Where IS Bin Laden?

  1. I never read this paper before. It seems to be one of the evil "wordy liberal" publications. They ask an interesting question though.
    http://www.gregpalast.com/detail.cfm?artid=220&row=1
    Whatever Happened to Bin Laden? While US Storms Baghdad, Saudi Ties to Al Qaeda Are Unprobed
    The Progressive Populist
    Saturday, March 8, 2003
    On my BBC television show, Newsnight, an American journalist confessed that, since the 9/11 attacks, US reporters are simply too afraid to ask the uncomfortable questions that could kill careers: "It's an obscene comparison, but there was a time in South Africa when people would put flaming tires around people's necks if they dissented. In some ways, the fear is that you will be necklaced here, you will have a flaming tire of lack of patriotism put around your neck," Dan Rather said. Without his makeup, Rather looked drawn, old and defeated in confessing that he too had given in. "It's that fear that keeps journalists from asking the toughest of the tough questions and to continue to bore in on the tough questions so often."

    Investigators were ordered to "back off" from any inquiries into Saudi Arabian financing of terror networks.

    The reports I did based on this information won the Sonoma State University School of Journalism's Project Censored Award in 2002. It's not the kind of prize you want to win -- it's given to crucial stories that were effectively banned from US airwaves and papers. I don't want any misunderstanding here, so I must emphasize what we did not find: We uncovered no information, none whatsoever, that George W. Bush had any advance knowledge of the plan to attack the World Trade Center on 9/11, nor, heaven forbid, any involvement in the attack.

    FBI Document 199I

    What we did discover was serious enough. To begin with, from less-than-happy FBI agents we obtained an interesting document, some 30 pages long, marked "SECRET." I've reproduced a couple of pages in The Best Democracy Money Can Buy [recently reissued in a paperback US edition by Plume]. Note the designation "199I" -- that's FBI-speak for "national security matter." According to insiders, FBI agents had wanted to check into two members of the bin Laden family, Abdullah and Omar, but were told to stay away by superiors -- until September 13, 2001. By then, Abdullah and Omar were long gone from the United States.

    Why no investigation of the brothers bin Laden? The Bush administration's line is the Binladdins (a more common spelling of the Arabic name) are good folk. Osama's the Black Sheep, supposedly cut off from his Saudi kin. But the official line notwithstanding, some FBI agents believed the family had some gray sheep worth questioning -- especially these two working with the World Assembly of Muslim Youth (WAMY), which the file labels "a suspected terrorist organization." ....

    No matter how vile WAMY's indoctrination chats, they are none of the FBI's business. Recruitment for terror, however, is. Before 9/11, the governments of India and the Philippines tied WAMY to groups staging murderous attacks on civilians. Following our broadcast on BBC, the Dutch secret service stated that WAMY, "support(ed) violent activity." In 2002, The Wall Street Journal's Glenn Simpson made public a report by Bosnia's government that a charity with Abdullah bin Laden on its board had channeled money to Chechen guerrillas. Two of the 9/11 hijackers used an address on the same street as WAMY's office in Falls Church, Virginia.

    "Back-Off" Directive and Islamic Bomb

    Click to read entire article.
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  2. 10 Comments

  3. by   Mkue
    That's a good question, where is Bin Ladin? Is he dead or alive and if he's dead is al-qaida using his name?
    Last edit by mkue on May 16, '03
  4. by   pickledpepperRN
    http://www.independent.co.uk/
    Alarm across three continents
    over the relentless al-Qa'ida

