WHY WHY WHY --Dr. Kovorkian to be freed

  1. I read the NY news last nite and was so tired I was sure I had not read correctly.
    So this AM I had to do a search and sure enough Dr Kovorkian is getting out of prison.

    I am starting to feel more and more wrong is becoming right and right is no longer -- like this is sureal -- I am shocked. Anyone else ever feel as such?


    CHICAGO SUN-TIMES :: Nation :: Dr. Kevorkian to be paroled
    Last edit by SilentfadesRPA on Dec 15, '06
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  2. 80 Comments

  3. by   live_crow
    Given that he was always eligible for parole on the data in question, why shouldn't they let him out? He has served his time, undertaken not to assist any more suicides, and is apparently terminally ill.

    I can't believe he went to jail in the first place.
  4. by   GardenDove
    What's the problem? He's an old man, on his last leg. He promised the parole board not to assist in an suicides, the article says.


    Mayer Morganroth, Kevorkian's attorney, said this summer that Kevorkian, now 78, was suffering from hepatitis C and diabetes, that his weight had dropped to 113 pounds and that he had less than a year to live.
  5. by   Tanvi Tusti
    Quote from silentfades
    I read the NY news last nite and was so tired I was sure I had not read correctly.
    So this AM I had to do a search and sure enough Dr Kovorkian is getting out of prison.

    I am starting to feel more and more wrong is becoming right and right is no longer -- like this is sureal -- I am shocked. Anyone else ever feel as such?


    CHICAGO SUN-TIMES :: Nation :: Dr. Kevorkian to be paroled
    OMG, I cannot believe your reaction to this. Dr Kevorkian is an old man who has only a year at most to live. Personally I think it was an atrocity that he was imprisioned in the first place. He was only helping people die with dignity after all. You should go work in The Netherlands were euthanasia is legal. I did it for 4 months and was so impressed with what I saw. The fact that the rest of the world treats the dying with less dignity and forces suffering upon those that truly embrace their death, needs to learn a lesson or two from the place. I applaud anyone that gives patients the opportunity to end their life in the way in which they choose, they certainly should not be punished for it. Obviously there needs to be strict regulation in place when euthanasia is performed, but surely it's inhuman to allow the suffering that some people endure. We would never allow our animals to suffer like that would we, so why do we do it to our loved ones?
  6. by   GardenDove
    Regarding euthanasia, I'm totally against it. Kevorkian was, from the accounts that I read, obsessed and a little off his rocker. But I don't see any problem with his being paroled.
  7. by   tvccrn
    I think that we as a nation treat animals much better than we do humans. When an animal has no hope for a good quality of life and is suffering in pain, what do we do? We gently send them to sleep, telling them that we love them and only want for them to be well again.

    When a person has no hope for a good quality of life and is suffering in pain, what do we do? We make them suffer the pain, go through the indignity of deteriorating to a mere shell of the person they once were. Why? Because to help them end their life, to give them the control to do so would be murder. Please.

    If I am to soon be in a state of health where I can be assured that I will end up in a fetal position, without the mind to feed myself or interact with my loved ones I will make sure I have the funds to move to Amsterdam and be able to chopice how I die.

    tvccrn
  8. by   leslie :-D
    i'm fine with his release.
    and i don't think he'll assist anyone else (keeping my feelings out of it).
    but i wouldn't be surprised to learn that when appropriate, he will 'help' himself.
    losing 113 lbs. is not indicative of a well man.

    leslie
  9. by   elkpark
    IMO, he never should have been sent to prison in the first place. I'm glad he's finally getting out.
  10. by   laughing weasel
    I hope that I am never in such a situation, but if I was I would not want to rely on amateurs or family to assist me in my demise although sometimes I think some of my family would like to help me out.. He was helping people to control their own life I may not agree with their choices but I will fight for their right to make them.
  11. by   Ginger222
    I have to say that I agree with Elkpark on this one....I work on an Alzheimer's Unit...has anyone ever seen end stage Alzheimer's...it is heart renching....I watch my patients go from slightly confused to literally 70 year old people with the mentality of 3-year olds...wondering around like lost puppies, most can't even tell you they are hungry or have to go to the bathroom so they either lash out or withdraw into their own world....and that is not even the end stage...in the last stage they become vegatative, some families opt for G-Tubes and they they remain like a vegatable for years..it's really sad....then others call in Hospice which IMO is the most compassionate selfless thing to do because then the patient can go peacfully with the family at their bedside..some nurses think I have a cold view about this but I believe I care as much about their impending death that I do about their life, of course I want them to live and I want to make them comfortable but when they are terminal I also want to make them comfortable..and their families too.....IMO, Dr. Kavorkian had mercy of people in pain.....I hope somone has mercy on him....
  12. by   sunnyjohn
    Quote from earle58
    i'm fine with his release.
    and i don't think he'll assist anyone else (keeping my feelings out of it).
    but i wouldn't be surprised to learn that when appropriate, he will 'help' himself.
    losing 113 lbs. is not indicative of a well man.

    leslie
    :yeahthat:
  13. by   Lacie
    Quote from laughing weasel
    I hope that I am never in such a situation, but if I was I would not want to rely on amateurs or family to assist me in my demise although sometimes I think some of my family would like to help me out.. He was helping people to control their own life I may not agree with their choices but I will fight for their right to make them.
    He never should have been imprisoned! The people he assisted made these decisions on thier own and from what I seen from previous reports/interviews they were well informed in making thier decision. We treat animals with more dignity at lifes end then we do human kind. I've seen too many patients that wanted to be let go only be held in this world to please other family members needs and not the pts desires as a whole. If I'm ever in the situation to be in nothing but pain and loss of dignity with no hope of recovery - Hello Dr. K!!! Bring it on!
  14. by   lauralassie
    This is a common practice in Europe. Instead of putting people in ICU and putting tubes in every orafice they have , restraining them, and then saying, now die, I dare you ! ( wich from experience , usually means a fight between the family, med/ surg dr's)People can die with dignity. I can't remember the exact nature of his practice but, There are many times I think he has the correct idea.Besides, this happens all the time, It's just that Americans tend to want to cover their heads like it doesn't. There are many chronic and terminal pt's out there who are on all kinds of medications, that are told by therir DR. " now don't take too many of these it will kill you". Then you can guess what happens next. II wish the medical community were abel to treat people with dignity, without so much fear of law suits etc. There are all kinds of arguments about this but, unless we are the ones with the painful , terminal DX. then we shouldn't judge those that do. (Until we've walked a mile in their shoes)

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