slamming a youth onto a car trunk and hitting him.

  1. Did you see the video?
    My opinion is first the church and community groups' prepared so not one act of violence occurred. GOOD!
    If there had been a riot the community would have been given $$$ like what happened in Michigan recently. How about rewarding people for working to prevent violence?
    Seven jurors voted the officer was guilty of excessive force. GOOD!
    The only person who went to jail was the man who filmed the assault. NOT GOOD!
    As a nurse I know "not charted = not done". Seems it is OK not to document throwing a limp teen who has committed no crime onto a car and punching him in the face.
    As a nurse I know that four small women could restrain a man that size on PCP who is fighting and biting. There were MANY police standing around and the kid was handcuffed. The officer was only 25 years old.

    There are prayer vigils planned from 7:00 to 8:00 pm for forty nights in front of the City Hall. Seems like an appropriate response to me. Timing is difficult for the staff of the 2 nearby hospitals to attend because they are on 12 hour shifts 7- 7:30 AM & PM.

    http://www.latimes.com/la-me-inglewo...,3299519.story
    Mistrial Declared in Inglewood Police Case
    An ex-officer was charged with assault for slamming a youth onto a car trunk and hitting him. Partner is cleared of writing a false report.
    By Richard Marosi and Nancy Wride
    Times Staff Writers

    July 30, 2003

    Jurors in the Donovan Jackson police-abuse trial declared Tuesday that they could not reach a verdict on the assault charge against Jeremy Morse, the former Inglewood police officer caught on videotape last summer slamming Jackson, then 16, onto the trunk of a police car and punching him in the face.
    In a case that drew national attention, Los Angeles Superior Court Judge William R. Hollingsworth Jr. announced a hung jury on the charge against Morse, 25, after the foreman of the jury said further deliberations would not change members' minds. The jury deadlocked with seven voting Morse guilty and five voting not guilty, a split the foreman said had changed little over three days of deliberations.

    The same jury found Morse's former partner, Bijan Darvish, 26, not guilty of filing a false police report about the confrontation. The two men faced up to three years in prison if convicted on the felony charges.

    Jackson, 17, sat quietly during the proceedings. "We tried. We tried. We tried," community activist Mollie Bell said as she hugged Jackson's mother, Felicia Chavis.
    The jury's failure to agree on the guilt or innocence of Morse left the closely watched case unsettled. The seven-day trial, which had racial overtones because Morse is white and Jackson is black, was monitored by civil rights activists, community members and federal officials.

    With worries that an unpopular verdict could lead to violence, as was seen after the acquittal of police officers in the 1992 Rodney G. King beating trial, community organizers had worked for months to encourage peaceful demonstrations, regardless of the outcome. Ministers in local churches on Sunday delivered sermons urging calm.

    On Tuesday, there were plenty of opinions but no trouble after the jury's decision was announced.

    At the Soul Food Kitchen at Manchester Boulevard and La Brea Avenue, owner Adolf Dulan applauded the work of civic and religious leaders.

    "Most of my customers here, their attitude is: 'Let's keep a cool head. Let's not have a repeat of the Rodney King blowout,' " he said. "I've seen a few hotheads, but people who have a vested interest in the community want to keep it safe."

    During the trial, Deputy Dist. Attys. Max Huntsman and Michael Pettersen based their case against the officers on three seconds of video that shows Morse slamming Jackson on the trunk of a police cruiser. Prosecutors said Jackson appeared lifeless, dangling like a rag doll, which made Morse's response an excessive use of force.

    Defense attorneys argued that the slam culminated a fierce and long struggle, during which Jackson grabbed, kicked and punched at the officers. Morse, having suffered neck and ear injuries, manhandled Jackson because the teenager was passively resisting by going limp, attorneys said. The teenager, they argued, later grabbed Morse's testicles, prompting the punch and proving Morse had not used enough force. Jackson suffered minor injuries.
    Jackson's family, who has said an auditory disorder impedes Jackson's ability to communicate and may have slowed his response to police commands, said Tuesday that they were not surprised by the trial's outcome. "No, uh-uh," said Nancy Goins of Los Angeles, Donovan's aunt, with a deep sigh. "Not surprised."
    "It's not fair. I think he's guilty," Rodriguez said after the decision. "I was surprised. I feel a little bad..... He was handcuffed and didn't deserve to be beaten. I have respect for the police, but the police should have respect for the people."
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  2. 9 Comments

  3. by   pickledpepperRN
    http://www.latimes.com/news/local/la...,7844747.story
    http://www.latimes.com/news/local/la...,3365406.story
    http://www.latimes.com/news/local/la...,2185754.story

    I think the prosecution did a terrible job. They did not present testimony from witnesses including the man who filmed the violence. Their witness was an officer who said he did not think there was a crime. This was a PROSECUTION witness.
    To me they are afraid the police won't testify for them in the future.

