Took my daughter in for simple procedure

  1. This AM I took my 9 yr old daughter in to get a wart on her finger removed. I didn't want to take her out of school, but that was the only time they could get her in. So, the doc informs us that he will cut some of the dead skin from the wart off and then freeze the rest and it might take 2-3 times of retreating this to be successful. Not a problem. My daughter is pretty tough - has never cried in front of anyone (until now). After the Freezing, she stands up to get some candy out of docs office and she stops and closes her eyes. She turns a very strange yellow ashy color then to grey and her legs went out from under her. I caught her and set her in a chair. Doc came back in and said "Ok, peanut, time to stop faking it." (He's a family friend of ours on top of it.) I told him she has never faked anything like this before so this was real. When she started talking she said that she had no hearing.

    I was like WOW! I knew what was going on with her epinephrine response. But holy moly!!!! It sure was cool to watch! She didn't think so of course but it had to be done - just didn't know her response would be like that.

    I knew doc felt bad after he found out that nothing like that had ever happened like that to her or that she had never faked anything like that before either.

    I didn't take her back to school because she is still lightheaded and woozy. Wow.
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  2. 19 Comments

  3. by   pagandeva2000
    I hope that your daughter feels better. I know that was a strange experience for her, as well as her doctor.
  4. by   ♪♫ in my ♥
    Quote from struglinstudnt
    ...It sure was cool to watch! She didn't think so of course but it had to be done...
    Perhaps cool to watch in somebody else's kid -- I'll be delighted to never see another medical procedure nor its results on my own daughter.

    I trust she's fine and right back in school.
  5. by   coolpeach
    That had to be scary. My son had a wart on his thumb and was terrified to go to the Dr. I bought the do it yourself freezer at CVS, and it worked perfect. Took 30 seconds literally, and we covered it with a bandaid. He said it didn't hurt at all, but felt cold. About 4 days later it just fell off. It's been almost a year, and it hasn't come back.
  6. by   rph3664
    I had a similar reaction to a tetanus shot some years back. I was out paying my copay and mentioned that my arm felt weird. Next thing I knew, I was laying in the back hallway and the nurse said my face was the color of the wall (white, of course).

    To everyone's surprise, I snapped right out of it and drove myself home about a half hour later.
  7. by   leslie :-D
    i must admit, i find your reaction (wow, cool...) a bit bizarre.
    if my dtr turned all colors of gray and yellow and collapsed, i'd be downright concerned.
    did anyone take her vitals?
    i'm relieved to hear she's doing ok now.

    leslie
  8. by   busy-bee
    My oldest son who is 21 drops to his knees after injections. I had a hard time getting the doctor to believe this, but they found out. He was so sick, having projectile emesis, dehydrated quickly. Took him to the doctor in which they administer phenergan IM. The boy is almost six foot tall and I told those nurses how he reacts to injections...but they had to see it to believe it. He gets up off the table and starts walking...just walking without any intent of direction...and I try to direct him down the hall but he has no idea what is going on. I called to the nurse he was going down. Never seen so many nurses run so fast...to put the wheel chair behind him. Next time hopefully they will remember him...or believe me. He did make it to the wheel chair safely thank goodness.
  9. by   Larry in Florida
    Quote from busy-bee
    My oldest son who is 21 drops to his knees after injections. I had a hard time getting the doctor to believe this, but they found out. He was so sick, having projectile emesis, dehydrated quickly. Took him to the doctor in which they administer phenergan IM. The boy is almost six foot tall and I told those nurses how he reacts to injections...but they had to see it to believe it. He gets up off the table and starts walking...just walking without any intent of direction...and I try to direct him down the hall but he has no idea what is going on. I called to the nurse he was going down. Never seen so many nurses run so fast...to put the wheel chair behind him. Next time hopefully they will remember him...or believe me. He did make it to the wheel chair safely thank goodness.
    vagal responses. Not good idea for sitting. Must be put flat with legs up. Some times O2 given.

    Larry RN in Fl
  10. by   dabuchan
    Larry's right, my son goes as white as a sheet, gets real pasty then faints after any blood being drawn or having any kind of needle injections. It's a vagal response and he's old enough now to just tell the medical personel that this will occur (we thought this would pass as he got older and developed into a big football player) lying down during and after the injection has saved him a few falls.
  11. by   SICU Queen
    Quote from struglinstudnt
    This AM I took my 9 yr old daughter in to get a wart on her finger removed. I didn't want to take her out of school, but that was the only time they could get her in. So, the doc informs us that he will cut some of the dead skin from the wart off and then freeze the rest and it might take 2-3 times of retreating this to be successful. Not a problem. My daughter is pretty tough - has never cried in front of anyone (until now). After the Freezing, she stands up to get some candy out of docs office and she stops and closes her eyes. She turns a very strange yellow ashy color then to grey and her legs went out from under her. I caught her and set her in a chair. Doc came back in and said "Ok, peanut, time to stop faking it." (He's a family friend of ours on top of it.) I told him she has never faked anything like this before so this was real. When she started talking she said that she had no hearing.

    I was like WOW! I knew what was going on with her epinephrine response. But holy moly!!!! It sure was cool to watch! She didn't think so of course but it had to be done - just didn't know her response would be like that.

    I knew doc felt bad after he found out that nothing like that had ever happened like that to her or that she had never faked anything like that before either.

    I didn't take her back to school because she is still lightheaded and woozy. Wow.
    Watching your daughter vagal and pass out was cool to watch? Seriously?

  12. by   Duckyaryj
    In defense of the OP, Im sure she was quite concerned about her dtr as this was happening, but its after the fact that the incident was "cool to watch." Like when your pt starts to go down hill when your a student, during the incident your scared to death but after you sit down and let it digest you think to yourself "wow, that was pretty cool!!"
  13. by   ItsyBitsySpider
    I think it's different when it's a patient you don't know vs. your child. I'm having a hard time understanding it being cool to watch your child turn grey and drop. I've seen many a patient, young and old, vagal and hit the floor but I'd probably drop right behind her if it was my daughter.
  14. by   TrudyRN
    Well, to each his own but I would not take a kid out of school to get a wart removed, and it is definitely not "cool" to watch one's child pass out.

    I hope your dtr is ok.

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