Donald Trump Celebrates Black History Month - page 3

Donald Trump Celebrates Black History Month by Recognizing Soldier Who Saved American Flag - Breitbart... Read More

  1. by   nursej22
    If the African Americans that DJT honors are all people he personally knows, what will he do for March, Women's History Month!?!
  2. by   Lil Nel
    Quote from nursej22
    If the African Americans that DJT honors are all people he personally knows, what will he do for March, Women's History Month!?!
    Oh, I hope so! That means he will honor the 16 women that he has sexually assaulted/harassed.
  3. by   itsybitsy
    Quote from nursej22
    As I said previously, I think DJT should recognize people who are currently standing up for inequality, not just the people he has or has had a personal relationship with.
    Do you not think there is inequality in this country? If you do, how?

    Recognition doesn't have to be given in the form of an award. It can be a promotion, a shout out, or an endorsement. Just because these people weren't at the forefront for civil rights doesn't mean they don't fight for inequality. They don't need to virtue signal to stand up to inequality. Not all stances against injustices are in the spotlight.

    Tell me why you think these people don't stand up for inequality.
  4. by   elkpark
    Quote from Lil Nel
    Oh, I hope so! That means he will honor the 16 women that he has sexually assaulted/harassed.
    Nah, he claims he he's never met some of them, even though there are photos that indicate otherwise.
  5. by   nursej22
    Quote from itsybitsy
    Do you not think there is inequality in this country? If you do, how?

    Tell me why you think these people don't stand up for inequality.
    Of course there is inequality.

    I think when people stand up to inequality, they make themselves heard even when there is the chance that it may not be popular, or even to risk arrest, as Rosa Parks did.

    Colin Kaepernick comes to mind, you know, the guy that DJT called an SOB.

    As for you question about standing up for inequality, a) I don't understand what you are asking, and b) its is almost impossible to prove a negative.
  6. by   itsybitsy
    Quote from Lil Nel
    I'm going to make it real easy for you, itsy bitsy, here is what John Lewis thinks of the Bum, aka DJT.
    And John Lewis is not MLK Jr. He can act like he would know what MLK Jr. would stand for, but it will never be legitimized. Just read about MLK Jr.'s family, they DON'T think the same way Lewis does, in what MLK Jr. would have done/thought, so you can't speak for someone else, because you will never truly know.

    Quote from Lil Nel
    Lewis also said that he will not attend Trump's inauguration, and that it will be the first one he's missed since his election to Congress in 1986.

    This is from the Huffington Post, January 2017. I had to cut and paste because the link wouldn't work.
    Well, I guess HuffPost isn't the most though in checking their interviewees claims, considering a quick search revealed Lewis boycotted George W Bush's inauguration too. He also said the same thing about Bush, that Lewis did not think Bush was the "true elected President", which is what he said about Trump. Seems like he just doesn't like Republican Presidents...

    Speaking of Republicans, there is a large amount of evidence MLK Jr. was a Republican, all the while in the 1960's, the Democrat President Kennedy, wire-tapped MLK Jr., voted against the Civil Rights Act, and opposed the March on Washington, which was organized by the Republican Phillip Randolph.

    Likewise, during MLK Jr.'s time, Democrats Al Gore Sr. and Robert Byrd (remember, Hillary Clinton's mentor), opposed repealing segregation.

    I thought we were suppose to judge a person based on the content of their character, not by the color of their skin. Why is the recognition of black people only relevant now? Why is it not asked upon to recognize whites, asians, or hispanics on their fights for inequality?

    So, in line with MLK Jr.'s history on the various topics, it seems to me he would lean the exact opposite of Lewis. Additionally, I think MLK Jr. would have gave resounding applause for ANYONE who was able to maintain low black unemployment; it seems the Black Caucus didn't think the same.

    You, in particular, could learn a thing or two from MLK Jr. - "Hate cannot drive out hate; only love can do that".
  7. by   itsybitsy
    Quote from nursej22
    Of course there is inequality.

    I think when people stand up to inequality, they make themselves heard even when there is the chance that it may not be popular, or even to risk arrest, as Rosa Parks did.

    Colin Kaepernick comes to mind, you know, the guy that DJT called an SOB.

