Thats a stupid question brainiac

  1. there is always a question, or two that you would like to ask but are afraid you would be embarrassed to ask such a stupid or silly question. how about this: you can ask a stupid or silly question if you can answer some one else's stupid or silly question; that way you will not feel so bad!

    for example here is my question:

    "why can't dogs eat chocolate? i mean i know 'its bad for them' but why is it bad for dogs specifically?" i am trying to avoid a "stupid" answer like "duh, because it is bad for them!" with no explanation...)

    also, if you can correctly answer a question that another person answered incorrectly you are entitled to ask two stupid questions. for example:

    if some one asked "if a tree falls in the forest and no one is there to hear it, will it make a sound?" and some one answered, "yes! of course, just because some one is not there does not mean it will not make a sound!" wrong! the correct answer is no. why? because sound is the interpretation of sound waves by ones ear...if no one is there to interpret the sound waves then there is no sound... gets it?

    so the first person to answer my stupid question about dogs eating chocolate can ask their own stupid question (without feeling bad)
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  2. 41 Comments

  3. by   chris_at_lucas_RN
    Quote from heartsopenwide
    for example here is my question:

    “why can’t dogs eat chocolate? i mean i know ‘its bad for them’ but why is it bad for dogs specifically?" i am trying to avoid a “stupid” answer like “duh, because it is bad for them!” with no explanation…)
    i didn't think that was a stupid question!

    my vet says the biggest problem is that they are not equipped to handle the onslaught of a large amount of refined sugar, so their blood sugar skyrockets.

    actually, i've had my dogs get into my chocolate and not have a problem, but then, i don't give it to them on a regular basis (i don't give it to them at all!) and the most anybody got (that i know of) was about 25 or 30 chocolate chips.

    i'll pass my right to two stupid questions to somebody else. i can't think of any right now....

    (great thread, thought it was a good question too!)
    Last edit by chris_at_lucas_RN on Oct 21, '05
  4. by   SmilingBluEyes
    Moved to breakroom. Enjoy!
  5. by   Jessy_RN
    Quote from heartsopenwide

    for example here is my question:

    “why can’t dogs eat chocolate? i mean i know ‘its bad for them’ but why is it bad for dogs specifically?" i am trying to avoid a “stupid” answer like “duh, because it is bad for them!” with no explanation…)
    the reason why chocolate can be lethal for a dog is because the cocoa bean, from which chocolate is produced, contains a drug called "theobromine". this is closely related to caffeine, which chocolate also contains. the toxicity of chocolate for dogs is due to its theobromine content. chocolate poisoning is very dangerous and should be taken serious. it contains a long lasting, very potent toxin that can cause death.



    my question would have to come from a sig line i saw a couple weeks back.

    if we supposedly evoluted from apes, then why are they still here? (plese be kind....lol!)
    Last edit by Jessy_RN on Oct 21, '05
  6. by   mercyteapot
    Well, to be technical, we actually evolved from arthropods, as did apes. The question is still relevant, though, because there are still many species of arthropods alive today. Their body layout has evolved into many forms and has been adapted for different functions. Those that haven't evolved had no need for those functions. The same goes for apes.

    Now for mine. It is something I've pondered since early childhood. If your parents had never reproduced, would you exist? And if so, how could "you" be "you", when we know that much of who we are is determined by our genes. But if you're not "you", then who are "you"?
  7. by   Jessy_RN
    Quote from mercyteapot
    Well, to be technical, we actually evolved from arthropods, as did apes. The question is still relevant, though, because there are still many species of arthropods alive today. Their body layout has evolved into many forms and has been adapted for different functions. Those that haven't evolved had no need for those functions. The same goes for apes.

    Now for mine. It is something I've pondered since early childhood. If your parents had never reproduced, would you exist? And if so, how could "you" be "you", when we know that much of who we are is determined by our genes. But if you're not "you", then who are "you"?