    By Rupert Cornwell in Washington

    17 May 2003
    The United States, Britain and Australia - the
    three countries that sent ground troops to
    depose Saddam Hussein - have issued a spate
    of new warnings on possible terrorist attacks in
    Asian, Arab and African countries. But several of
    the countries named are complaining that the
    alerts are unjustified and an overreaction.
    In the most specific warning, the US State
    Department said it had received information that
    an attack could happen "in the near future"
    against "Western interests" in the Alhamra
    district of the Red Sea port of Jeddah in Saudi
    Arabia.
    Some American consular staff and their families
    living there have been moved to new lodgings as
    a precaution.
    The alert came 24 hours after the State
    Department told US citizens to avoid travelling to
    Kenya and other east African countries and
    Britain took the even more drastic step of
    suspending commercial flights to and from
    Kenya.
    At the same time, Australia and New Zealand
    issued their own alert on possible new terrorist
    attacks in south Asia. Last October a nightclub
    full of tourists was bombed in Bali, killing about
    200 people.
    Australians should be "extremely cautious" in
    Thailand, Singapore, the Philippines, East Timor,
    Brunei and Malaysia, the Foreign Ministry in
    Canberra warned.
    Its statement follows a separate American alert for Malaysia, centred on Sabah,
    the Malaysian state on the northern tip of the island of Borneo.
    The series of alerts reflects the abrupt change in mood after three suicide
    attacks in Riyadh on Monday night, and the realisation that Osama bin Laden's
    al-Qa'ida organisation may be down, but certainly not out. Robert Jordan, the
    US ambassador to Saudi Arabia, went so far as to describe that country as "a
    battleground ... rather than a nice place for civilians to live". The synchronised
    and well-planned bombings were "if not the Saudi September 11, certainly the
    Saudis' Pearl Harbor", he said.
    In Washington, Abu al-Jubeir, a senior Saudi Foreign Ministry adviser, said
    there should be no doubt about his country's resolve to find those responsible
    for "this heinous crime".
    Riyadh would learn from its mistakes and co-operate fully with its allies around
    the world to make sure there was no repeat, he assured.
    But for a sceptical America, which has complained about inadequate help from
    the Saudis over past terrorist incidents, the proof of that pudding will be in the
    eating.
    Any Saudi contrition contrasts with a withering response from Malaysia to
    warnings directed to its own soil - which raises the question of whether such
    alerts, if not specific, do more harm than good, by making people less inclined
    to take seriously more precise terrorist threats.
    Mahathir Mohammed, the Malaysian Prime Minister and a strong critic of the
    American-led invasion of Iraq, declared that the insecurity after the Iraq conflict
    had left Washington paranoid.
    "They are afraid of their own shadow, afraid to come here, afraid because they
    know there are many people in this world hating them," he said.
    Thailand's response was also dismissive, but it was couched in the more
    diplomatic language befitting a country heavily dependent on income from
    Western tourism, and which has been hit particularly heavily by the Bali attack.
    There was "nothing to worry about", in Thailand, said Thaksin Sinawatra, the
    Prime Minister.
    Mr Thaksin said he was confident that his country was not a terrorist target,
    since it was not an enemy of any particular terrorist group, and he urged
    Australians not to overreact.
    "I would warn Thais visiting Australia to take care, because that country is a
    target too."
    Last edit by pickledpepperRN on May 16, '03
  5. by   pickledpepperRN
    http://www.herald.ns.ca/stories/2003.../f149.raw.html
    Bin Laden triggered bombings in tape

    By The Sunday Times

    Casablanca - Osama bin Laden singled out Morocco, Saudi Arabia and Pakistan
    as targets for "martyrdom operations" in a chilling audio tape issued only three
    months before the latest string of bombings.

    All three countries were struck by terrorist attacks last week, adding to fears that
    the al-Qaida leader may have ordered a new wave of bombings across the
    world.

    As the death toll in Friday's Casablanca suicide attacks rose to 41, it emerged
    that Morocco was one of six countries identified by bin Laden as "ready for
    liberation" in a section of the tape calling for "martyrdom operations" by Islamic
    extremists.

    "True Muslims should act, incite and mobilize the nation in such great events . . .
    in order to break free from the slavery of these tyrannic and apostate regimes
    enslaved by America," he said. "Among regions ready for liberation are Jordan,
    Morocco, Nigeria, the country of the two shrines (Saudi Arabia), Yemen and
    Pakistan."

    The warning received scant attention from western intelligence agencies, which at
    the time were focused primarily on preparing for the war on Iraq.

    But last Monday Islamic extremists, with suspected links to al-Qaida, carried out
    suicide attacks against expatriate housing compounds in Riyadh, the capital of
    Saudi Arabia, killing 34 people, including eight Americans.

    A series of explosions rocked 21 petrol stations in Pakistan three days later.

    In the latest attack, five bombs, carried by at least 10 suicide terrorists, exploded
    simultaneously in Casablanca late on Friday night, killing over 40 and injuring
    about 100, most of whom were locals.

