Soldiers who lost limbs in Iraq and Afghan. are doing the unthinkable: Going Back

  1. to the front
    soldiers who lost limbs in iraq and afghanistan are doing the unthinkable: going back into battle

    [font=verdana, arial, helvetica, sans-serif]by pat wingert and t. trent gegax
    [font=verdana, arial, helvetica, sans-serif]newsweek

    [font=verdana, arial, helvetica, sans-serif]march 14 issue - army s/sgt. daniel metzdorf figured his career as an infantryman was over when he lost his right leg to a roadside bomb in iraq in january 2004. but back at walter reed army medical hospital, metzdorf saw other amputees ambling by on high-tech prosthetic legs and had a crazy idea: he wanted to go back into battle with the 82nd airborne. it was a long and painful struggle. the 28-year-old had 19 operations and faced hours of grueling rehab, first learning to walk again, and then to run and swim. confident that he was ready, metzdorf applied for reinstatement. but instead of a new post, the army had another offer: a medical discharge. to a fighter like metzdorf, quitting didn't seem like an option. "i told them, 'i'm not going to get out'," he says. he applied--and was rejected--twice more before he won over one important ally, his unit commander, who weighed in on his behalf. finally, the army relented, assigning metzdorf to a desk job at fort bragg, n.c. he's still angling to get back to combat duty in iraq. "i'm still an asset," metzdorf says. "i just want to give back as much as i got."


    [font=verdana, arial, helvetica, sans-serif]url: http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/7101643/site/newsweek/
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  2. 18 Comments

  3. by   Mkue
    An amazing and inspirational story, thanks for posting it Jo Anne.
  4. by   leslie :-D
    i have mixed feelings about this story.

    kudos to Metzdorf for his ambitious determination and devotion.

    what i am ambivalent about is Bush stating that they're encouraged to stay, if able. i mean, they've lost a limb for crying out loud. haven't they sacrificed enough? yet Bush encourages them to stay....what the hell, they still have some limbs left. who cares what they've lost already? to me, the moral thing to do is ship them home and give them medal and whatever else they need/want. :stone
  5. by   SharonH, RN
    Quote from jo anne
    to the front
    soldiers who lost limbs in iraq and afghanistan are doing the unthinkable: going back into battle

    [font=verdana, arial, helvetica, sans-serif]by pat wingert and t. trent gegax
    [font=verdana, arial, helvetica, sans-serif]newsweek

    [font=verdana, arial, helvetica, sans-serif]march 14 issue - army s/sgt. daniel metzdorf figured his career as an infantryman was over when he lost his right leg to a roadside bomb in iraq in january 2004. but back at walter reed army medical hospital, metzdorf saw other amputees ambling by on high-tech prosthetic legs and had a crazy idea: he wanted to go back into battle with the 82nd airborne. it was a long and painful struggle. the 28-year-old had 19 operations and faced hours of grueling rehab, first learning to walk again, and then to run and swim. confident that he was ready, metzdorf applied for reinstatement. but instead of a new post, the army had another offer: a medical discharge. to a fighter like metzdorf, quitting didn't seem like an option. "i told them, 'i'm not going to get out'," he says. he applied--and was rejected--twice more before he won over one important ally, his unit commander, who weighed in on his behalf. finally, the army relented, assigning metzdorf to a desk job at fort bragg, n.c. he's still angling to get back to combat duty in iraq. "i'm still an asset," metzdorf says. "i just want to give back as much as i got."


    [font=verdana, arial, helvetica, sans-serif]url: http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/7101643/site/newsweek/

    there is something seriously wrong with someone who wants to go to war especially after they have lost limbs. i am sure there are those who will claim they are "heroic" and "inspirational" but they need serious counseling.
  6. by   leslie :-D
    Quote from SharonH, RN
    There is something seriously wrong with someone who wants to go to war especially after they have lost limbs. I am sure there are those who will claim they are "heroic" and "inspirational" but they need serious counseling.
    I too, was incredulous that he wanted to return to war. i just think the whole story is bizarre.
  7. by   BeachNurse
    This soldier is not the only one! I have seen a couple documentaries and soldiers interviewed in the hospital who stated they wanted to go back and "finish the job". So you are saying that they are insane for wanting to go back?! Maybe they are devoted to their job or to the mission, has that ever crossed your minds?
  8. by   SmilingBluEyes
    I have mixed feelings on this, They MAY be setting a precendent here I don't want to see become common. The President speaks of Iran, Syria, N. Korea. Where will draw resources from to fight more wars? Hmmmm a lot to think about.

