Where? How?

  1. Halliburton theft ups terror fears
    Fears of a 'dirty bomb' arise with theft of oil services firm's
    radioactive device in Africa.
    March 6, 2003: 1:57 PM EST

    NEW YORK (Reuters) - Halliburton Co., the world's No.
    2 oil field services firm, said Thursday it has started a
    probe involving U.S. and Nigerian government officials
    over theft of a radioactive device used at its Nigerian
    operations.

    A report by the Wall Street Journal Thursday said officials
    were concerned that the device's radioactive material could be
    used to create a "dirty bomb," an explosive device designed
    to scatter radioactivity in a densely populated area.

    According to one expert, if the
    device's radioactive material
    were combined with a pound
    of TNT and exploded, an area
    covering 60 city blocks would
    be contaminated with a
    radiation dose in excess of
    safety guidelines of the
    Environmental Protection
    Agency, the newspaper
    reported.

    "We are working with the Nigerian government, the
    International Atomic Energy Agency and U.S. authorities to
    locate the missing materials. We made the local public aware
    promptly after discovering the tools were not in the proper
    location," Halliburton said in a statement to CNNfn. "We are
    currently investigating the situation. These materials are used
    in a tool for a service that helps provide down-hole data
    about a well."

    The device was in a locked
    storage box that weighs about
    200 pounds and is the size of
    a small car engine block.

    The newspaper said the theft
    occurred between the Nigerian towns of Wari and Port
    Harcourt in the Niger Delta, in the heart of the West African
    country's oil producing region. IAEA officials have been in
    Nigeria for two weeks but so far have been unable to
    determine how the device was stolen, the Journal quoted an
    IAEA official as saying.

    Shares of Halliburton (HAL: up $0.22 to $20.22, Research,
    Estimates) rose in midday trading.

    Vice President Dick Cheney was chairman and CEO of
    Halliburton, which provides products and services to the
    petroleum and energy industries, from 1995 to 2000.


    Copyright 2003 Reuters All rights reserved.
    •  
  2. 5 Comments

  3. by   Mkue
    Originally posted by spacenurse

    "We are currently investigating the situation.
    And I hope the investigation is successfull.
  4. by   pickledpepperRN
    Me too!
    These are the 'interesting times' of the old curse.
  5. by   pickledpepperRN
    http://www.nytimes.com/2003/03/08/in...t&position=top
    March 8, 2003

    North Korean Fliers Said to Have Sought Hostages

    By ERIC SCHMITT

    WASHINGTON, March 7-The North Korean fighter jets that intercepted an unarmed American spy plane over the Sea of Japan last weekend were
    trying to force the aircraft to land in North Korea and seize its crew, a senior defense official said today.
    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    http://truthout.org/docs_03/022803A.shtml

    Thursday 27 February 2003

    "In the counsels of Government, we must guard against the acquisition of unwarranted influence,
    whether sought or unsought, by the Military Industrial Complex. The potential for the disastrous rise of
    misplaced power exists, and will persist. We must never let the weight of this combination endanger our
    liberties or democratic processes."
    - President Dwight Eisenhower, January 1961.

    George W. Bush gave a speech Wednesday night before the Godfather of conservative Washington think tanks, the
    American Enterprise Institute. In his speech, Bush quantified his coming war with Iraq as part of a larger struggle to bring
    pro-western governments into power in the Middle East. Couched in hopeful language describing peace and freedom for all, the
    speech was in fact the closest articulation of the actual plan for Iraq that has yet been heard from the administration.
    PNAC has funneled millions of taxpayer dollars to a Hussein opposition group called the Iraqi National Congress, and to Iraq's
    heir-apparent, Ahmed Chalabi, despite the fact that Chalabi was sentenced in absentia by a Jordanian court to 22 years in prison
    on 31 counts of bank fraud. Chalabi and the INC have, over the years, gathered support for their cause by promising oil contracts
    to anyone that would help to put them in power in Iraq.
    Who is PNAC? Its members include:

    * Vice President Dick Cheney, one of the PNAC founders, who served as Secretary of Defense for Bush
    Sr.;

    * I. Lewis Libby, Cheney's top national security assistant;

    * Secretary of Defense Donald Rumsfeld, also a founding member, along with four of his chief aides
    including;

    * Deputy Secretary of Defense Paul Wolfowitz, arguably the ideological father of the group;

    * Eliot Abrams, prominent member of Bush's National Security Council, who was pardoned by Bush Sr.
    in the Iran/Contra scandal;

    * John Bolton, who serves as Undersecretary for Arms Control and International Security in the Bush
    administration;

    * Richard Perle, former Reagan administration official and present chairman of the powerful Defense
    Policy Board;

    * Randy Scheunemann, President of the Committee for the Liberation of Iraq, who was Trent Lott's
    national security aide and who served as an advisor to Rumsfeld on Iraq in 2001;

    * Bruce Jackson, Chairman of PNAC, a position he took after serving for years as vice president of
    weapons manufacturer Lockheed-Martin, and who also headed the Republican Party Platform
    subcommittee for National Security and Foreign Policy during the 2000 campaign. His section of the 2000
    GOP Platform explicitly called for the removal of Saddam Hussein;

    * William Kristol, noted conservative writer for the Weekly Standard, a magazine owned along with the
    Fox News Network by conservative media mogul Ruppert Murdoch.

