would you do the same?

  1. WOULD WE DO THE SAME?
    >
    > At Pearl Harbor there was a cook, down in the bowels of the Arizona, a
    black guy, when the Japs came in.
    >
    > A cook, but a sailor, a Navy man, and there was hell all around.
    >
    > And he did what a man does. He fought. He got above decks and worked
    his way through the fire and he manned a gun. A deck gun, an anti-aircraft
    gun, this cook guy, and he just opened up. All by himself. One American with
    a backbone.
    >
    > And he fought for what was right, he fought for his flag, he fought
    for his country.
    >
    > A cook.
    >
    > Because that's what an American does.
    >
    > Like these guys the other day on the plane. The ones over
    Pennsylvania. They stood up and they drew the line. And they did what had to
    be done. And they died as a result. They died in defense of others, they
    died in defense of their country.
    >
    > We know two of their names.
    >
    > The first was Jeremy Glick, a 31-year-old out of New Jersey. Young
    wife, newborn baby, up and comer. Take charge kind of guy. Was president of
    his college fraternity.
    >
    > That was at the University of Rochester, where the guy who wrote the
    "Pledge of Allegiance" went to college.
    >
    > Anyway, it was a United flight, out of Newark, and it got pretty much
    all the way to Cleveland before whatever happened started to happen. Because
    that's when it started to go haywire on the radar. That's when the hijack
    began.
    >
    > And they cut somebody bad and they got in the cockpit and it was all
    in the wind.
    >
    > And Jeremy Glick got on the phone. On his little cell phone. Just like
    another guy, Thomas E. Burnett Jr., another one of those take-charge kind of
    guys.
    >
    > And they spoke to their wives, the two of them. And Jeremy Glick's
    family got the FBI on the line, over about a half an hour, and his wife,
    with the little baby there, told him about the World Trade Center and about
    the terrorists.
    >
    > And they knew. Jeremy Glick and Tom Burnett and probably another
    couple of guys. They knew. Because they were Americans.
    >
    > They knew it was up to them.
    >
    > Whatever was going to be, it was going to be them. Like that cook guy.
    It was stand-up time.
    >
    > And they were just passengers, men, American men, and there was hell
    all around.
    >
    > And they did what men do. They fought.
    >
    > But they fought smart.
    >
    > Jeremy Glick told his wife about it. He said they were going to make a
    play. The slit guy was dead now and the hijackers were locked in the cockpit
    and Jeremy and Tom and the other guys were going to make a play. That's what
    they said on their cell phones.
    >
    > And they did it like Americans do. They voted. And they made their
    plan. And Jeremy Glick wished his wife a good life, and asked her to look
    after their daughter. Then the talk stopped and on the cell phone Jeremy's
    wife heard the struggle and the chaos.
    >
    > And she was a widow.
    >
    > The good guys won. At the price of their lives, they won. Like
    patriots before them, they bought victory with blood.
    >
    > And who knows what they saved. Maybe the White House. Maybe the
    Capitol. Maybe a hundred people, maybe a thousand. But they won. They
    stopped the terrorists and they took it into the ground to do it.
    >
    > They did it like Americans.
    >
    > A cook, a couple of Internet guys, some husbands on a plane. Days of
    infamy and deeds of glory.
    >
    > And examples to follow.
    >
    > Because you never know. You never know when Sunday breakfast is going
    to be rocked by dive-bombers and kamikazes, and you never know when a
    routine flight is going to be a fight to the death.
    >
    > You never know when you're going to have to stand up. When you're
    going to have to be a man. When you're going to have to be an American.
    >
    > You never know, but you better be ready.
    >
    > Like these guys were.
    >
    > What the animals did is forever engraved in our minds, in the images
    of shattered and tumbling buildings. But what we did is more subtlety
    portrayed, in a scorched trench in a Pennsylvania field.
    >
    > That is our inspiration. That is our example.
    >
    > That is the first American stand in the next American war.
    >
    > - by Bob Lonsberry © 2001
    >
    >
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  2. 1 Comments

  3. by   CEN35
    makes me want to cry

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