Stopping Smoking & Stopping Eating??Any Common Therapies? parallels ?

  1. I was just reading the stopping smoking and stopping eating threads. I wonder if what works for one would work for the other? Some people say overeating is an addiction. Any thoughts?
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  2. 10 Comments

  3. by   baseline
    I'm sure there are common therapies. But having stopped smoking and being continually in a battle with my weight, the only thing I can say is.....I could STOP smoking. I can't STOP eating. The smoking cessation was complete. The food thing is a mind game. No cold turkey there!
  4. by   Rustyhammer
    I am doing both at once.
    This is my very first diet and I need to lose 20 pounds (at least).
    I did some web research and came up with a plan.
    Basically it is consume less and exert more.
    I decided to do this at the same time as stopping smoking as one would help the other.
    So far so good.
    -Russell
  5. by   emily_mom
    For 69.95, you can get hypnotized to stop smoking and lose weight. Just listen to all the feedback...I'm SURE it works
  6. by   passing thru
    Russ, I think you must be over the worst. One thing I learned when I quit smoking, which I did several times, is: The first 2 weeks was the worst. The next 2 weeks was a wee bit easier. I had quit for about a year when something stressful came up and I decided to buy a pack of cigarettes and smoke a few and toss them.
    What no one had ever told me and I was shocked to learn:
    With that first cigarette, I was "hooked" again. Even though I only smoked a couple of packs and quit again ! it was just as hard to quit again. I went through the same 2 weeks of awful withdrawals and the next 2 weeks nearly as bad.
    I know this doesn't make sense, but it is how it happened to me.
    I was in shock to see how difficult it was to quit the 2nd time after a year and after only a couple packs.
    I figured it was similar to an alcoholics addiction and being on the wagon, and falling off. It is very hard for them to get back on the wagon, so I am told.
    No one ever told me that about smoking.
  7. by   BadBird
    I decided that a big butt is the new fashion trend so I just don't stress about it anymore. I do eat healthy 90 percent of the time but if something greasy is calling out to me then I don't feel guilty about it. I never smoked so I don't have any words of wisedom for you there.
  8. by   CountrifiedRN
    Originally posted by passing thru
    Russ, I think you must be over the worst. One thing I learned when I quit smoking, which I did several times, is: The first 2 weeks was the worst. The next 2 weeks was a wee bit easier. I had quit for about a year when something stressful came up and I decided to buy a pack of cigarettes and smoke a few and toss them.
    What no one had ever told me and I was shocked to learn:
    With that first cigarette, I was "hooked" again. Even though I only smoked a couple of packs and quit again ! it was just as hard to quit again. I went through the same 2 weeks of awful withdrawals and the next 2 weeks nearly as bad.
    I know this doesn't make sense, but it is how it happened to me.
    I was in shock to see how difficult it was to quit the 2nd time after a year and after only a couple packs.
    I figured it was similar to an alcoholics addiction and being on the wagon, and falling off. It is very hard for them to get back on the wagon, so I am told.
    No one ever told me that about smoking.
    I am currently a smoker, but have quit for almost a year in the past. It took a lot longer, a few months, for it to get easier for me. I know it was not the physical addiction after the first week or so, it was the psychological part.

    I had the same experience where something stressful came up, and I used it as an excuse to have "just one" cigarette. One led to another, and another, and then it was as if I hadn't quit at all. I thought one cig would be ok. I have known people who quit, and can have an occasional cigarette without resuming their old habits. Everyone is different, I guess.

    Now, I want to quit again, but I am afraid of that terrible "jump out of your skin if you don't have a cigarette" feeling. I have a pack and a half left, and I am not going to buy any more. When these are gone, I will quit. I have a friend who quit yesterday, and with lots of people on this board quitting recently, hopefullly I will have a good support system.

    Wish me luck!
  9. by   dingofred
    Moving more is what helped me get rid of the cigs.
    The more I moved, the more I could tell I was
    breathing better. It was a great incentive!!
    The bonus was the weight loss........
  10. by   passing thru
    RN2bNC: I hear people say they are going to quit when they finish their present pack. I don't think that is the best mindset for quitting. The "pack" is "making the decision."
    The people I know who have had the most success say "I QUIT !!" and snatch up every pack, carton, every cigarette in the house and immerse them in sudsy dishwater. Then they remove all visual cues, then inform all family members there will be no smoking on the premises, inside or out. Then empty car ashtrays, put in a car fragrance thingy, and the hundred other things that must be done. And , yes, the getting up and going for a walk is what did it for me. The urge to smoke will pass, the longest it lasted for me was 20 minutes and I kept walking. It's kinda like a labor pain, the urge for a cigarette starts, increases -increases-increases - reaches a peak- and starts declining........ You'd better be outside and walking or you will be on your way to the store to buy a pack. the urges slowly begin to come with less frequency.
    rn2 B: Take control ! Toss them now! Not even "one last cigarette" (""I'll have o n e last smoke "") That is letting the cigarette make a lasting and final 'positive memory''. Your "positive memory" should be you snatching the pack and "drowning" it, .......not inhaling.
    If your last memory of smoking is that last cigarette and how much you "enjoyed" it, ; you WILL go back to smoking.
  11. by   prmenrs
    I have no words of wisdom re: smoking, except that I wish you ALL success. It is a tough one.

    FOOD: I am a perect size ten, I just keep it covered up w/fat so it won't get scratched. (from a magnet on my fridge).

    I joined WeightWatchers online, and I really like it, there's lots of structure, I have to go and "journal" all my food, exercise, water, etc. If anyone else is doing WW, let me know, we can support each other.
  12. by   CountrifiedRN
    Originally posted by passing thru
    RN2bNC: I hear people say they are going to quit when they finish their present pack. I don't think that is the best mindset for quitting. The "pack" is "making the decision."

    rn2 B: Take control ! Toss them now! Not even "one last cigarette" (""I'll have o n e last smoke "") That is letting the cigarette make a lasting and final 'positive memory''. Your "positive memory" should be you snatching the pack and "drowning" it, .......not inhaling.
    If your last memory of smoking is that last cigarette and how much you "enjoyed" it, ; you WILL go back to smoking.
    Passing thru, I know you are absolutely right. I think part of me really wants to quit, and part of me doesn't. It's so darn hard! These past couple days I've been trying to psych myself out to quit, and I have only succeeded in making the task that much more unbearable. I feel like "this is my last chance to enjoy it, so I better make it good!" I've already started to miss it and I haven't quit yet.

    But I do know that I have to start with a fresh day, I can't do it half way through a day. So, tonight, I will drown the cigarettes I have left, and throw away all my ashtrays. (The trash man comes tomorrow, so I know I can't rummage through and get them back, hehe)

    Thank you for the advice.

    prmenrs, I have also done the WW online, and I really liked it. I've been saying for a while now that I should go back to it. Especially because I am still paying for it.:imbar PM me if you'd like.

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