    The Project for the New American Century seeks to establish what they call 'Pax Americana' across the globe. Essentially,
    their goal is to transform America, the sole remaining superpower, into a planetary empire by force of arms. A report released by
    PNAC in September of 2000 entitled 'Rebuilding America's Defenses' codifies this plan, which requires a massive increase in
    defense spending and the fighting of several major theater wars in order to establish American dominance. The first has been
    achieved in Bush's new budget plan, which calls for the exact dollar amount to be spent on defense that was requested by PNAC
    in 2000. Arrangements are underway for the fighting of the wars.

    The men from PNAC are in a perfect position to see their foreign policy schemes, hatched in 1997, brought into reality. They
    control the White House, the Pentagon and Defense Department, by way of this the armed forces and intelligence communities,
    and have at their feet a Republican-dominated Congress that will rubber-stamp virtually everything on their wish list.
    t is well known by now that Dick Cheney, before becoming Vice President, served as chairman and chief executive of the
    Dallas-based petroleum corporation Halliburton. During his tenure, according to oil industry executives and United Nations
    records, Halliburton did a brisk $73 million in business with Saddam Hussein's Iraq. While working face-to-face with Hussein,
    Cheney and Halliburton were also moving into position to capitalize upon Hussein's removal from power. In October of 1995, the
    same month Cheney was made CEO of Halliburton, that company announced a deal that would put it first in line should war
    break out in Iraq. Their job: To take control of burning oil wells, put out the fires, and prepare them for service.
    There are a number of depths to be plumbed in all of this. The Bush administration has claimed all along that this war with
    Iraq is about Saddam Hussein's connections to terrorism and weapons of mass destruction, though through it all they have
    roundly failed to establish any basis for either accusation. On Wednesday, Bush went further to claim that the war is about
    liberating the Iraqi people and bringing democracy to the Middle East. This ignores cultural realities on the ground in Iraq and
    throughout the region that, salted with decades of deep mistrust for American motives, make such a democracy movement
    brought at the point of the sword utterly impossible to achieve.

    This movement, cloaked in democracy, is in fact a PNAC-inspired push for an American global empire. It behooves
    Americans to understand that there is a great difference between being the citizen of a constitutional democracy and being a
    citizen of an empire. The establishment of an empire requires some significant sacrifices.

    Essential social, medical, educational and retirement services will have to be gutted so that those funds can be directed
    towards a necessary military buildup. Actions taken abroad to establish the preeminence of American power, most specifically in
    the Middle East, will bring a torrent of terrorist attacks to the home front. Such attacks will bring about the final suspension of
    constitutional rights and the rule of habeas corpus, as we will find ourselves under martial law. In the end, however, this may be
    inevitable. An empire cannot function with the slow, cumbersome machine of a constitutional democracy on its back. Empires
    must be ruled with speed and ruthlessness, in a manner utterly antithetical to the way in which America has been governed for
    227 years.

    And yes, of course, a great many people will die.
  6. by   maureeno
    Halliburton!
    hmmm, didn't they also get the Afghan pipeline too?
  7. by   pickledpepperRN
    IRAN?
    And they have nukes too?

    http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/americas/2838517.stm
    http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/americas/2832169.stm
    http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/americas/1559913.stm
    http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/americas/1084710.stm
    Iran diplomat summoned in bomb row
    The Argentine foreign minister has summoned Iran's top diplomat in a growing row over the deadly bombing of a Jewish community
    centre in Buenos Aries in 1994.

    It comes after Iran threatened to take "appropriate measures" after an Argentinean judge sought the arrest of four Iranian officials for alleged involvement
    in the attack.

    Some 85 people were killed and hundreds more wounded when a car bomb blew up outside the building in the city's Jewish district.

    The Argentine intelligence service has long believed Iran was behind the attack, a charge Iran has denied.

    'Baseless allegations'

    Iran reacted angrily after the judge asked Interpol to arrest: Ali Fallahian, the former Iranian intelligence minister Mohsen Rabbani, the former cultural
    attache at the Iranian Embassy in Buenos Aires Ali Balesh Abadi, a diplomat Ali Akbar Parvaresh, a former education minister.

    Iranian Foreign Ministry spokesman Hamid-Reza Asefi accused Israel of being behind the "baseless allegations".

    "There has been no convincing proof of Iran's involvement in that incident, and we have repeatedly said that these rumours and reports are made up by
    Zionist circles," he said.

    The official Iranian news agency IRNA quoted Iranian Vice-Foreign Minister Ali Ahani as saying Iran "does not tolerate such acts and will take appropriate
    measures... to obtain reparation".

    Interpol role

    Argentine Foreign Minister Carlos Ruckhauf summoned the Iranian charge d'affaires Mohammad Ali Tabatabaei for an explanation.

    Mr Ruckhauf said he told Mr Tabatabaei the Argentine Government was not involved with the request for the men's arrests.

    "This is a case being investigated by a judge not by the government and we hope Iran understands that," he said.

    Reuters news agency quoted an unnamed Argentine foreign ministry official as saying Mr Tabatabaei had said it was "too early" to say what his
    government meant by "appropriate measures".

    Interpol said it was studying the request for the men's arrests.

    No-one has been charged over the bombing, the worst act of terror in the country's history.

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