    As for you question about standing up for inequality, a) I don't understand what you are asking, and b) its is almost impossible to prove a negative.
    I'm asking you to state what inequality there is.

    How do you know these people are not standing up for inequality, but it's not reported on? How do you know they don't attend committees on inequality? Do they HAVE to protest to show they are fighting? Do they HAVE to make the news to show they are fighting? Just because they aren't fighting inequalities in they way you perceive they should, doesn't mean they aren't doing so.

    No one has said Kaepernick shouldn't stand up for inequality, if he sees it. People debate his way of doing so, by protesting the National Anthem. If he would have used his platform do say exactly what he is thinking, about the inequalities he sees, it would have been just as effective, without disrespecting his country, flag, and anthem. Out of ALL people fighting social justices, Kaepernick was in the BEST position to truly say something, that would have reached millions, instead he chose to be disrespectful to do it.
  8. by   herring_RN
  9. by   elkpark
    Quote from itsybitsy
    And John Lewis is not MLK Jr. He can act like he would know what MLK Jr. would stand for, but it will never be legitimized. Just read about MLK Jr.'s family, they DON'T think the same way Lewis does, in what MLK Jr. would have done/thought, so you can't speak for someone else, because you will never truly know.
    Which means the same is true of Dr. King's family -- they can't truly know what he would think, and can't speak for him any more that Rep. Lewis can.

    Quote from itsybitsy
    Well, I guess HuffPost isn't the most though in checking their interviewees claims, considering a quick search revealed Lewis boycotted George W Bush's inauguration too. He also said the same thing about Bush, that Lewis did not think Bush was the "true elected President", which is what he said about Trump. Seems like he just doesn't like Republican Presidents...
    It's not a matter of "liking" Republican presidents or not. Both Bush and Trump were put in office under a cloud of suspicion. Bush was not elected, he was placed in office by the Republicans on the Supreme Court in a blatantly partisan decision. Trump lost the popular vote by a large margin but squeaked by in the Electoral College in an election that was already known during the campaign to have been influenced to some degree by outside actors. Trump may not like it, but there will always be questions about the legitimacy of his presidency, more so each day as more information comes out about the degree to which the Russians interfered in the election.

    Quote from itsybitsy
    Speaking of Republicans, there is a large amount of evidence MLK Jr. was a Republican.
    No, there isn't, although many in the GOP cling to this fabrication.

    Indeed, the Internet is replete with declarations from conservative groups that King was a brethren Republican. The claim rests, in large part, on comments made at least eight years ago by Alveda C. King, the civil rights leader's niece.

    "My uncle, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., during his lifetime was a Republican," Alveda King said in a video posted on the National Black Republican Association website.

    Her statement has been dismissed by other members of King's family. "It is disingenuous to imply that my father was a Republican," Martin Luther King III, the civil rights leader's son, told The Associated Press in 2008. "He never endorsed any presidential candidate, and there is certainly no evidence that he ever even voted for a Republican."

    And on the same day Van Cleave made his statement, Bernice King, the civil rights leader's daughter, said in a radio interview that her father was "never" a member of the Republican Party.

    The video of Alveda King's comments has been circulating for years. But in 2013, she retracted her claim in an op-ed for Newsmax.com, a conservative news website. King wrote that she regrets "having said to a group of peers that my Uncle M. L. (Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.) was a Republican. I said that without having all the facts."

    Alveda King wrote that her uncle was "an independent, who in his own words tended to vote Democrat."


    Van Cleave wrongly says Martin Luther King Jr. was a Republican | PolitiFact Virginia

    And more documentation:

    No, Martin Luther King Jr. was not a Republican - but here's what he had to say about them – ThinkProgress

    Debunking the biggest myths about MLK - CNN

    Houston group says Martin Luther King Jr. was a Republican | PolitiFact Texas
  10. by   herring_RN
    Quote from itsybitsy
    I'm asking you to state what inequality there is.

    How do you know these people are not standing up for inequality, but it's not reported on? How do you know they don't attend committees on inequality? Do they HAVE to protest to show they are fighting? Do they HAVE to make the news to show they are fighting? Just because they aren't fighting inequalities in they way you perceive they should, doesn't mean they aren't doing so.

