Your Period and Its Spiritual Significance.

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    We usually feel reluctant to think positively of this painful and somewhat inconvenient point in each month, but what if we could use this time to grow and understand ourselves more, spiritually?

    Your Period and Its Spiritual Significance.

    A woman's body is mysterious and yet simple in its rhythm of ebb and flow. We usually feel reluctant to think positively of this painful and somewhat inconvenient point in each month, but what if we could use this time to grow and understand ourselves spiritually? Our menstrual cycles are parallels to our inner struggles, our angers, our time of needed rest. There's still a lot we don't understand about our periods, but if we find a way to address the issues at a time when our bodies are reminding us to, it could be exponentially valuable to our physical, emotional, and spiritual well-being.

    We go day by day, our routines are the tracks of the train of our lives. Perhaps the moment goes unnoticed, we shrug things off, and pay no mind to the inner voice of struggle. Yet, for most, as we reach close to our cycle we have no choice but be thrown in a hot deep ocean of heightened emotions, irritability, sadness, anxiety, and fatigue. As if our bodies have accumulated all our unacknowledged emotional concerns over the past month and have handed them right back in a giant steaming heap. Clinically diagnosed, this is called PMS. What if our "irrational" angers stem from an anger we've carried, long overdue for its time of healing passing. Each moment that we feel this rush of emotion, whatever it may be, we must ask ourselves, "where have I carried this before?" "Where have I felt a lower version of this stronger emotion I am feeling right now?" "How can I choose to let it go?" It's simple, yet difficult, because it questions our view of our unbreakable selves, our forever rationally and sound version of ourselves. Emotional and spiritual healing is a process of swimming through the humiliation of our past understandings and walking out of it like a lotus blooming through the mud.

    Our bodies speak to us so much more than in a physical sense. Just the idea that our period is the act of our womb shedding away the lining that was built during the previous menstrual cycle, is symbolic of our needs to shed away all that is not helping us spiritually. We are our own medicine and our bodies are our own doctors. Even our cramps play a role in our emotional healing. As painful and sometimes horrible they may be, they are also what gives us power in perseverance, in mind over matter, perspective, and the strength of overcoming our physical discomforts, so that possibly one day we will have the power of releasing a new life into this world. There are many things that make us all strong women and the one that we all share is the adversity through our menstrual cycles, it is what connects us all and asks us to grow and understand more.

    Taking time to ourselves for introspective thinking during our menstrual cycles is a very natural and healing process. These concepts have been present throughout the history of our ancestors. A society in tune with nature and recognizable for its spiritual culture, Native Americans, acknowledged the healing power a woman's menstrual cycle held. Many tribes would even celebrate the event of a young girl's first period, a horrific thought in today's world. Women would gather together in the same tent, far away from the tribe, during their bleeding days to talk and overcome the painful uncomfortable experience together. The Cherokee Indians believed that women were more powerful and intuitive when menstruating, so much so, that it was not uncommon for tribe members to seek out a menstruating women for insight or guidance to connect them to a greater power. In many other cultures throughout the world, some positive, some negative, women were regarded as holding a portal of power. After all, it makes sense to think that someone that could continue to bleed profusely for days without dying would hold some form of higher power.

    Our menstrual cycles are truly our gift from nature. They are our natural teachers of emotional and spiritual growth and our bodies function as a reflection of these needs. It is time we begin to acknowledge and listen to our bodies, follow the intuition and face the adversity with love and understanding. This is what defines us as women and shapes us into strong and loving mothers. It's time to love, listen, and understand the message our menstrual cycle is giving us.



    P.S. This article was written purely to inspire love and to cherish our menstrual cycles. In no way is this article against the decision some women make to use contraceptives to stop their periods. We are all here to support one another and we each heal and grow differently.
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    About medicinewoman33

    A lover, a healer, a student aspiring to carry the same great knowledge and wisdom all nurses hold close to heart. 26yrs of age, attending nursing at TTC, happily married with three mini-dachshund.

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    68 Comments

  3. by   jennylee321
    As I read this article I am experiencing some pretty hideous cramps and sorry I do not believe they have healing power or that I'm a stronger woman for having them. I see them as a reason for missing school and other fun activities when I was growing up. I think of the dread I have lying awake from them when I know I have a shift in a few hours. Sorry but pain is pain even when it's related to womanhood, yes maybe birth is beautiful for some people and it empowers them. But I bet you if someone went through all of labour and at the end of it all they birthed a menstrual lining it would neither be "all worth it" or empowering.
    Last edit by jennylee321 on Nov 20 : Reason: Spelling
  4. by   Farawyn
    If you have severe cramps, excessive bleeding during your periods and severe PMS, please see your GYN.