    The bombers attacked a Spanish social club, a Jewish community centre and
    cemetery, the Belgian consulate and the Safir hotel.

    The blasts came during the popular evening "promenade time" when many
    Moroccans were on the streets. The bombs caused carnage with decapitated
    bodies and wrecked cars littering the streets.

    At least 18 people are thought to have died at the Casa de Espana social club.

    Lamia Haffi, an employee, said three attackers had entered the building after
    slitting the throat of a security guard. Seconds later the club was ripped apart by
    either one or two blasts among the 100 diners.

    Aboubakr Jamai, a Moroccan journalist, described the scene at the club, which is
    popular with Spaniards and foreign diplomats.

    "There are body parts all over the place," he said.

    Witnesses said at least one terrorist had blown himself up with grenades strapped
    to his belt.

    As many as 10 of those killed in the attacks may have been the bombers, the
    Moroccan interior minister said Saturday. Three Moroccans, including one
    suspected suicide bomber, were arrested.

    The blasts in Morocco and Saudi Arabia were being seen in Washington on
    Saturday as an ominous sign that al-Qaida may either have revived in a different
    form, or may be inspiring a new generation of Islamic radicals.

    The latest bombings followed a series of claims by intelligence officials that
    al-Qaida has opened new training camps in east Africa.

    A senior American official claimed that at least one camp had been opened in
    Sudan.

    The renewed terrorist activity has obliged American officials to revise their
    previous optimism that al-Qaida's failure to respond to the U.S. invasion of Iraq
    was a sign that the group was dying.
  6. by   pickledpepperRN
    http://www.newsday.com/news/nationwo...news-headlines
    Top al-Qaida Harbored in Iran

    Source: New attacks ordered from there

    By Knut Royce
    WASHINGTON BUREAU

    May 17, 2003

    Washington - The United States has developed intelligence indicating that top al-Qaida leaders operating inside Iran directed Monday's
    bombing attacks in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, and have ordered a terrorist strike in East Africa, according to counterterrorism sources.

    Intelligence officials say that top operational leader Saif al-Adil, who has been Osama bin Laden's security chief and is hiding in Iran, is apparently under the
    protection of the country's Revolutionary Guards.

    Al-Adil, they said, directed a senior operative, Ali Abed al Rahman al Faq'asi al Ghamdi, also known as Aby Bakr al Azdi, to carry out the Riyadh suicide bombings
    of three housing compounds, which killed 34, including eight Americans and nine attackers.

    An al-Adil lieutenant, Abdullah Ahmed Abdullah, also known as Abu Mohamed al-Masri, and also operating out of Iran, directed an al-Qaida cell in East Africa to
    carry out attacks there, intelligence officials said.

    The State Department this week issued an advisory urging Americans to avoid traveling to East Africa, and in particular Kenya. The British government has banned
    flights in and out of Kenya. One of the concerns is that the terrorists would try to shoot down an airliner.

    A source who received a classified briefing on Friday said the Bush administration now is in a quandary because it can't ignore the intelligence but at the same time
    wants to continue pressing the Iranians to stay out of Iraq.

    "The subject of Iran harboring senior al-Qaida people has suddenly been pushed to the top of the agenda" in the Bush administration, he said.

    The CIA declined to comment on what role al-Qaida figures inside Iran may have had in recent bombings or in anticipated attacks or to identify who the operatives
    are. "I don't have anything to say about this," said spokesman Mark Mansfield.

    An administration official close to the CIA confirmed, however, that al-Ghamdi, a Saudi native, appears to have played a "very big role" in the Riyadh attacks.

    Saudi officials have named another al-Qaida operative, Khalid Jehani, as a leader of the cell that carried out the attacks. Both Jehani and al-Ghamdi fled Afghanistan
    when the United States bombed the Tora Bora mountains in December 2001.

    There were some indications this week that the United States may be ready to confront Iran over its hosting of al-Qaida leaders. On Wednesday, National Security
    Adviser Condoleezza Rice told reporters that the administration was "concerned about al-Qaida operating in Iran." But she made no mention of any link between
    Iran and the Saudi attacks.

