respectable opposition

  1. http://www.michaeljacksontalkradio.c...n_Journal.html

    Can you imagine how the Republicans would be bleating if Al Gore or John Kerry or Ted Kennedy or Bill Clinton had dared utter the vulgarity that the super-respectable Vice President used in an exchange on the Senate floor with Vermont Senator Patrick Leahy? He told the distinguished Senator to [edited]. (I know the Washington Post printed the word in it's short entirety, and that, in all likelihood, will gather more news coverage than the crude outburst by the Veep. Funny world ...always blame the messenger).

    What I feel is sad about such an outburst is that the man from Haliburton appears to be proud of what he said. When asked if he regretted it he responded, "No. I said it." It appears that the encounter was brought on by a recent criticism by Sen. Leahy of the vice president over Haliburton Co. Mr. Cheney, of course, is the former CEO of the enormous oil field services company, and many Democrats have suggested that he has helped win lucrative contracts for his former firm while serving in the Bush administration. Cheney added on CNN "I expressed in no uncertain terms my views of his conduct and walked away." How grown-up. This is the same Vice President who on previous occasions has called for civility between the Republicans and Democrats.

    And with the respectable opposition in mind, I tuned in to a couple of the radio talkshows today in time to hear the hosts berating Michael Moore for his Palme d'Or winning sort-of documentary, "Fahrenheit 9/11." Neither of the hosts had seen the film but were filled with angst and disgust and spoke of the support they had for a Republican group that has filed a complaint with the Federal Election Commission. They have alleged that the marketing - the ads - for the film, would violate the election law. The group is called Citizens United and their point is that the TV advertisements are "pure political propaganda" and they argue that unless the films ads are altered or taken off the air by July 31st, Moore and the distributors of the film would violate the section of the election law that bans the use of corporate money to broadcast ads about a presidential candidate within 30 days of his party's national convention. 'Nuther words, the promotional ads for Fahrenheit 9/11 should be pulled a month before the Republican National Convention, which convenes on August 30th in New York City.

    Bunk! Or, as Michael Toner, a Republican member of the FEC said he thought federal laws clearly gave a filmmaker, such as Michael Moore, the right to market his motion picture however he pleased, with protection normally given to the media.

    I'm willing to compromise (not seriously) ...but if Moore's film is that effectively and unfairly attacking the administration, then might I suggest his screens go dark and all the 99.9% of conservative talkshow hosts, who kowtow to the administration's bidding, who attack democrats as if they are un-American , who blatantly are pro-Bush, be taken off the air for thirty days prior to the convention.

    Two points. Thanks to the hosts who protest so vigorously; they are giving Moore millions in free publicity. And for those who are concerned about the power and influence of the right wing radio folk, as brilliant as some of them are in front of the microphone, how come, with each succeeding election the number of Americans who vote diminishes. Maybe they turn off more people than they turn on.
    Michael
    Last edit by pickledpepperRN on Jun 28, '04
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  2. 8 Comments

  3. by   dphrn
    http://www.worldnetdaily.com/news/ar...TICLE_ID=35997

    Kerry uses the "vulgar" F word in this Rolling Stones article. I haven't heard too much of this from the Republicans. I know, he didn't tell someone to F themselves within earshot of the person, which apparently these exchanges occur often among the politicians. It doesn't become a headline story until a Republican is heard saying it. I guess Kerry wanted his F word to be in print.
  4. by   pickledpepperRN
    I know they are human. How can we expect perfection?

    The point is whether a movie advertisement or the 24/7 political talk radio is considered a violation of federal election law.
  5. by   dphrn
    It appeared your post had a few points. I was responding to your point in the first two paragraphs. Like they say, JMO.
  6. by   pickledpepperRN
    Quote from dphrn
    It appeared your post had a few points. I was responding to your point in the first two paragraphs. Like they say, JMO.
    You are right.

    Remembering the Nixon tapes I doubt many only use respectful 'clean' language behind closed doors. Both parties.
    See, I am doing what I wanted to prevent.
    SO

    What do you think about political TV, radio, advertisements, news, and so on?
    OK? or not?
  7. by   Spidey's mom
    edited post although that John "Blanking" Kerry is what he has been called on the radio since he said the "blank" word in an interview in Rolling Stone. It has been his nickname. Sorry if it offended anyone. I thought this thread was about the "blank" word though.


    steph
    Last edit by Spidey's mom on Jun 28, '04
  8. by   pickledpepperRN
    We know Toms favorite four letter word!
  9. by   gwenith
    Hey! Still doesn't beat one of our Pm's standing up and calling the entire parliment a "mob of Dingo's kidneys" Still trying to work that one out.................
  10. by   pickledpepperRN
    Quote from gwenith
    Hey! Still doesn't beat one of our Pm's standing up and calling the entire parliment a "mob of Dingo's kidneys" Still trying to work that one out.................
    You mean GOLF, a four letter word doesn't beat "mob of Dingo's kidneys"?

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