Reconstruction Plans

  1. Off of Yahoo News:

    Chirac to Join Russia-Germany Talks on Iraq
    57 minutes ago Add World - Reuters to My Yahoo!


    By Ron Popeski

    MOSCOW (Reuters) - Leaders of the main countries opposing the U.S.-led military action against Baghdad will meet this weekend and are expected to press for a major role for the United Nations (news - web sites) in a postwar Iraq (news - web sites).





    A Kremlin statement said French President Jacques Chirac would join Russian President Vladimir Putin (news - web sites) and German Chancellor Gerhard Schroeder at long scheduled talks in Russia's second city of St Petersburg on Friday and Saturday.


    The statement on the meeting in Putin's home town made no mention of any agenda. But it is certain to be topped by discussion on how to proceed with reconstruction in Iraq after the U.S.-led war to remove President Saddam Hussein (news - web sites).


    All three states have adopted a more conciliatory approach as U.S. and British troops advance through Iraq, but say they want the U.N. to be the principal body overseeing reconstruction efforts.


    President Bush (news - web sites) and British Prime Minister Tony Blair (news - web sites) said on Tuesday the United Nations should have a "vital role."


    But it was unclear how much power they believed the U.N. should have outside humanitarian matters.


    A United Nations spokesman in New York denied initial reports, both by the Kremlin and the U.N. office in Moscow, that U.N. Secretary General Kofi Annan (news - web sites) would join the talks on Saturday.


    France, Germany and Russia formed the backbone of opposition to Washington's hawkish stance on Iraq, calling instead for diplomatic efforts through the United Nations to ensure the country was free of alleged weapons of mass destruction.


    CENTRAL U.N. ROLE


    Chirac acknowledged on Tuesday that Iraq had to pass through a "necessary phase of establishing security," but said it would then be up to the U.N. to spearhead efforts to rebuild the country.


    "We are no longer in an era where one or two countries can control the fate of another country," he told a Paris news conference. "Therefore, the political, economic, humanitarian and administrative reconstruction of Iraq is a matter for the United Nations and for it alone."


    Schroeder was equally forthright last week, saying the U.N. "must play the central role as far as the future of Iraq and the new political order is concerned."


    Putin, vociferous in his initial denunciations over Washington's military action, has since said a U.S. defeat is not in Russian interests.


    The Kremlin said at the weekend Putin had stressed in a telephone conversation with Bush "the importance of pursuing an intense political dialogue" to uphold Russia's new alliance with Washington, rooted in support for the U.S. anti-terror campaign.


    But he has also said the Iraqi issue should remain for the U.N. to decide. Other Russian officials have said they hope existing contracts with Iraq, particularly in the oil sector, will be upheld regardless of who is in power in Baghdad.


    In the months running up to the conflict, all three countries backed U.N. Security Council resolution 1441 last November. That led to the resumption of U.N. inspections for banned weapons which the United States accused Saddam of possessing.


    Before hostilities began on March 20, the three issued joint statements criticizing any resort to force and opposing any new resolution endorsing military action.
    The UN should be involved? I agree they should be but I don't feel their role should be as paramount as they seem to feel. I mean, we do want Iraq rebuild and functioning within this century don't we? If the UN takes hold of it, with their track record of accomplishing things, I'm afraid Iraq will never get back on track.
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  2. 19 Comments

  3. by   SmilingBluEyes
    Originally posted by Susy K
    Off of Yahoo News:



    The UN should be involved? I agree they should be but I don't feel their role should be as paramount as they seem to feel. I mean, we do want Iraq rebuild and functioning within this century don't we? If the UN takes hold of it, with their track record of accomplishing things, I'm afraid Iraq will never get back on track.
    I have to agree, Suzy. And I have to wonder if the U.N. as we know it, will even *exist* in a few years. It seems woefully impotent to me. It will be interesting to watch how thing unfold when the war is over and we enter the rebuilding phase.
  4. by   Furball
    I agree with Bush on this one. The UN is quite good with humanitarian issues but I don't trust them to guide the restructure of the Iraqi government....my God....they allowed Hussein to keep control for how long???

    The sooner the Iraqis control their own government the better and the UN has proven to be slower than frozen mollasses.
  5. by   rncountry
    I think that Russia, Germany and France are more concerned about their influence in the middle east then anything else. The UN has a poor track record in terms of countries that are in anarchy, and don't feel that they should have any further role than a humanitarian role.
    It is my belief that if the UN becomes deeply involved Iraq will be little more than "on the dole" and will have great difficulty in building it's own gov't and economy. There needs to be a transistion period and then the Iraqi's need to be able to take control of their country, and not in the traditional model of centuries, but one in which everyone has the ability to be represented. I feel the UN would greatly slow this process.
  6. by   Mimi Wheeze
    Doesn't it just figure... here they all come wanting to help. Out of their concern for the Iraqi people, you know.

    I can't wait to see how this all pans out. Heaven help the Iraqi people if the UN has too much involvement. Those people will starve to death or dehydrate waiting for the UN to get their act together. All the UN should do is work in a Red Cross (yuk) type capacity.
  7. by   SmilingBluEyes
    You know, it all reminds me of the childhood fairy tale of the hen baking bread and asking for help----- No one helps her gather the ingredients, do the kneading, bake the bread, or clean up, but they sure want to reap the rewards, e.g. eating the proceeds. This is no different in my eyes--- and not at all a surprise to me. They all want a piece of the action but don't want dirty hands. Ain't that the way of the world, really?
    Last edit by SmilingBluEyes on Apr 8, '03
  8. by   Mimi Wheeze
    That's exactly what it reminds me of, too! So typical anymore.
  9. by   Furball
    BINGO Deb!
  10. by   Mkue
    Originally posted by rncountry
    I think that Russia, Germany and France are more concerned about their influence in the middle east then anything else.
    I was thinking this too.
  11. by   SmilingBluEyes
    Originally posted by mkue
    I was thinking this too.
    regarding France, Russia and Germany, No surprises here, either. I am amazed how little surprises me anymore when it comes to world politics and events. History indeed repeats itself over and over. If we want to see what will happen, perhaps we need to break out our history books to learn from the past.
  12. by   Mimi Wheeze
    Who needs history books? We have rncountry! :chuckle:
  13. by   Furball
    true....
  14. by   SharonH, RN
    Well according to Mr. Bush today, the entire matter is in the hands of the Iraqi people. So if they want the U.N. (or the U.S.) in, then they are in. It is all up to them.

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