    Once that is all good, only then can your lotus bloom in the mud.
    (Love the metaphor.)
    Last edit by Farawyn on Nov 20
  5. by   seaofclouds21
    There was no mind over matter for some of my cramps. I ended up getting a partial hysterectomy at 35 due to endometriosis. Those cramps were horrible. There was nothing good that came from them and no strengthening my mind to overcome them. There was nothing empowering about being stopped dead in my tracks, doubled over in pain. If anything, it was the exact opposite. That partial hysterectomy was one of the best things for me. If anything, that was my empowering moment. No more pain, no more periods.
    Last edit by seaofclouds21 on Nov 20
  6. by   pixierose
    Quote from seaofclouds21
    There was no mind over matter for some of my cramps. I ended up getting a partial hysterectomy at 35 due to endometriosis. Those cramps were horrible. There was nothing good that came from them and no strengthening my mind to overcome them. There was nothing empowering about being stopped dead in my tracks, doubled over in pain. If anything, it was the exact opposite. That partial hysterectomy was one of the best things If anything, that was my empowering moment. No more pain, no more periods.
    I actually just left my ObGyn's office, discussing this next option.

    Birth control didn't help my endometriosis, nor did mirena.

    Like someone else said, pain is pain. I'm not big on my lotus growing anywhere when I'm doubled over yet again ...
  7. by   BCgradnurse
    Yeah, I really wasn't grateful for the excessive bleeding and severe cramps I experienced. It didn't make me wiser, more intuitive, etc. It did make me cranky, unproductive, and anemic. What I am thankful for is menopause and not having to deal with all that anymore.

    Nothing spiritual to me about it.
  8. by   Farawyn
    Quote from BCgradnurse
    Yeah, I really wasn't grateful for the excessive bleeding and severe cramps I experienced. It didn't make me wiser, more intuitive, etc. It did make me cranky, unproductive, and anemic. What I am thankful for is menopause and not having to deal with all that anymore.

    Nothing spiritual to me about it.
    You're just not listening to your body!
    You're not strong enough to embrace your womanhood!!!

    Sorry to all those who have actual medical issues and real pain, or just have crappy cramps and excess bleeding just because.

    Wooooo doesn't help.
    Yes, there's stuff to be said for lowering stress, exercise, thinking positive, all of that. No one is discounting this.
    For many women, it is TORTURE at worst and an inconvenience at best.
    I LOVE being a woman. I loved being pregnant. I am lucky that my period has been mostly okay.
    Gyn problems have very little (read: nothing) to do with your inner spirituality.

    This article feels a little shamey shamey to me.
  9. by   Sour Lemon
    Quote from Farawyn
    You're just not listening to your body!
    You're not strong enough to embrace your womanhood!!!

    Sorry to all those who have actual medical issues and real pain, or just have crappy cramps and excess bleeding just because.

    Wooooo doesn't help.
    Yes, there's stuff to be said for lowering stress, exercise, thinking positive, all of that. No one is discounting this.
    For many women, it is TORTURE at worst and an inconvenience at best.
    I LOVE being a woman. I loved being pregnant. I am lucky that my period has been mostly okay.
    Gyn problems have very little (read: nothing) to do with your inner spirituality.

    This article feels a little shamey shamey to me.
    Fair or not, my first thought was that "wine" wrote this article. Do people really have these types of thoughts when they're sober?
  10. by   JenTheSchoolRN
    I got an IUD to help with severe cramps and birth control and I haven't had a period for almost 4 years.

    And that was what I felt empowered about. That I made that choice. I do not miss my period. At all.
  11. by   Farawyn
    Quote from Sour Lemon
    Fair or not, my first thought was that "wine" wrote this article. Do people really have these types of thoughts when they're sober?
    I like wine, but never enough to write sonnets to Aunt Flo.

    I don't think it is badly written. OP, you seem sincere.
    I just don't share the love.
  12. by   SummitRN
    I know a lot of women with Endo, PCOS, PMDD, and similar. Their responses to the nonsensical ramblings in this article are not within the code of conduct to post here.

    Cool that OP waxes philosophical about her menstrual cycle, and cool to anyone who does, but telling others they are missing out on some spiritual healing process if only they'd be more introspective and then Cherokee warriors will seek their advice is preachy new-age smugness at its worst!
  13. by   elkpark
    "Preachy new-age smugness at its worst" -- yeah, that's the phrase I was groping for ... Thanks!
  14. by   annabanana2
    Man, my IUD was the best health-related decision I ever made. Rock-solid birth control and no periods for going on 7 years now. I still get very minor monthly cramps but that's about it. I'm basically an IUD evangelical at this point.

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