    Ay, this is a toughy Mercy but an awesome question!

    I would have to say that no, you would not exist. Independent assortment and gene segregation take care of that.

    I mean there are so many unique and specific combinations that made you, so if your parents did not reproduce then you would be just someone else.

    You'd be the girl next door, or the lady across town.

    Unless all these factors that make "you" up at the moment actually went into effect and happened.............you would not be you. You'd be another human being or maybe you'd never been born.

    Even if your parents did reproduce, but not whith the specific combinations you'd still not be you. You'd be someone else. There are no 2 human beings exactly alike in every way so you'd be a sibling.

    Unless of course, you believe in reincarnation :-)


    You are unique and one and only. You belong to a species, group, family and have a name.

    Question:

    Since no one actually really knows, what is your take and why..........what came first the chicken or the egg....why?
    Last edit by Jessy_RN on Oct 21, '05
  8. by   talaxandra
    Mercy - The question of identity has invited debate from theologists, philosophers, psycologists and psychiatrists (among othes) for centuries, with opinions varying wildly.
    Who we are is determined by a combination of genetic and environmental factors, so any alteration in genetic composition (eg another sperm or ova, even with the same parents), gestational experience (eg maternal illness), or early childhood experience would have resulted in a different individual.
    Although we tend to think of our selves as being immutable, in reality who we are changes - think, for example, of how different you are at work, and with your parents or siblings. While some of this is because we express different aspects of ourselves in different scenarios, while still retaining our core selves, have you ever found yourself acting or feeling in a way that just isn't who you are?
    More significant personality change can occur as a result of disease or trauma - I have one friend who believes her personality to be so changed by SLE that she now uses a different name, to distinguish between her pre- and post-SLE selves. Another friend has had significant personality change following a car accident (with associated hypoxia) - she remembers all her pre-accident activities and behaviours, but as though it happened to someone else: then an atheist, now married to an evangelical minister; then promiscuous, now monogomous; then pot-smoking and port-drinking, now tea-total.

    Jess - the egg: many things can lay eggs, but chickens can't come from nowhere! What actually happened was that a reptilian bird-ancestor laid an egg or clutch of eggs that was slightly more birdlike, and so on.
    I reserve my right to come up with two stupid questions later
    Last edit by talaxandra on Oct 21, '05
  9. by   Jessy_RN
    Quote from talaxandra
    Mercy - The question of identity has invited debate from theologists, philosophers, psycologists and psychiatrists (among othes) for centuries, with opinions varying wildly.
    Who we are is determined by a combination of genetic and environmental factors, so any alteration in genetic composition (eg another sperm or ova, even with the same parents), gestational experience (eg maternal illness), or early childhood experience would have resulted in a different individual.
    Although we tend to think of our selves as being immutable, in reality who we are changes - think, for example, of how different you are at work, and with your parents or siblings. While some of this is because we express different aspects of ourselves in different scenarios, while still retaining our core selves, have you ever found yourself acting or feeling in a way that just isn't who you are?
    More significant personality change can occur as a result of disease or trauma - I have one friend who believes her personality to be so changed by SLE that she now uses a different name, to distinguish between her pre- and post-SLE selves. Another friend has had significant personality change following a car accident (with associated hypoxia) - she remembers all her pre-accident activities and behaviours, but as though it happened to someone else: then an atheist, now married to an evangelical minister; then promiscuous, now monogomous; then pot-smoking and port-drinking, now tea-total.

    Jess - the egg: many things can lay eggs, but chickens can't come from nowhere! What actually happened was that a reptilian bird-ancestor laid an egg or clutch of eggs that was slightly more birdlike, and so on.
    I reserve my right to come up with two stupid questions later
    Good one

    Anyone up for new q's?
  10. by   Spidey's mom
    Quote from mercyteapot
    Well, to be technical, we actually evolved from arthropods, as did apes. The question is still relevant, though, because there are still many species of arthropods alive today. Their body layout has evolved into many forms and has been adapted for different functions. Those that haven't evolved had no need for those functions. The same goes for apes.

