Feeling Frustrated

  1. 3
    I live in Illinois and there is a lot of discussion on neighborhood job boards regarding all the school issues (mainly teachers striking). I have been working in my profession for over 30 years and I am tired of hearing about how much harder the teachers work than anyone else. We are on 24/7 365 days a year. There is a website that lists all public school teachers salaries in the state of Illinois (familytaxpayers.org). What an eye opener for me.
    I wouldn't mind having the summer off, 2 weeks at Christmas, spring break.....they need to work a few holidays like we do. Don't get me wrong, I love my job....but there are days...
    I don't know how to respond to the comments without losing my cool.

    Rose
  2. 7 Comments so far...

  3. 6
    I agree with you, at least partially. Teachers work normal hours, get weekends and holidays off, and have the chance to have all summer off. In addition, their benefits and retirement plans tend to be some of the best that can be found for workers in their income bracket.

    On the other hand, keep in mind that many jobs look better to those of us who are on the outside looking in. Teachers must frequently spend their own hard-earned money on supplies. Many arrive to school one hour early and leave a couple of hours after the school day has ended. Many teachers work through their summers to teach summer school, coach an athletic team, tutor students, and do other things to earn money. A number of teachers take their work home with them through grading papers at home and preparing lessons on their kitchen tables.

    We should also not discount teachers' education. I once read a statistic indicating that more than 40 percent of teachers are educated at the MA/MS/M.Ed level. Less than 5 percent of nurses are educated at the MSN level. For their level of education, many teachers could be paid more.
    nrsang97, VivaLasViejas, sharpeimom, and 3 others like this.
  4. 2
    In many places, there is a strong financial incentive to further your education. In the district I live, your pay is based solely on number of years experience, and number of post-grad credits you complete (you can earn more before you even earn another degree).

    My sister is a teacher, and I looked at it when I was considering a career change (I chose nursing instead). The problem I see, at least in this area, is that beginning teachers don't make enough, and they overpay those who have racked up years and degrees, regardless of performance. I have a hard time believing a classroom teacher with 20 years and a Ph D is worth 90% more in pay then a beginning teacher.
    anotherone and elprup like this.
  5. 3
    <-------------in awe of anyone who can spend the bulk of her/his waking hours with a buncha kids or teens. I love kids, but, even many parents admit, wow, it's nice to get away from kids now and then.


    //"I have a hard time believing a classroom teacher with 20 years and a PhD is worth 90% more in pay then a beginning teacher."//

    I also think there might be a 90% difference between a BA in healthcare, and a doctorate with 20 years experience in healthcare fields. (not sure)

    None of these pay scales, except for possbily the tip top, seem that impressive to me.


    Probably admins and doctorates with 20 years experience n healthcare also make 90% more than the new BSNs are making, i'd think..




    http://www.ncpublicschools.org/docs/...3schedules.pdf


    NYC Teachers Salary Schedule | United Federation of Teachers
    ^looks like NY teachers make more than NC teachers, but, cost of living in NY is pretty darn high in much of the state.(oh wow, is it ever!) Still, most of those are not crazy high pay scales, esp for NY, which can charge a person $900 or more a month just to park your car.

    I think some conservative radio channels and tv stations, in anti-union rants, have done some damage to the reputation of a profession that i much admire, and know, i could never ever do. Loved my own kids, but, i had to have breaks of being around kids or teens now and then.
    and TC is right, most of these teachers do spend their own "off" time grading papers, preparing for class, and spend their own cash to get supplies. Teaching is not what i'd call "cushy" work at all.
    Last edit by somenurse on Feb 13, '13
    nrsang97, sharpeimom, and TheCommuter like this.
  6. 1
    I know many teachers and though they work hard and often do supply tools and things for their students...are they responsible for a life!
    The difference is they have a strong union that has fought for them and kept their "needs" in the face of society. Many people have no idea that nurses are underpaid. They figure everyone working in healthcare, except maybe the aides, are paid well thanks to the amount of money they pay for insurance or medical treatments. I know factory workers with high school diplomas that are paid more than a starting nurse! Even our local Home Depot pays better than the nursing homes. Wonder why we have a "shortage"? I have told many a friend that in my next life I want to come back and be a teacher or a 2nd term politician!
    aknottedyarn likes this.
  7. 4
    I think nurses and teachers both have hard jobs. But trying to figure out which is most difficult is like the metaphorical apples-to-oranges---there's just too much variance to make a valid comparison between them.

    Personally, I couldn't do what a teacher does. Dealing with other peoples' children all day, right off the bat, would make me crazy. Sure, I'd love to have summers off, but all the extracurricular activities teachers have to do during the work week would be exhausting---organizing parties and open-house events, lesson planning, decorating, grading papers lining up volunteer parents for class trips and projects, and the sheer amount of paperwork more than makes up for the few precious weeks teachers may take off.

    And frankly, I think ALL of us, nurses and teachers alike, are sorely underpaid for the level of responsibility we assume when we step into our workplaces on any given day.
  8. 3
    Quote from VivaLasViejas
    I think nurses and teachers both have hard jobs. But trying to figure out which is most difficult is like the metaphorical apples-to-oranges---there's just too much variance to make a valid comparison between them.

    Personally, I couldn't do what a teacher does. Dealing with other peoples' children all day, right off the bat, would make me crazy. Sure, I'd love to have summers off, but all the extracurricular activities teachers have to do during the work week would be exhausting---organizing parties and open-house events, lesson planning, decorating, grading papers lining up volunteer parents for class trips and projects, and the sheer amount of paperwork more than makes up for the few precious weeks teachers may take off.

    And frankly, I think ALL of us, nurses and teachers alike, are sorely underpaid for the level of responsibility we assume when we step into our workplaces on any given day.
    I agree!
    nrsang97, somenurse, and aknottedyarn like this.
  9. 2
    I have had the opportunity to see teaching up close and personal. My mother taught school for almost 30 years. She had been a nurse, and LPN, prior to going back to college to become a teacher. In my life I have been a substitute teacher, a teacher of adults and found it to be enjoyable for every age. Dealing with a class poom full of energic children is very difficult.

    Think of the heliocopter family members that drive you bonkers. Multiply that by the size of the classroom. If 30 children or more are trying to get the attention of one teacher what happens? The quieter ones get less. it is difficult fo teachers to deal with this fact the same way it is difficult to have patients and families who think they are staying at the Hilton.

    Every job has it's good and bad points. I know nurses who became teachers and had the opportunity to teach a teacher who wanted to be a nurse. My BIL was a large animal practice vet. In his office he had a poster of a field divided into 4 parts by barbed wire. In each part there was a cow. Each cow had her nose under the fence to get the grass on the other side.
    VivaLasViejas and somenurse like this.


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