Where is the Outrage? (Part II)

  1. The media lately has been in a mostly justified frenzy over the mistreatment of Iraqi prisoners by American soldiers. So far, I have not seen stories about the "poor troops, brutalized by an unjust war, acting out their frustration." I think that's a good thing, because we need to place the blame for these incidents squarely where it belongs, on the shoulders of the troops involved, and their chain of command.

    Having said that, what I don't understand is why, both in the media and on this board, that these atrocities are the only ones that seem capable of whipping people into a frenzy. Not long ago, Iraqi rebels in Fallujah ambushed a convoy of civilian contractors, and killed four. The bodies were burned, then dragged through the streets of Fallujah. Two were even hung from a bridge, I suppose to prolong the message being sent. Then, just a few days ago, another American was beheaded by Al Qaeda. Just to make sure we knew how tough these guys were, the beheading was filmed and put up on the internet so that the young man's family and friends could see his last, horrifying moments. Oh, the story of Nicholas Berg made headlines for a day or so. But, it is already falling into obscurity. Of course, many papers, including the St Louis paper had to make sure that a photo of Burg's father, taken just moments after he learned of his son's death, and the nature of that death, was prominently displayed on the front page. And the story of the civilians killed in Fallujah is already gone. But the story of the mistreatment of Iraqi prisoners goes on and on. Again, I am forced to ask, where is the outrage?

    Many stories I have read, and at least one thread on this board, seem to approach the atrocities committed against the Americans almost apologetically. The upshot seems to be that only Americans can commit atrocities worthy of being thown in our faces daily. The acts committed by Iraqis come across as justified, if regrettable, acts of righteous rage against the American Imperialist. Bunk.

    I know, not all who oppose this war (on this board, in the media, and elsewhere) feel this way. But there is enough of this sentiment going around that it turns my stomach.

    Kevin McHugh
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  2. 174 Comments

  3. by   kmchugh
    By the way, I fully expect replies telling me that "just because I don't write about it doesn't mean...." Whatever. The point of my post is to make people think, to look inside themselves. Why are you outraged? Is it because of inhuman acts? Or is it because of politics? Unfortunately, the people for whom it is more a question of politics don't have the courage to do that kind of introspection, so maybe I'm just wasting my time.

    KM
  4. by   jnette
    I'm outraged... more than that, I'm sickened. Grieved beyond measure by it ALL.

    I guess to me, it's just that I've always felt that our standards were so much higher. Not that what the Iraqis or terrorists do isn't deserving of outrage... it is. Not that their horrific actions are in any way justified.. they aren't.

    I think it's again, that I'm so much more disappointed in our own actions because I do not EXPECT us to act in this manner, where I DO expect them to. Because I thought we were to be an example to them in this liberation process, and it hursts me deeply to know that this entire incident may have negated everything we were supposed to do there.

    No matter how much good may have been accomplished, or continues there, this black mark is what these people will see, and the mistrust of our "liberation" renewed.

    I hate it all. It's becoming uglier and uglier.

    Yes, Kevin, I AM outraged, and I have wept for the past three nights over this... :stone
  5. by   Rustyhammer
    I, too, expect our troops to be of higher standards. While it doesn't surprise us much anymore to hear of Iraqi disregard for civilian life it shocks us to hear that a few of our troops have sunk to a lower level than is expected.
    I don't believe these were the actions of just a few privates. I think that the supervision wasn't there or wasn't appropriate.
    We (the US) now have our foot in a bear trap! Will we gnaw off the limb and hobble off or die trying to pull the maimed foot out?
    -R
  6. by   Spidey's mom
    Kevin - I am outraged and sickened by the beheading of Mr. Berg and the treatment of the contractors in Fallujah.

    I am also outraged at the sentiment that American troops are the SAME as Sadaam regarding torture and murder and rape . . . . .Ted Kennedy made a statement this week that made me so angry I went to his website and wrote a protest email. He needs to apologize to all our troops.

    I completely agree that those 7 (so far) idiots at the Iraqi prison need to be punished and was sick to my stomach about the photos I saw. But the savage beheading of Mr. Berg was so appalling and cruel and to videotape it so his family gets to see . . . . I won't apologize . . that is just worse.

    And our troops, for the most part, should not be compared to SH.

    steph
  7. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    Ted Kennedy needs to evaluate himself before he ever comments on anyone's actions. Of all people, he shouldn't run his mouth.
  8. by   teeituptom
    Yes Im also outraged
    outraged at actions on both sides
    Outraged at Bushie and Cheney for putting us over there
    Outraged at Dumsfield and Powell for their actions and or inactions
    Outraged at the Republican Press coverage, looking more idiotic than ever
  9. by   JMP
    I was outraged when the US first invaded Iraq and remain outraged to this day. I feel sad and disheartened that people die every day in this war on both sides. I think the US had no business going there but know, they are stuck. It is a terrible, awful mess.
  10. by   Spidey's mom
    Kevin's question, it seems to me, has to do with no matter how you stand on the war, are you outraged more by what the terrorists have done to Americans or are you outraged more by what the troops did to Iraqi prisoners? However, I don't want to put words in Kevin's mouth.

    Kevin? What say you?

    steph
  11. by   Energizer Bunny
    I don't think that my outrage has anything to do with politics. I am outraged at the whole situation and saddened beyond belief for Mr. Berg's family. As others have stated, I did expect such behavior from terrorists, but did not expect the abuse that our troops have subjected others' to. I cannot compare them because they are two separate incidents, but both horrifying to me.
  12. by   JMP
    Quote from stevielynn
    Kevin's question, it seems to me, has to do with no matter how you stand on the war, are you outraged more by what the terrorists have done to Americans or are you outraged more by what the troops did to Iraqi prisoners? However, I don't want to put words in Kevin's mouth.

    Kevin? What say you?

    steph
    How can someone compare outrage. People are human, regardless of their nationality. As a person and a nurse, this war has sickened me.
    THis morning on MSNBC I saw the father of Mr. Berg say his son died for the sins of Bush and Rumsfield. My heart aches for his family.

    Sins are sins....regardless of who commits them. What the US has done in Iraq is wrong, what has happened to US citizens as a result is also wrong- two wrongs don't make anything right.

    Someone has to lay down their weapons and stop the madness. The first group to do that, will be right in my mind.
  13. by   gwenith
    I believe that Jnette and others have nailed it - it is about expectations. The minute I heard that we were going to war I expected atrocities to be committed against our troops - not because they are "evil" or a different culture or anything but because ANY time you invade a country there will be people who are resentful of you doing so. Lacking high tech weapons it is natural that these same people fall back on the psychological warfare of guerrilla warfare.

    Unfortunately I also forsaw the abuse by our own troops (note I say our - no-one is immune) of civilians - if not this abuse then there would be some abuse that would feed the fire and cause an increase in retaliation acts.

    Violence breeds violence
  14. by   JMP
    Quote from gwenith
    I believe that Jnette and others have nailed it - it is about expectations. The minute I heard that we were going to war I expected atrocities to be committed against our troops - not because they are "evil" or a different culture or anything but because ANY time you invade a country there will be people who are resentful of you doing so. Lacking high tech weapons it is natural that these same people fall back on the psychological warfare of guerrilla warfare.

    Unfortunately I also forsaw the abuse by our own troops (note I say our - no-one is immune) of civilians - if not this abuse then there would be some abuse that would feed the fire and cause an increase in retaliation acts.

    Violence breeds violence
    Violence does breed violence. Totally agree.

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