    The following day, Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld said, "We know there is senior al-Qaida in Iran." He, too, did not elaborate.

    The Iranian foreign ministry on Friday denied that Iran is harboring al-Qaida operatives. U.S. intelligence sources said that other top al-Qaida leaders believed to be
    inside Iran include bin Laden's heir apparent, his son Saad, as well as Abu Hafs the Mauritanian.

    Copyright 2003, Newsday, Inc.
  7. by   pickledpepperRN
    http://www.abcnews.go.com/wire/World...30516_230.html
    May 16

    -- By Parinoosh Arami

    TEHRAN (Reuters) - Iranian government officials strongly denied on Friday that Iran was producing weapons of mass destruction or was sheltering members of Osama bin Laden's
    al Qaeda network.

    A senior government official denied allegations by an exile opposition group, the National Council of Resistance of Iran, that Tehran had biological weapons armed with anthrax,
    smallpox and typhoid.

    "I strongly deny that we have biological weapons because we do not need any banned weapons," the official, who asked not to be identified, told Reuters.

    President Bush has dubbed Iran part of an "axis of evil" and accused the Tehran government of sponsoring terrorism and developing nuclear arms.

    Bush's national security adviser, Condoleezza Rice, reiterated U.S. criticism of Iran on Wednesday, accusing it of being one of the world's leading "sponsors of terror."

    She said the United States had raised alarms about Iran's nuclear weapons programs and also believed it allowed al Qaeda to operate from its territory.

    Iran's Foreign Ministry spokesman Hamid Reza Asefi rejected those accusations on Friday as "baseless."

    "The Islamic Republic of Iran, based on its own principles, is very serious and resolved to combat terrorism and its nuclear programs are very transparent and peaceful," Asefi was
    quoted by the official IRNA news agency as saying.

    The agency also said Asefi rejected U.S. accusations that leaders of al Qaeda were living in Iran. The United States blames the group for the September 11, 2001 attacks in New York
    and Washington.

    The National Council of Resistance of Iran, the political wing of the People's Mujahideen Organisation, provided a list of names and places at a Washington news conference on
    Thursday where it said biological weapons were being produced.

    The group, which previously exposed the existence of Iran's Natanz uranium enrichment facility the United States says is part of a nuclear weapons program, did not provide any
    evidence to back up its new claims on biological weapons, but said its information came from Iranian government sources.

    The Iraq-based Iranian rebel group started surrendering to the U.S. military last week under a deal that effectively ends it operations as a fighting force.

    "The Mujahideen are making these accusations against Iran because of the recent U.S. pressure on them," the Iranian official who declined to be identified said on Friday.

    Iran insists its ambitious nuclear program is purely for the peaceful generation of electricity.

    A U.S.-led war launched in March against Iran's western neighbor, Iraq, toppled the government of Saddam Hussein. Washington had accused Baghdad of developing banned
    weapons of mass destruction.

    Copyright 2003 Reuters News Service. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.
    Copyright 2002 ABC News Internet Ventures.
  8. by   Mkue
    I heard he might be in Pakistan or in a cave somewhere, if he's alive. It will be a great day if he's ever captured alive.
  9. by   pickledpepperRN
    http://www.herald.ns.ca/stories/2003.../f149.raw.html
    Sunday, May 18, 2003

    The Halifax Herald Limited


    Bin Laden triggered bombings in tape

    By The Sunday Times

    Casablanca - Osama bin Laden singled out Morocco, Saudi Arabia and Pakistan
    as targets for "martyrdom operations" in a chilling audio tape issued only three
    months before the latest string of bombings.

    All three countries were struck by terrorist attacks last week, adding to fears that
    the al-Qaida leader may have ordered a new wave of bombings across the
    world.

    As the death toll in Friday's Casablanca suicide attacks rose to 41, it emerged
    that Morocco was one of six countries identified by bin Laden as "ready for
    liberation" in a section of the tape calling for "martyrdom operations" by Islamic
    extremists.

    "True Muslims should act, incite and mobilize the nation in such great events . . .
    in order to break free from the slavery of these tyrannic and apostate regimes
    enslaved by America," he said. "Among regions ready for liberation are Jordan,
    Morocco, Nigeria, the country of the two shrines (Saudi Arabia), Yemen and
    Pakistan."

