Unessecary ER visits

  1. Interesting article. I know my home town actually attached a sort of walk in clinic to the ER to try to deal with this. The triage nurse would either send you left (to ER) or right (to walk in clinic area).

    http://www.cbc.ca/story/canada/natio...n20050913.html
    Report says most ER visits not emergencies
    CTV.ca News Staff

    The majority of patients who visit Canadian emergency rooms do not require urgent medical attention, says a new report released today by the Canadian Institute for Health Information.
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  2. 13 Comments

  3. by   Spidey's mom
    We started a walk-in clinic too. Actually our doc's office is a few steps away from the hospital itself and the ER doc sleeps in the back room/bedroom of that office.

    We cannot however after a patient shows up for an ER visit send them anywhere else.

    The clinic has been advertised though. And we mention it in our discharge talk with the patients or on nurse calls - you can't give advice but you can say that the clinic is open as it the ER and it is up to the patient.

    Our non-er visits have lessened . . . however they still come.

    steph
  4. by   URO-RN
    Quote from fergus51
    Interesting article. I know my home town actually attached a sort of walk in clinic to the ER to try to deal with this. The triage nurse would either send you left (to ER) or right (to walk in clinic area).

    http://www.cbc.ca/story/canada/natio...n20050913.html
    Report says most ER visits not emergencies
    CTV.ca News Staff

    The majority of patients who visit Canadian emergency rooms do not require urgent medical attention, says a new report released today by the Canadian Institute for Health Information.
    Interesting post.
    I just saw this on MSN: http://moneycentral.msn.com/content/...0.asp?GT1=6963

    It would be interesting to compare/contrast ...
  5. by   fergus51
    Quote from URO-RN
    Interesting post.
    I just saw this on MSN: http://moneycentral.msn.com/content/...0.asp?GT1=6963

    It would be interesting to compare/contrast ...
    It would be. Lucky for Canadians, they don't get charged for non-emergent visits so finances usually don't factor into their decisions to get treatment at the ER or the doc's office.
  6. by   Roy Fokker
    Quote from stevielynn
    We started a walk-in clinic too. Actually our doc's office is a few steps away from the hospital itself and the ER doc sleeps in the back room/bedroom of that office.

    We cannot however after a patient shows up for an ER visit send them anywhere else.

    The clinic has been advertised though. And we mention it in our discharge talk with the patients or on nurse calls - you can't give advice but you can say that the clinic is open as it the ER and it is up to the patient.

    Our non-er visits have lessened . . . however they still come.

    steph
    Could it be because you work at a rural hospital?

    I'm thinking patient loads and familiarity with population...
  7. by   Spidey's mom
    Quote from Roy Fokker
    Could it be because you work at a rural hospital?

    I'm thinking patient loads and familiarity with population...
    Probably! :-)

    steph
  8. by   fab4fan
    Quote from fergus51
    It would be. Lucky for Canadians, they don't get charged for non-emergent visits so finances usually don't factor into their decisions to get treatment at the ER or the doc's office.
    One time when I was in Toronto, I got a terrible migraine and had to go to the ED.

    My total bill for services: $19.75

    Another funny thing happened on that trip. I went there to see a neurologist to see if I could get Imitrex (it wasn't available in the US at the time). When I went to pay the bill, the secretary said, "Oh, we'll just try to bill your insurance. I don't know if it will work since your ins. is in the US." I asked her if she wanted some sort of down payment, and she said, "No, if we don't get paid we'll get in touch with you somehow."

    Never got a bill.

    When I went to get the Rx filled, the pharm. told me how much the med was going to be going for in the US (it was soon to be released). It was hundreds of dollars more in the US. When I asked why, he said "Well, we're not allowed to gouge people the way drug companies do to you guys in the US."
  9. by   grannynurse FNP student
    Quote from fab4fan
    One time when I was in Toronto, I got a terrible migraine and had to go to the ED.

    My total bill for services: $19.75

    Another funny thing happened on that trip. I went there to see a neurologist to see if I could get Imitrex (it wasn't available in the US at the time). When I went to pay the bill, the secretary said, "Oh, we'll just try to bill your insurance. I don't know if it will work since your ins. is in the US." I asked her if she wanted some sort of down payment, and she said, "No, if we don't get paid we'll get in touch with you somehow."

