    HB2950 - You can download any bill and read it in full on several government websites. I would not be surprised of Texas included a religious beliefs clause - however I doubt it would go so far as the HIPAA violation cited. You all ever heard of "Fake News"

    Hppy
    I double-check anything that makes me feel instantly outraged. That's my clue that something is BS. I just heard Trump being blamed on the news for the terrorist attack in London. I really hope he doesn't get mad enough to cause an asteroid to strike the earth.
  11. by   Kooky Korky
    Quote from Meeshie
    Looking at what they're trying to do.... it looks like the bill amendment is directed at controlling the BON and their ability to police certain actions. It would allow nurses to claim "religious causes" if they do something that would violate nursing ethics thus escaping punishment or loss of license. That's broad as hell and it could do a lot or nothing depending on how it ends up being used. It would certainly protect patient abandonment, for example. "I can't care for this person because my god says so" which.. yeah. On the other hand the amendment is directed at the BON and not at criminal legislation so it doesn't protect from violating federal laws if they are prosecuted on a federal level.

    The pharmacist one exists in other states. It allows pharmacists to go with their own beliefs in what drugs they will or won't give out. It came into existence elsewhere when the morning after pill hit the market because Christian pharmacists were in an uproar that they'd have to violate their beliefs. I suppose you could also apply that to drugs for transitioning or for anything else that anyone decided was immoral.

    None of this is shocking because its Texas... which is very very very well known for its issues, lets be honest.
    It might not have been only Christian pharmacists.

    And probably a lot of Chrisitian pharmacists would figure it was the lesser of evils - prevent an unwanted pregnancy or force a woman to be pregnant against her will and force a child who is the product of rape to live.

    No offense is meant to anyone who has ever been involved in a situation like this. I know this is a delicate subject and someone is bound to take offense where none is intended at all.

    I know nothing about Texas and its issues, sorry.
    Last edit by Kooky Korky on May 22
  12. by   Kooky Korky
    Quote from VaccineQueen
    In 2013 when one of my friends donated her eggs to pay for nursing school she had to have her husband's permission to do so. This was also in Florida.

    2013.
    Was her father alive? Demented? What if she didn't even know who her father was? What if he had been a convicted felon? Child molester? Rapist? Or otherwise not around or not qualified in the eyes of anyone with even a smidgeon of gray matter?

    Old habits and old attitudes die awfully hard.

    You've come a long way, baby.
  13. by   Ruby Vee
    Quote from Meeshie
    On the "and where is your husband, woman?" piece of this....

    Years ago my MIL decided to have her tubes tied. Her husband had died, she was raising a child by herself, she no longer wished to have more children and she was juggling a new career. She went to the doctor to arrange it and they said they needed her husband's permission. Her husband was deceased, she explained. They then told her, a grown woman with a child, that she would have to bring in her father to sign permission paperwork or they would not do it.

    This wasn't that long ago, honestly. Early 1980s in Florida.
    In the late 70s in Wisconsin, I wanted to have a JC Penney's card. It was the only store in town, and they were offering great deals on kitchen stuff if you had a credit card, and I was newly married and needed kitchen stuff. I wasn't allowed to get the credit card without my husband's signature, even though I was supporting him.

    When I eventually divorced him, I had to have my father's signature to get a MasterCard.

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