    Now for mine. It is something I've pondered since early childhood. If your parents had never reproduced, would you exist? And if so, how could "you" be "you", when we know that much of who we are is determined by our genes. But if you're not "you", then who are "you"?
    Well, to be simple . . . . I don't see how, if your parents had never reproduced, there would be a "you" period. The unique egg and unique sperm that created me would never have come together if my parents had never had children so I would not exist, nor would my siblings.

    I'm "me' because of my parents reproducing, so it they don't reproduce, I don't exist.

    I'll have to think about my own "stupid" question for awhile.

    Good thread idea though.

    steph
  11. by   talaxandra
    I have one! Nobody, so far as I'm aware, likes coffee, olives, or blue cheeses, among others on first acquaintance. So how did foods that are 'an acquired taste' ever become regularly eaten?
    And here's another one, which I'm sure I could find out for myself if I could be bothered wading through google - what exactly is a 4.0 average? I know that it's good, but what does it translate to/how is it determined? And can you get higher than 4.0? And why 4?
    Last edit by talaxandra on Oct 21, '05
  12. by   HeartsOpenWide
    Quote from talaxandra
    I have one! Nobody, so far as I'm aware, likes coffee, olives, or blue cheeses, among others on first acquaintance. So how did foods that are 'an acquired taste' ever become regularly eaten?
    And here's another one, which I'm sure I could find out for myself if I could be bothered wading through google - what exactly is a 4.0 average? I know that it's good, but what does it translate to/how is it determined? And can you get higher than 4.0? And why 4?
    Grade point averages are figured by grades them selves...
    A.....4.0
    A-....3.7
    B+...3.3
    B.....3.0
    B-...2.7
    C+..2.3
    C...2.0
    D...1.0
    F...0

    A grade point average is computed each term by dividing the total grade points earned by the total units attempted.
    For example a student who earns a grade of A in six units, B in three units, C in three units, D in three units and F in 2.5 units the person would have a GPA of 2.40:

    6 units A x 4 =24 pts
    3 units B x 3 = 9 pts
    3 units C x 2 = 6 pts
    3 units D x 1 = 3 pts
    2.5 units F x 0 = 0 pts
    ______________________
    17.5 units....total units....42 pts

    The 42 pts is divided by 17.5 units which comes to 2.40

    People that have a GPA higher than a 4.0 have straight A's and do extra curricular activities
    My question: Why was daylight savings time created?
    Last edit by HeartsOpenWide on Oct 21, '05
  13. by   mercyteapot
    I'll answer the one about acquired tastes. I had actually typed out this long post answering both questions, and then accidentally clicked the side of my mouse, and the whole thing disappeared :angryfire

    Anyhoo... people go to the trouble of acquiring tastes for things which to them signal sophistication, IMHO. And by the very fact that not just anyone likes them, they become desirable. That would account for why people like blue cheese and olives. As for coffee, the way it smells whilst brewing and the promise of the caffeine jolt was enough for me to keep drinking it until I finally liked it!
  14. by   Fun2, RN, BSN
    for the above: please don't tell me i'd be my sister! omg!


    talaxandra: 4.0 is all a's.
    this is how you figure it:

    for an a, you get 4 points
    for a b, you get 3 points
    for a c, you get 2 points
    for a d, you get 1 point
    for an f, you get o points

    so,
    for a 4 credit class with an a:
    4 x 4 = 16

    for a 3 credit class with an a:
    3 x 4 = 12

    so, you add the subtotals:
    16 + 12 = 28

    divide by the number of credits
    28 / 7 = 4.0

    why 4? i don't know. i know that some high schools go by a 10 point system, but most, if not all colleges go by a 4 point system.


    oh, and i love olives....always have that i remember. lol


    i don't have a question right now.

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