A Day Without a Woman

  1. Across the nation, as a follow up to the Women's March on Washington, women are striking from work tomorrow (March 8, 2017), not shopping and/or wearing red. In my area, schools have had to close because of the number of call-outs and leave requests.

    I'm scheduled to work tomorrow and have no idea how I could take off and not risk my job.

    Is anyone participating by striking and taking off?

    I don't know if any working nurse would be able to strike for political reasons and not suffer serious repercussions.

    If you are participating , please share how you are doing it.
    •  
  2. Poll: Are you participating by:

    • Striking/calling-out?

      0% 0
    • Not shopping or spending?

      33.33% 2
    • Wearing red?

      50.00% 3
    • All three?

      0% 0
    • not participating in any way?

      16.67% 1
    6 Votes
  3. 14 Comments

  4. by   BCgradnurse
    I can't take the day off, but I will be wearing red (no pink,sorry Far) and not spending money.
  5. by   StarBrownRN
    I'm in the same boat. I can't take off work. All I can do is not spend/shop.

    Speaking with some co-workers, it was brought up that if nurses strike it's viewed as selfish--not as a political expression. Seemingly, nurses have been painted into a corner. Whenever we advocate for ourselves, we are viewed as greedy or selfish; so our rights are not recognized because we don't want to risk being viewed in that light.

    Women comprise over 90% of the nursing workforce. If nurses participate in "A Day Without Women," the results would be catastrophic for our entire nation and, I believe, the nation would not forgive the nursing profession for such. Even though such actions are within our rights.
  6. by   Davey Do
    A day without a woman would be like a day without sunshine.

    Dark.

    Well, since I'm not scheduled to work tomorrow, don't have many red pieces of clothing apparel, bigod, I'll show my support!
  7. by   elkpark
    The poll doesn't allow me to choose both wearing red and not shopping/spending (the "all three" option doesn't work for me, since I'm not calling off from work), but that's what I'm doing. I'll also be wishing people a happy International Woman's Day all day!

    I always recall, on March 8, many decades ago when I was a young woman and had never heard of International Woman's Day. I was a member of the NOW chapter in my city, and some of the members proposed us doing some kind of event for IWD. The entire concept was a new idea to most of us (I was certainly not the only member who hadn't heard of IWD), but the chapter got busy (we started months in advance, of course) and put together an evening event for the public. We invited the real "Norma Rae" (on whom the movie was based), who lived in our state (where the events in the film had taken place) as our keynote speaker and she came (it was thrill to meet her!), we had refreshments, and we inaugurated our local "Woman of the Year" award (a local educator who did a lot of advocacy work for public education and kids in the city was the first recipient). It was a nice evening, but I still didn't see the point, and I was still suspicious of the entire "International Women's Day" concept (I sincerely suspected the other members of the group might have made it up, or, at least, it was some kind of obscure, fringe "holiday" that no one really took seriously). Some of the local TV stations sent crews to cover the event, so we rushed home after it was done to see if we made it onto the 11:00 news. When I got home and turned on the TV, I found that the 11:00 news that night was all coverage of IWD events that had been happening all over the world -- hundreds of thousands of women had marched in Paris and in cities in South America; thousands of women had marched in Iran and Iraq, demanding their rights and freedoms (actually putting themselves in danger by doing so); women all over the world had been demonstrating for equal rights and freedom. This was an amazing revelation for me (I'm getting a little verklempt just recalling it while I'm typing) -- I prided myself on being a feminist at the time, but I had no idea that IWD was a real thing and such a big deal around the world. Now, I always try to talk it up and educate others.

    Happy International Women's Day!!
  8. by   Avid reader
    Starbrown, and that's the Catch 22 situation that prevents nurses from progressing. Enhanced empathy and sympathy levels. As stated before, we need male nurses to advocate for us. That's their forte' anyway. As we employ lawyers to do our dirty work, we need to push male nurses to represent us. They actually enhance their reputation by being strident, we would be described far more colourfully
  9. by   herring_RN
    Quote from Avid reader
    Starbrown, and that's the Catch 22 situation that prevents nurses from progressing. Enhanced empathy and sympathy levels. As stated before, we need male nurses to advocate for us. That's their forte' anyway. As we employ lawyers to do our dirty work, we need to push male nurses to represent us. They actually enhance their reputation by being strident, we would be described far more colourfully
    I disagree. Nurses can be strong, honest, and successful.
    Thousands of us. Young and seasoned regardless of gender realized we wanted the best for out patients.
    We did it for out patients while knowing we had to tale care of ourselves so we could care for them. If you want to start learning how thousands of nurses, mostly women, succeeded in achieving safe staffing ratios thus saving lives of hospital patients in our state. All while improving working conditions of those who came to California hospital nursing after 2004 please read the links and watch the video:
    Nurses 12 year campaign for safe staffing ratios:
    http://www.nationalnursesunited.org/...fight-0104.pdf

