Don't buy a dog, not any dog at all.

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    Do not buy a dog, not any dog at all. Ha, the above remark, might lead to you think I do not think people should live with dogs, but, just the reverse, I think almost everyone should live with a dog.

    But, do not buy one, do not support a breeder/puppy mill/store selling dogs from puppy mills/ with YOUR wallet, instead, rescue a homeless dog or puppy from Petfinder.com.
    We have a severe dog overpopulation crisis in USA, (and most other countries as well) with over 6 million dogs being put to death for the crime of not having a home. Each puppy or dog that is bought, competes for the available homes against these dogs:
    Petfinder.com

    http://www.petfinder.com/

    (if your country has a great adopt-a-dog website, please add it below)

    Top Reasons Why People “Buy” Their Dogs:

    1) I want a purebred, so I know what I am getting.

    Fine, go to petfinder, over 40% are purebred dogs. You can sort the homeless dogs there by breed, and even sign up for email alerts if the breed you desire arrives in the dog pound. I totally support researching the type of dog a person brings home, wish more humans did that.

    2) I want to buy my purebred dog, so I know it is healthy.

    This is just opposite of reality, in fact, purebred dogs are plagued at far higher rate with illnesses and maladies, at a higher rate than mutts and mixed breeds. This is due to the smaller gene pool, and less than 5% of breeders properly check dog’s Entire family tree prior to breeding to reduce inheritable problems. If you are really interested in a dog more likely to have a healthy life, consider a mutt!

    3) I want to buy a puppy, so I can see it’s parents, and know what I am getting.

    Ha, this is hilarious! Like humans, dogs can create puppies much unlike themselves in both size, temperament, ability, etc etc. Ask around, some amazing stories out there. Also, the 2 most difficult inborn neurobiological disorders, (visible on MRIs of the dog brain) are the “shy” dog,(reacts to most unknown humans, also called the “fear-aggressive dog”) and the “dog-aggressive dog” (reacts to most unknown dogs) are both recessive genes, and are not visible in the litter box, but manifest later on, at age 6 to 9 months, or later. Many human inborn neurobiological disorders (autism, some forms of schizophrenia, some forms of sociopathy, for example) are inborn, and not evident at birth.

    Most breeders (and most dog authorities) still believe these issues are result of ‘raising the do wrong’, though. We can definitely make such dogs better or worse, but, this behavior is neurobiologically driven. It’s usually only one or two of the litter, and many a person has chosen a pup from two ‘normal’ dog parents, only to find when that pup approaches maturity, it begins to manifest either one of those 2 disorders. You can NOT tell by the parents if the pup will have either disorder.

    Best way to avoid dealing with either issue, is to adopt an adult dog. Either of these 2 difficult disorders, is usually painfully, most obviously evident by 14 months old.

    Much of a dog’s behavioral baselines and traits are inborn,yet, every dog is unique individual.

    4) I want a puppy, so I can be his first human, and guide him into the type of dog I want him to become.

    Fine, go to petfinders, there a millions of puppies there. But, be aware, much of a dog's personality and traits are inborn, and not always evident in the newborn.


    5) If I adopt an adult dog, it won’t “latch” onto me, the way a puppy would.

    Pure horse pucky, nothing could be further from the truth. If you take home an adult dog, that dog will be a bit reserved initially, as it sizes you up, deciding if you are safe. But, once the dog has decided you are safe, (you can spot the day you have been approved, is so heartwarming) that dog will indeed love you more than you love yourself, more than he loves life itself, if you only give him a chance.

    Have you ever needed a second chance?

    6) I don’t want a dog pound dog, there is something wrong with those dogs or they would not be in a dog pound.

    This is so so false.

    THE OVERWHELMING VAST MAJORITY OF DOGS IN PRISON, ARE LOVELY, LOVING DOGS, “READY TO GO” COMPANIONS WITH ZERO ISSUES WHATSOEVER, and did nothing wrong, but got thrown aside for sometimes horrifically stupid reasons…..