    Never got a bill.

    When I went to get the Rx filled, the pharm. told me how much the med was going to be going for in the US (it was soon to be released). It was hundreds of dollars more in the US. When I asked why, he said "Well, we're not allowed to gouge people the way drug companies do to you guys in the US."
    Actual Canada has formularies and sets the price for its drugs. Drug companies cannot, as the druggest said, gouge its population. Nor pass on the advertising cost.

    Grannynurse
  10. by   fergus51
    It's a different world Fab. I have said many times that right now I prefer to be a nurse here in the US (will probably go back to Canada in another 2 years or so), but if I get sick I would rather be a patient in Canada. I couldn't afford it down here.

    Along the same lines, there was an article on CNN showing that availability of follow up care post er visit was very dependent on payment as well.
  11. by   fab4fan
    Things are different, Tracy.

    When I decided to go to Canada to see if I could get the med, I had no idea how to go about getting a doctor. I called "Information" in Toronto, then asked if they had a number for the Canadian Medical Assn.

    Then I called that number and talked to a very nice woman and explained my situation. She listed several docs with a very good rep. in Toronto, then suggested I check one out in particular. (It was funny because I heard her ask her co-workers, "Hey, there's someone on the line that wants to see a neuro. in Toronto..." and people were all calling out different names. Can't say that would happen if I called the AMA...they'd probably think I was cracked.)

    So I went to that doc. As it turned out, he was a very highly regarded neuro, professor at the one med. school, etc. You should have seen his office...someone of that stature you'd expect to have a fancy, mahogany wood filled office. Not this guy. Just a really small office, one secretary, no office nurses, and it was really cute...his exam room/office was decorated with fingerpaintings his kids did. He was the most down-to-earth guy you'd ever want to meet. He spent quite a lot of time with me, never made me feel rushed. (He was a little curious how I came to be his pt., though.)

    If I remember correctly, I think my bill (pd. by ins.) was around $60.
    Last edit by fab4fan on Sep 14, '05
  12. by   grannynurse FNP student
    Quote from fab4fan
    Things are different, Tracy.

    When I decided to go to Canada to see if I could get the med, I had no idea how to go about getting a doctor. I called "Information" in Toronto, then asked if they had a number for the Canadian Medical Assn.

    Then I called that number and talked to a very nice woman and explained my situation. She listed several docs with a very good rep. in Toronto, then suggested I check one out in particular. (It was funny because I heard her ask her co-workers, "Hey, there's someone on the line that wants to see a neuro. in Toronto..." and people were all calling out different names. Can't say that would happen if I called the AMA...they'd probably think I was cracked.)

    So I went to that doc. As it turned out, he was a very highly regarded neuro, professor at the one med. school, etc. You should have seen his office...someone of that stature you'd expect to have a fancy, mahogany wood filled office. Not this guy. Just a really small office, one secretary, no office nurses, and it was really cute...his exam room/office was decorated with fingerpaintings his kids did. He was the most down-to-earth guy you'd ever want to meet. He spent quite a lot of time with me, never made me feel rushed. (He was a little curious how I came to be his pt., though.)

    If I remember correctly, I think my bill (pd. by ins.) was around $60.
    Hate to burst your ballon but the AMA would not think you were cracked, although I would advise calling your state or county medical association. I called provincial medical society, who gave me several names. Seeing a Canadian physician and getting three months worth of medications, cost me under $400, Canadian. Sure beats paying $1500 for the same medications here in the US.

    Grannynurse
  13. by   fab4fan
    I tried that when I was looking for a dentist; the local dentists' association refused..."wouldn't be appropriate to show preference for one over the other."



    We could learn a lot from other countries when it comes to medicine (and many other things, for that matter).
  14. by   grannynurse FNP student
    [QUOTE=fab4fan]I tried that when I was looking for a dentist; the local dentists' association refused..."wouldn't be appropriate to show preference for one over the other."



    I have never had a problem I ask for the names of three physician, in the specialty I require. Either that or when having surgery, I ask the physician I trust who he would have if it were him.

    Grannynurse

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