    No one has said Kaepernick shouldn't stand up for inequality, if he sees it. People debate his way of doing so, by protesting the National Anthem. If he would have used his platform do say exactly what he is thinking, about the inequalities he sees, it would have been just as effective, without disrespecting his country, flag, and anthem. Out of ALL people fighting social justices, Kaepernick was in the BEST position to truly say something, that would have reached millions, instead he chose to be disrespectful to do it.
    I have observed many many instances when a nurse stated to an executive, visitor or physician who is harassing an employee, "That is inappropriate."
    Sometimes the person appropriately apologized and/or stopped the behavior.
    Rarely the person denies doing what others observed such as snapping the bra strap of a nursing assistant, talking about details of a sexual act, or "accidentally" touching a breast or buttocks outside clothing or calling a worker names such as "stupid" or "Fat and ugly".
  11. by   itsybitsy
    Quote from elkpark
    Which means the same is true of Dr. King's family -- they can't truly know what he would think, and can't speak for him any more that Rep. Lewis can.
    Exactly, that's what I was saying. His family says otherwise, but we will never truly know.

    Quote from elkpark
    It's not a matter of "liking" Republican presidents or not. Both Bush and Trump were put in office under a cloud of suspicion. Bush was not elected, he was placed in office by the Republicans on the Supreme Court in a blatantly partisan decision. Trump lost the popular vote by a large margin but squeaked by in the Electoral College in an election that was already known during the campaign to have been influenced to some degree by outside actors. Trump may not like it, but there will always be questions about the legitimacy of his presidency, more so each day as more information comes out about the degree to which the Russians interfered in the election.
    If their Presidencies weren't legitimate, why are/were they Presidents? Obviously there is a process, that is followed EVERY election. It's painful to watch many people be happy-go-lucky when their candidate wins, but suddenly claim the electoral college and other voting processes are illegitimate when their candidate loses. It is actually disheartening what happened to Bernie Sanders, where in that instance, I do think something funky was happening.

    Quote from elkpark
    No, there isn't, although many in the GOP cling to this fabrication.
    Likewise, so many also state he was a Democrat. But all of the things occurring around him, it makes me think he was either an independent or a Republican. I think it was highly unlikely he was a Democrat at that time. Now? I might think he would be a Democrat, mostly by peer pressure.

    It's actually quite strange the amount of opposition on that one post. So many links, so little cares.
  12. by   itsybitsy
    Quote from herring_RN
    I have observed many many instances when a nurse stated to an executive, visitor or physician who is harassing an employee, "That is inappropriate."
    Sometimes the person appropriately apologized and/or stopped the behavior.
    Rarely the person denies doing what others observed such as snapping the bra strap of a nursing assistant, talking about details of a sexual act, or "accidentally" touching a breast or buttocks outside clothing or calling a worker names such as "stupid" or "Fat and ugly".
    Uh, what? What are you talking about?
  13. by   elkpark
    Quote from itsybitsy
    But all of the things occurring around him, it makes me think he was either an independent or a Republican. I think it was highly unlikely he was a Democrat at that time. Now? I might think he would be a Democrat, mostly by peer pressure.
    From the CNN article I linked above:

    Even before he became a civil rights leader, King was thinking deeply of economics, not just race.

    In a letter familiar to scholars, King tells his future wife, Coretta Scott, that he welcomes the day when "there will be a nationalization of industry ... and a better distribution of wealth."

    In the letter, dated July 18, 1952, King writes:

    "I imagine you already know that I am much more socialistic in my economic theory than capitalistic."


    Remind me of when the Republican party embraced socialism? Was that back in the 1950s and '60s??

    Quote from itsybitsy
    If their Presidencies weren't legitimate, why are/were they Presidents? Obviously there is a process, that is followed EVERY election. It's painful to watch many people be happy-go-lucky when their candidate wins, but suddenly claim the electoral college and other voting processes are illegitimate when their candidate loses.
    Explain that to all the right-wing "birthers" who've spent the last decade or so claiming that Obama's presidency was illegitimate. Apparently, we're allowed to think whatever we like about the legitimacy of individual presidents. Whether you like to admit it or not, there are legitimate questions about the presidencies of Bush and Trump, unlike the objections to Obama's presidency, which are pure and simple racism.

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