    Like...
    • girlfriend did not like the dog,
    • some of these dogs were handled wrong/misunderstood/neglected,
    • some are runaways,
    • some the owners moved and left the poor dog to fend for himself,
    • some couldn’t afford them,
    • relative is allergic,
    • they wanted to move to a 'no pets' apt,
    • human ignorance,
    • owner death/illness,
    • couch potato took home a high energy breed,
    • dog got lost,
    • etc etc, and many dogs never had a chance to show how loving they really are.


    Yes, there are a few problem dogs in dog pounds, (same with puppy mills or those bought from breeders) and the dog pound staff usually spots these dogs fairly quickly, and sometimes these dogs are put down if the problem is severe, not adopted out, or, come with warnings “no other dogs in the house” etc.

    But even those dogs with behavior issues, deserve a good chance to the few of us willing to take on dogs with issues. (these 'special needs' dogs require knowledge, commitment and time, not for everyone).

    MOST DOG POUNDS HAVE PERSONNEL ON HAND TO HELP YOU “TEMPERAMENT TEST” A DOG you are interested in. Many dog rescue groups will send someone over to temp test the dog, in an effort to help one more dog get off death row.

    ADOPTING AN ADULT DOG is a great option. If you do not have the time to go potty train a baby dog (takes very frequent outings for months and MONTHS) or if you are not interested in going through the chewing/destructive phase, the nipping/biting phase, (ouch! ouch! ouch!) the ruin your carpet and drapery and furniture and ipod phase, the “you can’t be away from home too long”phase, the crying all night long phase, the expensive multi-vet trips newborn phase,and all the other stages of puppyhood that may not fit into your lifestyle. Some issues do not manifest til the dog is adult, too. (thread to come on that).

    MEETING YOUR DOG AS AN ADULT is much less mysterious than bringing home an infant dog. Dawg bless those humans who will invest 24/7, for almost a year, into raising up and training baby dogs.

    IF YOU REALLY WANT A NO-MYSTERY DOG, consider adopting a dog in “rescue”.(being 'fostered') (his is different from a dog in a “shelter”/dog pound.)

    The dog in “rescue” is living with a foster family, who can tell you allll about the dog, every little thing, is he friendly, outgoing, is he lazy, couch potato, or hyper, how much exercise does this dog need to stay sane, does he walk nicely on a leash, what is he afraid of, how does he get on with cats, strangers, kids, etc, does he shed much or bark a lot, is he okay home alone, how is he in a car, is he destructive if home alone, does he have any behavioral issues at all, etc etc etc, WHATEVER you want to know about a dog, that family can and will tell you the truth, they are interested in finding a good match.

    Dogs in dog pounds cost about $50, some are more. A few are almost free, and most dog pound shave “specials”, too, but, if you are really poor, check to see if you can really afford a dog’s food and vet bills, etc etc.

    Dogs in “rescue” are usually about $200, but the org is not making profit, once the food, vet bills, transport, etc is subtracted, and need that to keep their mission going.

    GO FIND YOUR NEXT BEST FRIEND!!! http://www.petfinder.com/
    Last edit by Joe V on Feb 9, '13
    dinobun, AnonRNC, kabfighter, and 1 other like this.
  2. 152 Comments so far...

  3. 0
    sorry for the runtogether words, i am having some trouble correcting that, but sorry.
  4. 0
    Another point worth considering, to those who insist a lousy childhood = a lousy behaving dog, (and, not all dogs in pounds have had lousy childhoods)
    is
    alllllllllllll the 1000s of stories,
    of dogs rescued from the most severe neglect, the most devastating abuse,
    yet
    stand there,
    loving every human and every dog.
    Last edit by somenurse on Feb 6, '13
  5. 1
    Quote from Jean Marie46514
    sorry for the runtogether words, i am having some trouble correcting that, but sorry.
    I edited for you.
    somenurse likes this.
  6. 3
    You didn't mention the two reason why I buy dogs. I have a very specific job for a dog to do, one that takes vast amounts of training as well as natural instinct. The only way to make sure I don't waste years training a dog that doesn't have the natural drive and desire to do the very specific job I need done is to buy one from a certain breed of dog from a reputable breeder where I can see the parents work, and has a long history of producing working dogs with the specific natural instinct I need.
    The other reason I buy dogs is that our local shelter will not allow anyone without a fenced yard to adopt a dog. I live in the middel of nowhere on 43 acres in a very rural area. I don't need or want a fence. I don't have a problem keeping my dogs on my property.
    sharpeimom, VivaLasViejas, and Fuzzy like this.
  7. 3
    As I've said in my other post. To each his own. Everyone has a reason for either buying form a breeder or buying from a shelter/rescue. I've done both.

