Spanish opposition claims victory

  1. Payback time. It seems that the Spanish are a little upset that their government tried to adamantly blame the ETA, even after evidence was uncovered that showed they probably weren't responsible. And I guess they are even more upset because of their Prime Minister pulling them into Iraq, against the overwhelming wishes of the nation.

    I wonder if the new government will withdraw Spanish soldiers from Iraq. Should be interesting.



    Spanish opposition claims victory

    Spain's opposition Socialist party has claimed an unexpected victory in the country's general election with almost all the votes counted.

    The Socialists have won 43% of the vote while the centre-right Popular Party has garnered 38%, reports say.

    The poll has been clouded by claims that al-Qaeda carried out the Madrid bomb attacks that killed 200 people.

    Officials said turnout was 62.9% just before voting ended - higher than the 55.5% at the same time in 2000's poll.

    Analysts said people had turned out in bigger numbers than predicted in order to defy the bombers who carried out last Thursday's attacks in Madrid.

    Investigation

    Investigations continue into who was behind the bombings.

    Initially, the government was adamant the Basque separatist organisation Eta was responsible for the bombings, but now it has been forced to admit that al-Qaeda has become the top suspect, the BBC's Richard Galpin in Madrid says.

    This comes after a videotaped claim of responsibility by a man identifying himself as al-Qaeda's military spokesman in Europe.

    Voters defiant after the horror of Thursday's bomb attacks

    In pictures

    But Spanish Foreign Minister Ana Palacio told the BBC Eta was still a strong suspect, and said police were not ruling out a possible collaboration between Eta and al-Qaeda.

    Three Moroccans and two Indians are being held in connection with the attacks.

    Germany has called an urgent meeting of EU interior ministers to discuss the situation.

    Black ribbons hung from polling booths and voters' lapels on Sunday.

    Cayetano Abad, one of the 1,500 wounded in last Thursday's attacks, was driven to a polling station in an ambulance.

    "I've come to show that everything carries on, that we cannot stand idle," he said, bandaged and wearing a neck brace.

    Duty to vote

    Many people admitted they had not planned to vote until the bombings.

    "I have two friends who have never voted in their lives and they're going to vote in this one," said 41-year-old businessman Carlos Bermudez.

    Outgoing Prime Minister Jose Maria Aznar and his wife were booed and jostled as they arrived to cast their votes.


    I wanted to feel a little bit better, because at home I can't do anything
    Madrid protester

    Bombs' impact on elections
    Al-Qaeda claim: Full text
    As he tried to address supporters, he was drowned out by cries of "manipulators", "liars" and "peace".

    Mariano Rajoy - who is to succeed Mr Aznar if their Popular Party (PP) is returned to office - was also forced to find cover after youths hurled abuse as he voted.

    The videotape was found in a litter bin on Saturday following an anonymous tip-off to a Madrid television station.

    In the video, a man speaking Arabic with a Moroccan accent says the attacks were revenge for Spain's "collaboration with the criminals Bush and his allies".

    The Spanish government backed the US-led invasion of Iraq last year despite polls showing 90% opposition to it from the Spanish public.

    http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/europe/3511280.stm
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  2. 11 Comments

  3. by   jnette
    I'm not surprised.

    While I wish we never went about ridding Iraq of SH the way we did, I'm glad nonetheless that is is out of power.

    But I do believe that the priority should have beenTERRORISM itself.

    But.... what do I know? I fear there will be many more yet to come if something is not done soon.
  4. by   Havin' A Party!
    This goes back to the other thread relating to this issue.

    Seems pretty clear now: Most Spaniards don't support our efforts in Iraq.
  5. by   wjf00
    Seems like the "Coalition of the Willing" is unraveling before our eyes. The Spanish wont be fooled by Dubbya's lies. World opinion of the US is at an all time low.... gee thanks Dubbya.
  6. by   roxannekkb
    Quote from LarryG
    This goes back to the other thread relating to this issue.

    Seems pretty clear now: Most Spaniards don't support our efforts in Iraq.
    It was never unclear. Over 90% of the Spanish people vehemently opposed the war in Iraq. Millions demonstrated in Madrid and all over the nation. They made thier opposition very clear.

    The government acted against the wishes of its population, and the people now have spoken. The new prime minister has promised to bring home the 1300 Spanish troops from Iraq, when their tour of duty ends in July.

    Governments are supposed to represent the people they govern, not themselves. In a democracy, anyway, as Spain is.
  7. by   elkpark
    As Jon Stewart put it, on "The Daily Show" way back when, "What President Bush calls 'the coalition of the willing,' or, as the rest of the world refers to it, 'Britain and Spain' ..." Guess it's not even that anymore -- just Britain. :chuckle
  8. by   Alnamvet
    Quote from LarryG
    This goes back to the other thread relating to this issue.

    Seems pretty clear now: Most Spaniards don't support our efforts in Iraq.
    Wrong answer kiddo...most Spaniards DO support US/EU efforts against TERRORISM....as for Iraq, MOST intelligent folk don't see the connection between terrorism and Saddam. So try to keep the facts straight. :stone
  9. by   Havin' A Party!
    Yo, Al, kiddo -- My post stated "Most Spaniards don't support our efforts in Iraq."

    So please try to keep my comments straight.

    Hasta manana.
  10. by   pickledpepperRN
    A local man I didn't even know was from Madrid said, "I am an American now. Spain is my place of birth. They suffered a total lack of freedom under Franco so now send the message that no leader who defies the will of the people will be elected. The phrase about regime change beginning at home is now true."
  11. by   molecule
    >>
    "Here is a country that stood against terrorism, and had a huge terrorist act within their country, and they chose to change their government and to in a sense appease terrorists," House Speaker Dennis Hastert said.<<
    http://www.cnn.com/2004/ALLPOLITICS/...eut/index.html

    so any who don't pick Bush in our election are appeasers too?
    that's going to be the story line:"vote Republican or be for terror"
  12. by   pickledpepperRN
    I heard the voices of some who said they voted out the liar who did not serve the people.
  13. by   roxannekkb
    Quote from molecule
    >>
    "Here is a country that stood against terrorism, and had a huge terrorist act within their country, and they chose to change their government and to in a sense appease terrorists," House Speaker Dennis Hastert said.<<
    http://www.cnn.com/2004/ALLPOLITICS/...eut/index.html

    so any who don't pick Bush in our election are appeasers too?
    that's going to be the story line:"vote Republican or be for terror"
    Either your with us or against us. That's the Bush motto. Sort of like if you were opposed to the Iraq war, you automatically loved and supported Saddam Hussein.

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