    But at this point, these brave souls are doing this voluntarily, so they must believe in the cause they fight for. God bless them. What can I say, but best wishes to each of these people willing to sacrifice so much. I wish them safety and peace.
  9. by   BeachNurse
    Quote from SmilingBluEyes
    But at this point, these brave souls are doing this voluntarily, so they must believe in the cause they fight for. God bless them. What can I say, but best wishes to each of these people willing to sacrifice so much. I wish them safety and peace.
    Well said.
  10. by   fergus51
    I'm sure they want to serve and I wonder if part of it is wanting to be useful as well. They might not have so many options back in the US.
  11. by   SharonH, RN
    Quote from BeachNurse
    This soldier is not the only one! I have seen a couple documentaries and soldiers interviewed in the hospital who stated they wanted to go back and "finish the job". So you are saying that they are insane for wanting to go back?! Maybe they are devoted to their job or to the mission, has that ever crossed your minds?

    Insane? No. But I do wonder if they have some hyperinflated sense of duty or responsibility that is unhealthy. They have already lost a limb, they've seen the horrors of war firsthand and they want to go back for more? In the fervor to support the troops, the members of the military have almost been deified. I bet it's hard to give up that feeling of heroism.


    And what about their families? Isn't that unfair to them? I know that parents and spouses know the risks their loved ones face when they join the military, but there's a bit of a difference here. And what about their children, don't they owe it to them to do everything to stay home and be safe instead of running back into danger? I remember back at the beginning of the war, there was a case of a guy whose infant son was going to have open heart surgery. He had the option of staying with his sick son and wife but he chose to go join his unit, stating that his country needed him. Of course he was being lauded as a hero but I think he was being quite selfish. Now let's think about that for a minute. His infant son was having open heart surgery and his wife surely needed not only his support but the peace of mind of knowing that he was alright while she dealt with her son's illness but he had to go save the world? That's not right.
  12. by   Spidey's mom
    Actually I've read about one young man and seen him interviewed quite a bit lately . . . I'll post the link to his book, Back In Action, by Captain David Rozelle.

    http://a1204.g.akamai.net/7/1204/140...00/9081773.jpg


    And here is the description and some reviews.

    http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/AS...676770-3012122


    steph
  13. by   Fluesy
    [font=Comic Sans MS]There was the celebrated Douglas Bader in World War II who was a bilateral amputee but rejoined the airforce to become one of the best known fighter pilots of the war.

    Do the two things equal each other? No. England was fighting directly for her freedom and it was a case of every person that could help did. Nevertheless it is and was accepted, even by Bader himself that a lot of propaganda was built around him.

    Iraq was a chosen war. America does not need to be there it is not an imperative. It is well documented that Iraq was not a threat to the US or the rest of the world.

    In the meantime there have been countless "truth about Iraq" emails circulated - all well written all supporting what is happening and all with a curious sameness as if they have sprung from the one well.

    This too could be a case of simple propaganda. :stone

    On the other hand it might be someone wanting to "get back to the fighting" but what fighting? Isn't the war supposed to be over? The attitude required for peacekeepers is very different from that required for soldiers on and in a battlefield. Peacekeepers should be there to NOT be in a battle.
  14. by   Mkue
    I've read a few stories of soldiers injured and then wanting to go back to Iraq, some feel a "bond" or "brotherhood" to their fellow soldiers. I find this quite admiral. Being in the nursing profession sometimes we don't see bonding, and desire to go back to a job that is stressful.

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