    The fallacy that mixes are healthier then purebreds is just that. I work in vet medicine so I've seen a lot of purebreds and mixed breeds over the years. Purebreds and mixed breeds have the same issues. The pups are only as good as the parents. The designer "breed" thing proved that. Breeders were touting that these specially bred mixes were immune from every thing because of hybrid vigor. Well I've seen these mixes and randon bred mixes with everything from allergies to PDA's, to liver shunts, to hip/elbow dyplasia, to epilepsy, to sebaceous adentitis, and other physical genetic/congential problems. The vet teaching hospitals have seen the same. I have yet to see a mixed breed dog have health clearences through the OFA or CERF. Now I will admit that many purebreds have been screwed up. These include bulldogs, pugs, and other brachycephalic breeds. However mixes that include these breeds are just as screwed up as the purebreds. The health issues do not go away because the dog is mixed with something else. Again the pups are only as good as the parents.

    PMFB-RN brings up a couple of points in his reply. Good working dogs do not come from the pound unless they were surrendered because of their lack of working ability. (Ethical breeders do not surrender their dogs to shelters or rescues. They usually have a list of people who want pets.) Most legitimate service dog organizations breed their own working stock as do police departments and the military. The other point is that many shelters/rescues have made it almost impossible for people to take dogs from their facilities. The rules for include: fenced yards; owned homes; no children under a certain age or no children at all; all other pets n the home must be sterilized; has to have a person in the house 24/7; and the list goes on. The shelter that I am fostering this crazy dog for will not allow some one to train the dog for competition or work. Somehow I'm fostering it and I train dogs for obedience competition and hunting. I also don't have a fenced yard. However I can take the dog to work with me. Plus the dog is being trained in hopes that the seperation anxiety can become better controlled.

    So again to each his own.

    Fuzzy
    2 rescue dogs
    1 foster
    1 dog purchased from an ethical breeder
    3 tamed feral felines
    sharpeimom, VivaLasViejas, and tntrn like this.
  8. 0
    Quote from PMFB-RN
    You didn't mention the two reason why I buy dogs. I have a very specific job for a dog to do, one that takes vast amounts of training as well as natural instinct. The only way to make sure I don't waste years training a dog that doesn't have the natural drive and desire to do the very specific job I need done is to buy one from a certain breed of dog from a reputable breeder where I can see the parents work, and has a long history of producing working dogs with the specific natural instinct I need.
    The other reason I buy dogs is that our local shelter will not allow anyone without a fenced yard to adopt a dog. I live in the middel of nowhere on 43 acres in a very rural area. I don't need or want a fence. I don't have a problem keeping my dogs on my property.

    This is one of the few actually rational reasons to "buy" a dog, is when one has to have a working dog. Still, one can meet an adult dog, to assess the inner drive and talent,
    and adult dogs CAN LEARN most anything at all.***
    Also, your point about the fence is a valid point, too.

    ***one exception, is training a dog to tolerate other creatures, IS best done when dog is a puppy. Still can be done to an adult dog, (i've done it) but, it's far harder to train an adult dog to leave chickens alone, than it is to train a puppy the same thing. Otherwise, most anything else, an adult dog can be trained. I even think adult dogs make better 'students' and learn far faster than puppies.

    but, most dog owners aren't needing a 'working' dog, but, for those who do, that is rational reason, however, not all puppies of a breed WILL grow up to be the typical dog of that breed. For example, there are border collies who have little to no herding instinct. (especially now that the AKC has recently 'recognized' the breed, and now, BCs are being bred for the AKC beauty contest, not for their ability...sigh)
    A puppy is always a bit of a mystery, as all dogs are unique individuals.
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    //"The designer "breed" thing proved that."//


    uhm, show me a breed that is NOT a designer dog. Except for dingos, all dogs that ARE recognized by the AKC ARE designer dogs. We humans have bred these dogs, sometimes to freakishly disabling contortions, sometimes to the point of almost helplessness,
    all breeds are "designers" dogs.