    RATIOS: THE ANATOMY OF A GOOD BILL
    RATIOS: The Anatomy of a Good Bill | National Nurses United

    Ratios Booklet:
    http://nurses.3cdn.net/f0da47b347e41bb03a_z1m6vl1sd.pdf

    Most of us volunteer to donate money for political activities such as the ratio campaign. We employ attorneys who work for nurses.
    On page 12 of the following link a brilliant kind attorney who I've never known to lie mentioned"
    ... "CNA attorney Jane Lawhon filed twocomplaints against Saint John’s on behalf ofthe nurses last week...."
    http://backissues.smdp.com/041311.pdf
  10. by   elkpark
    Quote from Avid reader
    As stated before, we need male nurses to advocate for us. That's their forte' anyway. As we employ lawyers to do our dirty work, we need to push male nurses to represent us. They actually enhance their reputation by being strident, we would be described far more colourfully
    I not only disagree with this idea, I find it offensive. In nursing, or in any other aspect of life, I have never needed men to "advocate for" or "represent" me.
  11. by   toomuchbaloney
    In a civil society we each should advocate for others. In an uncivil society (like ours) we must advocate for one another.
  12. by   Farawyn
    Quote from elkpark
    I not only disagree with this idea, I find it offensive. In nursing, or in any other aspect of life, I have never needed men to "advocate for" or "represent" me.
    Quote from toomuchbaloney
    In a civil society we each should advocate for others. In an uncivil society (like ours) we must advocate for one another.
    I was talking to a male friend the other day who didn't get why we needed a Women's Month to raise awareness. He said, if you want equality, there should be a Men's Month, too.

    Ummmm...
    My answer was, we need to do what we can UNTIL we are considered equal.

    I have been quite vocal about this on FB, and it has cost me "friends'- mostly women, which, hey. Good Riddance.
  13. by   Rose_Queen
    Far, it's the exact same when it's gay pride month. I've heard people asking when straight pride month is. They just don't get it.
  14. by   Farawyn
    Quote from Rose_Queen
    Far, it's the exact same when it's gay pride month. I've heard people asking when straight pride month is. They just don't get it.

    Looking for a broken heart emoji.
    I know. And that's why I don't care if Trumpettes want to disown me. Why would I want a friend like that?
  15. by   Spidey's mom
    Quote from herring_RN
    I disagree. Nurses can be strong, honest, and successful.
    Thousands of us. Young and seasoned regardless of gender realized we wanted the best for out patients.
    We did it for out patients while knowing we had to tale care of ourselves so we could care for them. If you want to start learning how thousands of nurses, mostly women, succeeded in achieving safe staffing ratios thus saving lives of hospital patients in our state. All while improving working conditions of those who came to California hospital nursing after 2004 please read the links and watch the video:
    RATIOS: THE ANATOMY OF A GOOD BILL
    RATIOS: The Anatomy of a Good Bill | National Nurses United

    Ratios Booklet:
    http://nurses.3cdn.net/f0da47b347e41bb03a_z1m6vl1sd.pdf

    Most of us volunteer to donate money for political activities such as the ratio campaign. We employ attorneys who work for nurses.
    Quote from elkpark
    I not only disagree with this idea, I find it offensive. In nursing, or in any other aspect of life, I have never needed men to "advocate for" or "represent" me.
    I liked these two posts very much. Anyone familiar with herring's history as a nurse would never say she needed to wait for a man to advocate or represent her and her fellow nurses (some men of course).

    And I've never needed a man to "advocate" or "represent" me either. It's nice to have the support of your fellow nurses, male or female, but I stand up for myself. Always have.

    So, count me in as disagreeing with that post as well.

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