    The warning received scant attention from western intelligence agencies, which at
    the time were focused primarily on preparing for the war on Iraq.

    But last Monday Islamic extremists, with suspected links to al-Qaida, carried out
    suicide attacks against expatriate housing compounds in Riyadh, the capital of
    Saudi Arabia, killing 34 people, including eight Americans.

    A series of explosions rocked 21 petrol stations in Pakistan three days later.

    In the latest attack, five bombs, carried by at least 10 suicide terrorists, exploded
    simultaneously in Casablanca late on Friday night, killing over 40 and injuring
    about 100, most of whom were locals.

    The bombers attacked a Spanish social club, a Jewish community centre and
    cemetery, the Belgian consulate and the Safir hotel.

    The blasts came during the popular evening "promenade time" when many
    Moroccans were on the streets. The bombs caused carnage with decapitated
    bodies and wrecked cars littering the streets.

    At least 18 people are thought to have died at the Casa de Espana social club.

    Lamia Haffi, an employee, said three attackers had entered the building after
    slitting the throat of a security guard. Seconds later the club was ripped apart by
    either one or two blasts among the 100 diners.

    Aboubakr Jamai, a Moroccan journalist, described the scene at the club, which is
    popular with Spaniards and foreign diplomats.

    "There are body parts all over the place," he said.

    Witnesses said at least one terrorist had blown himself up with grenades strapped
    to his belt.

    As many as 10 of those killed in the attacks may have been the bombers, the
    Moroccan interior minister said Saturday. Three Moroccans, including one
    suspected suicide bomber, were arrested.

    The blasts in Morocco and Saudi Arabia were being seen in Washington on
    Saturday as an ominous sign that al-Qaida may either have revived in a different
    form, or may be inspiring a new generation of Islamic radicals.

    The latest bombings followed a series of claims by intelligence officials that
    al-Qaida has opened new training camps in east Africa.

    A senior American official claimed that at least one camp had been opened in
    Sudan.

    The renewed terrorist activity has obliged American officials to revise their
    previous optimism that al-Qaida's failure to respond to the U.S. invasion of Iraq
    was a sign that the group was dying.
  10. by   pickledpepperRN
    http://www.smh.com.au/articles/2003/...885447467.html
    May 18 2003


    Almost half of al-Qaeda's leadership has been captured or killed, US President George W Bush
    said yesterday, after a week that began with bombings in Saudi Arabia and ended with bomb
    attacks in Morocco.

    "The enemies of freedom are not idle, and neither are we," Bush said in his weekly radio
    address.

    The pre-recorded broadcast came the morning after a string of bomb attacks in the Moroccan
    city of Casablanca killed at least 39 people.

    "From Pakistan to the Philippines, to the Horn of Africa, we are hunting down al-Qaeda killers,"
    Bush said.

    "So far, nearly one-half of al-Qaeda's senior operatives have been captured or killed," he said,
    pledging to "remain on the hunt until they are all brought to justice."
  11. by   pickledpepperRN
    http://www.guardian.co.uk/alqaida/st...028044,00.html
    Inside story of the hunt for Bin Laden

    The al-Qaida leader is said to be hiding in northern Pakistan guarded by a 120-mile ring of tribesmen whose job it is to warn of the approach of any troops. Rory McCarthy reports

    Saturday August 23, 2003
    The Guardian <http://www.guardian.co.uk>

    Early in March, intelligence agents searching the western deserts of Pakistan thought they had finally tracked down the world's most wanted man. A convoy was spotted racing along one of the remote smugglers' routes which winds down from southern Afghanistan, through the sand dunes of Pakistani Baluchistan and into Iran. American intelligence agents had a tip that Osama bin Laden was in the group.
    They seemed to have reason to be optimistic. Five days earlier Pakistani officers had scored the biggest success so far in the hunt for Bin Laden and his al-Qaida deputies. In a midnight raid they had arrested a ragged-looking Khalid Sheikh Mohammad, the Pakistani Kuwaiti who was regarded as the third most senior figure in Bin Laden's network, a man described by the jubilant authorities in Islamabad as a "kingpin of al-Qaida." ...
  12. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    Not sure where Binny is but i have an excellent recommendation for new lodgings when he is captured

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