    I disagree that all the recent wave of 'oodle" dogs and other new mixes, are necessarily less healthy than breeds you are comfortable recognizing. (see video to follow).
    Few new breeds have been bred to have extreme short legs like the doxie, (does not resemble the original doxie)
    few new breeds have been bred to have unhealthy hip slope of the GSD, that you probably view as an "okay" or "real" breed of dog,
    few new breeds have been bred to have the overly rounded head of the King Charles spaniel, (hard to find even ONE of that breed that is actually healthy, and what painful disorders, oh my)

    many many breeds that people think of as "real" breeds--not "designer" breeds, have been destroyed by fads and small gene pools.
    Last edit by somenurse on Feb 7, '13
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    //"The fallacy that mixes are healthier then purebreds is just that."//

    Most purebreds in the USA, 80% of the litters of AKC pups, come from backyard breeders. These breeders tend to mate up dogs based on cuteness, zero health testing done.
    Of the remaining 20% of litters in the USA, 15% of the breeders do "some" health testing prior to mating the dogs.

    and of that 20%, only 5% do a full family tree of both parents, and these maginificent breeders are actually working to improve the breed, to create specimens that are free of the rampant list of disorders plaguing our purebreds. Many excellent documentaries all over the place, on the plight of the purebred. It's not just the few breeds you list as being destroyed by shabby breeding practices, it's many many breeds. The more 'popular' the breed, the more likely that breed is fraught with health issues.

    The AKC is even okay with parent/child matings, even further condensing the already tiny gene pool.
    True, a mixed breed can have health problems, but, the bigger the gene pool, the more diluted the now-intensely concentrated genes for destruction are.

    //". I have yet to see a mixed breed dog have health clearences through the OFA or CERF."//

    rofl! I bet you haven't!! Not a lot of breeders are interested in certifying mutts!!
    Last edit by somenurse on Feb 7, '13
  11. 0
    //"Good working dogs do not come from the pound unless they were surrendered because of their lack of working ability."//

    ^this statement is one myth i'd reeeally love to help squash out. It is not true. at all. I know, i know, you've heard it all your life, it IS a most common myth, it is understandable why someone would believe it is "true". and, no doubt, you may have some assorted anecdotal examples of some dogs from a dog pound who had problems, to further feed the myth.

    still, it is a myth.


    I own a border collie, taken from the death row box, in a dog pound, and this dog can herd like nobody's business. Never saw a sheep til he was about 2 years old, and wowza, does he herd like a pro. Buddy ended up in dog pound cuz the puppy mill where 100s of AKC registered dogs were being bred in cruelest fashion you can imagine, was finally finally closed down, after years and years of protest by locals about the condition these dogs were being kept in. Because these dogs were raised in cages 24/7, most were thought to be 'ruined'. Turns out, they weren't.

    I have many a pal in the dog training world, the animal-behaviorist world, and the herding dog world, who own or train dogs from dog pounds to be seeing eye dogs, other types of assistant dogs, dogs who work to find dead people or detect fire accelerants, herding dogs, all types of working dogs,
    chosen as adults,
    trained as adults,
    and doing fine.

    But, not everyone knows a great deal about how to train dogs,
    or how dogs learn,
    so many people do falsely think, "you have to teach a puppy stuff, only puppies can learn, not adult dogs!"
    but,
    having trained many a puppy
    and many many many adult dogs,
    i can vouch, it is actually far easier to train an adult dog. to do ANYTHING!!!
    Last edit by somenurse on Feb 7, '13


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