Sudan: U.N. Clears Gov't of Genocide

  1. Sudan: U.N. Clears Gov't of Genocide

    By DANIEL BALINT-KURTI
    ABUJA, Nigeria (AP) - Sudan's foreign minister said Monday a U.N. report concluded that no genocide was committed in his country's Darfur region, where tens of thousands of civilians have died in a nearly two-year crisis.

    At U.N. headquarters in New York, diplomats confirmed that the report did not find that Sudan had committed genocide, but they said it was very critical of Sudanese government actions. The report was expected to be circulated in New York on Tuesday.

    The United States has accused Sudan's government of directing militia who attack civilians in what Washington has called a genocidal campaign in the western region.

    ``We have a copy of that report and they didn't say that there is a genocide,'' Sudan Foreign Minister Mustafa Osman Ismail said on the sidelines of an African Union summit in the Nigerian capital, Abuja.

    Last year, the United Nations said the Darfur conflict created the world's worst humanitarian crisis. U.N. Secretary-General Kofi Annan said Sunday a report on the situation would be forwarded to Security Council members ``very shortly.''

    Annan declined to say whether the team made a determination that genocide was committed.

    ``Regardless of how the commission describes what is going on in Darfur, there is no doubt that serious crimes have been committed,'' he said.

    U.S. diplomats at the United Nations said recently they would make proposals to the Security Council to bring the perpetrators of atrocities in Darfur to justice.

    Also Monday, Sudan's government and Darfur rebels said they will reopen long-stalled peace talks in Nigeria in February. Three previous peace conferences and a cease-fire agreement have failed to calm the violence.

    Both Osman and representatives of allied Sudanese rebel groups the Sudanese Liberation Army and the Justice and Equality Movement said they would attend the latest meetings, which a Western diplomat said on condition of anonymity were scheduled to begin the third week of February in Abuja.

    The most recent peace conference began Dec. 11 in Abuja, but rebels boycotted meetings with government delegates two days later, alleging a new government offensive. The talks broke down entirely within weeks.

    The Justice and Equality Movement, the smaller insurgent group, would attend the talks if AU negotiators treated them fairly and were ``serious and objective,'' Khalil Ibrahim Mohammed, a top rebel official, said Monday.

    He added that insurgent leaders wanted a new mediator for the talks.

    ``America and the European Union must come forward,'' he said by phone from Eritrea.

    The Darfur conflict began in February 2003 when the two rebel groups took up arms against what they considered years of state neglect and discrimination against Sudanese of African origin.

    The government responded with a counterinsurgency campaign in which an Arab militia, known as the Janjaweed, committed wide-scale abuses against the African population. An estimated 1.8 million people have been displaced in the conflict, and more than 70,000 people are believed to have died from hunger and disease since March.


    http://cnn.netscape.cnn.com/ns/news/...31.htm&sc=1105
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  2. 22 Comments

  3. by   Spidey's mom
    I guess it all depends on how you define "genocide".

    steph
  4. by   SmilingBluEyes
    simply amazing.
  5. by   URO-RN
    Wouldn't be surprised if $$$ was received for a "no genocide found"....a la Oil for Food scandal.
    Last edit by Jo Anne on Jan 31, '05
  6. by   jnette
    Unbelievable. :stone
  7. by   BeachNurse
    Quote from Jo Anne
    Wouldn't be surprised if $$$ was received for a "no genocide found"....a la Oil for Food scandal.
    I wouldn't be surprised either.
  8. by   Roy Fokker
    Why is everybody so surprised?

    Everybody's already forgotten Libya sitting on the Human Rights Commission board?
  9. by   URO-RN
    Quote from Roy Fokker
    Why is everybody so surprised?

    Everybody's already forgotten Libya sitting on the Human Rights Commission board?
    Oh yeah!. I don't know what they are thinking over there. Must be something in the water.:stone
  10. by   fergus51
    Well, if this isn't a case of the pot calling the kettle black! Has everyone forgotten Rwanda already? In case you have, that's where our government (along with many others) refused to call the slaughter of almost one million people genocide so that we could avoid helping them. We called it "acts of genocide". That way we could just watch it from the comfort of our living rooms.... I can't listen to us complain about the UN doing this without getting a little angry.
  11. by   SmilingBluEyes
    Quote from fergus51
    Well, if this isn't a case of the pot calling the kettle black! Has everyone forgotten Rwanda already? In case you have, that's where our government (along with many others) refused to call the slaughter of almost one million people genocide so that we could avoid helping them. We called it "acts of genocide". That way we could just watch it from the comfort of our living rooms.... I can't listen to us complain about the UN doing this without getting a little angry.
    OH MY GAWD, fergus, you took the words right out of my mouth. My, my, my......We have short memories, don't we? AH, but Rwanda was a LOOOOOOONG TIME AGO....at least 1993. But then maybe the word is CONVENIENT, regarding our memories. y'all slay me!
  12. by   Roy Fokker
    Quote from fergus51
    Well, if this isn't a case of the pot calling the kettle black! Has everyone forgotten Rwanda already? In case you have, that's where our government (along with many others) refused to call the slaughter of almost one million people genocide so that we could avoid helping them. We called it "acts of genocide". That way we could just watch it from the comfort of our living rooms.... I can't listen to us complain about the UN doing this without getting a little angry.
    I didn't know that!