    Videotape with poor quality is used routinely to convict robbers and others. This was excellent quality. Clearly the kid was unable to attack or do anything. Unlike Rodney King Donovan Jackson had done NOTHING! His Dad had not put the renewal sticker on the license plate. That is why he was slammed against the car and punched in the face.
  4. by   maureeno
    "Some misconduct occurs not because the officers didn't know they were doing something wrong but, instead, because they knew -- based on their own experience -- that they would almost certainly "get away with it." This attitude will not change until these officers learn to expect the opposite. Perhaps the most famous police whistle blower Frank Serpico recently said that we need to create an atmosphere where the bad officers have more to fear than the good officers rather than the other way around. That atmosphere will not be created until we place a high priority on police accountability."
    Testimony of Laura Murphy, Director, Washington National Office of the American Civil Liberties Union
    Congressional Black Caucus
    Hearing on Police Abuse
    May 10, 1999
  5. by   Brownms46
    Originally posted by maureeno
    "Some misconduct occurs not because the officers didn't know they were doing something wrong but, instead, because they knew -- based on their own experience -- that they would almost certainly "get away with it." This attitude will not change until these officers learn to expect the opposite. Perhaps the most famous police whistle blower Frank Serpico recently said that we need to create an atmosphere where the bad officers have more to fear than the good officers rather than the other way around. That atmosphere will not be created until we place a high priority on police accountability."
    Testimony of Laura Murphy, Director, Washington National Office of the American Civil Liberties Union
    Congressional Black Caucus
    Hearing on Police Abuse
    May 10, 1999
    Amen
  6. by   pickledpepperRN
    This will be tried again.
    At least 7 of the 12 did not go for the defense claim that they did not see what they saw.
  7. by   SharonH, RN
    Well according to that Tom,



    Sowell it is Black people's own faults that these things keep happening. According to him, if we weren't such criminals these things wouldn't happen. The man's brilliant!
  8. by   maureeno
    every day throughout my sister's pregnancies
    I prayed her babies be born healthy
    and female.
    17 years later I still feel horrid and conflicted and ashamed for this
    yet glad my prayers were answered.


    I am hoping for and working towards an America
    in which I can pray for grand-nephews!
    police accountabilty is essential
  9. by   fergus51
    I thought Sowell's argument was that Blacks are not targetted more than whites when looking at the crime statistics and not them as a percentage of the population?

    There were very few Blacks where I used to live, but there were charges of police using excessive force with white and native suspects, including one incident in Vancouver where cops are accused of having beaten a druggie and then dropping him off in a park. It is a bigger issue where I live now because we have a larger Black population, and it certainly causes a lot of hard feelings all sides.
  10. by   SharonH, RN
    Originally posted by fergus51
    I thought Sowell's argument was that Blacks are not targetted more than whites when looking at the crime statistics and not them as a percentage of the population?


    I couldn't tell what his point was in his long, stupid rambling commentary(like all of his columns). It was lost in statements like:

    "After all with so little resistance to the police, why were so many cops necessary?" This implied to me that he thought that police force must be justified or the cops wouldn't react that way.


    And "They [racial profiling statistics] are based on blacks as a percentage of the population rather than blacks as a percentage of the people who do the kinds fo things that cause police to stop people and question them"


    Again, inferring that racial profiling is justified because after all blacks are the ones who are doing the things in large numbers that cause them to be stopped as opposed to other racial groups who apparently do not. What a jerk he is.

    I remember when my brother, who was traveling with his wife and daugher made the mistake of making a right turn without signalling, this necessitated 3 Dekalb Co. police cars pulling him over and the car being searched instead of a simple ticket. My brother is the most boring, run-of-the mill guy you would want to meet and he is certainly no criminal. I guess that would qualify as alright by Tom's standards since he deserved that treatment for not signalling.
  11. by   maureeno
    >>>_
    Racial profiling is not unique to the police--every institution in this country profiles by race, whether it is banking, housing, or education. However, the police have the power to harass, brutalize, incarcerate, or kill, which puts their form of profiling on a higher level. From New Jersey Turnpike to the streets of Los Angeles CA, the issue of profiling by the Police has received enormous attention from the media, the public, politicians and Police Departments. According to a December 1999 Gallup poll, 59% of all Americans agree that racial profiling is a widespread problem and 75% of Black men state they've been stopped by the Police because of their Race. Here in Seattle a report stated that while Blacks make up roughly 10% of the population they received 19% of all traffic tickets or were twice as likely to be stopped by the Police, compared to whites.

    >>>While Civil Rights laws have made some progress in stemming overt racism, there has been no sincere effort to change the institutionalized and internalized racism buried in the hearts and minds of American whites. Malcolm X said "We need education, not just legislation." His words ring true. White people are raised in a culture that teaches them, through every institution (media, education, etc.) that people of color, specifically black men are lazy, violent, and to be feared. Thus, it should be of no surprise that racist actions and attitudes are manifested in white police officers through racial profiling or other acts of police misconduct. <<<by Dustin Washington
    http://www.afsc.org/pwork/1200/122k15a.htm

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