San Francisco considers injection room

  1. SAN FRANCISCO - City health officials took steps Thursday toward opening the nation's first legal safe-injection room, where addicts could shoot up heroin, cocaine and other drugs under the supervision of nurses.
    http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20071019/...sed_injections
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  2. 20 Comments

  3. by   oramar
    The problem I have with this is that this is a local law that conflicts with federal law. Won't the nurses put themselves at risk of being prosecuted by federal authorities working at a place like this?
  4. by   happydays352
    It's just like Oregon's laws about medical marijuana. Our state laws are in DIRECT conflict with federal laws.

    That issue is now in the courts, we'll just have to wait and see how that plays out.

    Personally I wouldn't want to work in a place like that for more then just the legal ramifications. More power to San Fran though stick it to the man .
    Last edit by happydays352 on Oct 19, '07 : Reason: than vs then I never know which
  5. by   oramar
    I just thought of something else. What about your malpractice insurance? If one of those addicts dies in that room, suddenly relatives they didn't know they had will come out of the woodwork looking to sue. My guess is that your insurance will say you were engaged in an illegal activity and refuse to pay. I have to admit I don't really know all the pitfalls but there are a lot of things about this situation that give me pause.
  6. by   RN1121
  7. by   nomdeplume
    This is exactly what I went to nursing school for! My experience on the liver transplant floor would only further qualify me for this kind of job..
    Last edit by nomdeplume on Oct 19, '07
  8. by   Soup Turtle
    Whoa! I consider myself to be pretty open-minded, but that's going waaaaay too far.
  9. by   leslie :-D
    supervising addicts sounds a heck of a lot safer than them being unsupervised.
    i would need to have all my concerns addressed, however, so i'm absolved of any liability.

    leslie
  10. by   Laught3r
    This may sound morbid, but I have read alot of nurses on this site complaining about addicts taking up more time in the hospital setting than those who are ill and not caused by something they did. It just seem ironic that now they want nurses to staff this place and assist them with techniques to better get high and cause their bodies to fail. Have any of these political people asked doctors to staff this place or paramedics. Why nurses! why do we have to save someone who probably don't want to save themselves?
  11. by   leslymill
    Quote from RN1121
    CODE BLUE
    CODE BLUE
  12. by   Jabramac
    I can't imagine any nurse actually being willing to work at a place like this. It makes you wonder if they even checked to see if they would be able to hire a nurse, or if they just assume nurses will do it. It would be like asking nurses to be bartenders to help ensure safe intoxication.
  13. by   SweetOldWorld
    Quote from nursepanther
    This may sound morbid, but I have read alot of nurses on this site complaining about addicts taking up more time in the hospital setting than those who are ill and not caused by something they did. It just seem ironic that now they want nurses to staff this place and assist them with techniques to better get high and cause their bodies to fail. Have any of these political people asked doctors to staff this place or paramedics. Why nurses! why do we have to save someone who probably don't want to save themselves?
    One of the ideas is to keep these people out of the hospital, so it's not ironic at all. Most of the people who use these centers are homeless and inject themselves in public places in less than sterile conditions. They are more apt to reuse needles and leave their dirty needles laying around. These centers give them a clean, safe place off the streets, and their needles are discarded safely. These centers help protect the public, save money by reducing complications such as HIV spread and skin abcesses among drug users, which we then don't have to treat. In cities where they are being used (none in the US, but they are being used in Canada and Europe) the police actually support them, because they've seen reduction in the things mentioned above. In addition, studies have shown that people who use these centers are actually more likely to end up in drug treatment programs, because they have access to information. Having seen too many homeless patients with terrible skin abcesses from injecting with dirty needles, I think these injection centers are a good thing.
  14. by   anc33
    Quote from SweetOldWorld
    One of the ideas is to keep these people out of the hospital, so it's not ironic at all. Most of the people who use these centers are homeless and inject themselves in public places in less than sterile conditions. They are more apt to reuse needles and leave their dirty needles laying around. These centers give them a clean, safe place off the streets, and their needles are discarded safely. These centers help protect the public, save money by reducing complications such as HIV spread and skin abcesses among drug users, which we then don't have to treat. In cities where they are being used (none in the US, but they are being used in Canada and Europe) the police actually support them, because they've seen reduction in the things mentioned above. In addition, studies have shown that people who use these centers are actually more likely to end up in drug treatment programs, because they have access to information. Having seen too many homeless patients with terrible skin abcesses from injecting with dirty needles, I think these injection centers are a good thing.
    Some people think that these programs are encouraging users to use. Well, they are going to use anyway. Programs like this have a chance to reduce HIV, HCV, HBV, MRSA, etc. They provide education, testing, referrals to rehab. There is a great opportunity to reduce hospitalizations and overall healthcare costs. I personally donate to a great program in DC which provides needle exchange services as well as education, referrals, etc. I chose this program in particular since DC is the only place in the country that receives no federal funding for these types of initiatives.

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