    Wow! :stone
  13. by   fergus51
    Roy, if you are interested, they just released a movie about that genocide called "Hotel Rwanda". Don Cheadle has been nominated for an oscar for his role. Romeo Dallaire the Canadian general and peacekeeper who refused to leave Rwanda when he was ordered to also wrote a book about it called "Shake Hands with the Devil". It is absolutely haunting. http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/AS...894254-5479964
    For the first time in the United States comes the tragic and profoundly important story of the legendary Canadian general who "watched as the devil took control of paradise on earth and fed on the blood of the people we were supposed to protect." When Romo Dallaire was called on to serve as force commander of the UN Assistance Mission for Rwanda, he believed that his assignment was to help two warring parties achieve the peace they both wanted. Instead, he was exposed to the most barbarous and chaotic display of civil war and genocide in the past decade, observing in just one hundred days the killings of more than eight hundred thousand Rwandans. With only a few troops, his own ingenuity and courage to direct his efforts, Dallaire rescued thousands, but his call for more support from the world body fell on deaf ears. In Shake Hands with the Devil, General Dallaire recreates the awful history the world community chose to ignore. He also chronicles his own progression from confident Cold Warrior to devastated UN commander, and finally to retired general struggling painfully, and publicly, to overcome posttraumatic stress disorder-the highest-ranking officer ever to share such experiences with readers.
    Last edit by fergus51 on Jan 31, '05
  14. by   Rep
    I don't agree with this article. Genocide was committed with the knowledge and backing of Sudan government.

    Quote from BeachNurse
    Sudan: U.N. Clears Gov't of Genocide

    By DANIEL BALINT-KURTI
    ABUJA, Nigeria (AP) - Sudan's foreign minister said Monday a U.N. report concluded that no genocide was committed in his country's Darfur region, where tens of thousands of civilians have died in a nearly two-year crisis.

    At U.N. headquarters in New York, diplomats confirmed that the report did not find that Sudan had committed genocide, but they said it was very critical of Sudanese government actions. The report was expected to be circulated in New York on Tuesday.

    The United States has accused Sudan's government of directing militia who attack civilians in what Washington has called a genocidal campaign in the western region.

    ``We have a copy of that report and they didn't say that there is a genocide,'' Sudan Foreign Minister Mustafa Osman Ismail said on the sidelines of an African Union summit in the Nigerian capital, Abuja.

    Last year, the United Nations said the Darfur conflict created the world's worst humanitarian crisis. U.N. Secretary-General Kofi Annan said Sunday a report on the situation would be forwarded to Security Council members ``very shortly.''

    Annan declined to say whether the team made a determination that genocide was committed.

    ``Regardless of how the commission describes what is going on in Darfur, there is no doubt that serious crimes have been committed,'' he said.

    U.S. diplomats at the United Nations said recently they would make proposals to the Security Council to bring the perpetrators of atrocities in Darfur to justice.

    Also Monday, Sudan's government and Darfur rebels said they will reopen long-stalled peace talks in Nigeria in February. Three previous peace conferences and a cease-fire agreement have failed to calm the violence.

    Both Osman and representatives of allied Sudanese rebel groups the Sudanese Liberation Army and the Justice and Equality Movement said they would attend the latest meetings, which a Western diplomat said on condition of anonymity were scheduled to begin the third week of February in Abuja.

    The most recent peace conference began Dec. 11 in Abuja, but rebels boycotted meetings with government delegates two days later, alleging a new government offensive. The talks broke down entirely within weeks.

    The Justice and Equality Movement, the smaller insurgent group, would attend the talks if AU negotiators treated them fairly and were ``serious and objective,'' Khalil Ibrahim Mohammed, a top rebel official, said Monday.

    He added that insurgent leaders wanted a new mediator for the talks.

    ``America and the European Union must come forward,'' he said by phone from Eritrea.

    The Darfur conflict began in February 2003 when the two rebel groups took up arms against what they considered years of state neglect and discrimination against Sudanese of African origin.

    The government responded with a counterinsurgency campaign in which an Arab militia, known as the Janjaweed, committed wide-scale abuses against the African population. An estimated 1.8 million people have been displaced in the conflict, and more than 70,000 people are believed to have died from hunger and disease since March.


    http://cnn.netscape.cnn.com/ns/news/...31.htm&sc=1105

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