Psssst vettech & other kitty owners....

  1. My baby kitty was spayed two weeks ago. The vet uses a laser for the surgery, so no sutures to remove. When he did my dog, he was new w the laser, and I had to sign a consent esp for the use of the laser. I was sold b/c they cited less bleeding. Post-op, Shelby had a little wound infection and drng, went on ab's and went on to heal eventually w/o comp's.

    Now, baby kitty, well post-op, we tried not to handle her too much, she slept the first two days. When she seemed to finally have the anesthesia out of her system, we moticed a little bulge in the lower end of the incision, most prominent if you picked her up, but it was very soft. I figured it was a little seroma and would reabsorb.

    Now, however, it isn't soft anymore, but not rock-hard either, just firm. I am thinking she has an incisional hernia. Otherwise she seems fine, but her personality has changed a bit. I think the whole expereince of being in the vet has traumatized her, and dammit she got fleas there, every time one of them has to stay over they get fleas, and I have seen the cage area, it is very clean, just a hazard of many animals there at once I suppose.

    Anyway, I am definitely going to call the vet tomorrow, but have any of you seen this in a kitty post-op? Do you think it is from the laser?? Do you think it is b/c after the second day she just went right to jumping to and from high places like usual? I didn't even think she'd be able to jump on my bed which is very high off the ground for her, but she did that first night, to hide from dog I suppose. She plays and she has her night-time snuggly time, but she seems to sleep way more during the day, either that or I have been working more weekends and less weekdays so maybe it is just I am here to observe her more??

    Am I just being paranoid? or do you think it could be something serious? Shewas testing for all kitty diseases pre-op, eating well, and peeing and pooping (Oy does she poop) w/o any problem. What do you think??
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  2. 22 Comments

  3. by   kristi915
    I noticed after our 1st cat was spayed we noticed this bubble type thing in her stomach......it's weird, it's not hard either and it moves all around in there. Plus she's fat so her stomach dangles a little.

    My 2nd cat after she was spayed and declawed she had to stay at the vets also. I held her on the way home and she was very scared and just wanted to sleep in the blanket I had her wrapped in. When we got home it only took her about 5 minutes to realize she was home and she was jumping from high places like you said. She did sleep a lot for that first week.

    I would call the vet just to be sure. Better safe than sorry.
  4. by   hoolahan
    Thanks Kriti for your reply. So no long-term effects from this little bump? I hope it isn't a hernia, I would hate for her to have to have another surgery.
  5. by   kristi915
    Nothing happened because of Coco's bump. She still has it and has had a few appointments since her surgery and the vet never said anything about it. It may just be something natural. Actually, I'm going to go check my other cats stomach to see if she has the same thing. I may get a few scratches from this!

    Nope, Pumpkin dosn't have it..........and I got bit!
    Last edit by kristi915 on Feb 10, '03
  6. by   hoolahan
    Sorry about that Kristi, but thanks for looking!

    Miss Behavin is up here right now, prowling. She knows it is near bed-time and she wants to snuggle. She is such a lovey-dovey!
  7. by   vettech
    Unfortunately I don't have any experience with laser Sx complications. The suggestion you call your vet is a good one. It is likely your instict that it is simply a post-op seroma sounds very reasonable but best to look into its just in case.

    If I had to guess, aside from seroma, it may be a localized reaction to the sutures, which is rather common in kitties.
  8. by   jemb
    One of my cats has had a small lump similar to what you describe since she was spayed ( via traditional surgery) about a decade ago. It is at the end of her scar, has never changed in size, and doesn't seem to bother her. I thought it might be some variation of a keloid.
  9. by   hoolahan
    That is exactly where my kitty's lump is, and the caudal end of the incision.

    Thanks vettech. I appreciate your experience. I forgot to add in the first post, that now the vet does not require a special consent for the laser, b/c I was going to decline it since the problem w my dog post-op, but seems it is the only tool he uses now.

    As an aside, while we were at the vet, he did an awesome job of saving a chihuahua's life. Dog was attacked by a hige dog, who bit him multiple times, and in the chest. The vet actually inserted a chest tube and saved the wee dog's life. They were busy making arrangements to transfer the little guy to the larger animal hospital in the next state, but about a 20-25 min ride. My dog was also there for IV's when she had pancreatitis, and they are an awesome facility.

    I'll let you guys know how it goes.
  10. by   semstr
    you really get your cats declawed? Wow, I would never get that idea! i can't think of a vet doing that either.
  11. by   Ortho_RN
    Originally posted by semstr
    you really get your cats declawed? Wow, I would never get that idea! i can't think of a vet doing that either.
    Why is so hard to think of a Vet who declaws??? It is a VERY common practice.. Just as common and spaying and neutering... If the Vet does the procedure correctly, using pain meds.. The cat will be fine and recooperate in a few days... Both of mine are declawed, and I actually declawed my youngest one, myself when I was working as a CVT....
  12. by   RN2B2005
    Most vets use dissolvable sutures on spay incisions, so there aren't any sutures to take out anyhow; even if removable sutures are used, most cats will take them out on their own as the incision heals. I've never seen a laser used in a spay, and I can't think of any advantage one might offer over traditional cautery technic.

    If I were you, I'd think seriously about finding another vet. Your dog had a post-surgical infection, and now your cat has a swollen suture line, which could be a seroma or another post-surgical infection. Unfortunately, some cost-cutting vets save money by using questionable surgical sterilization procedures. It's not common, but it does happen, not because the vet is trying to make money but because he or she is trying to save money in order to offer lower prices.

    In the future, the best place to have your pet spayed or neutered is at a spay/neuter clinic. They're usually inexpensive, and spays and neuters are all they do, so they do a good job. As a veterinary technician, the best spay and neuter outcomes I've seen with my own pets have been those done at the city-owned spay neuter clinic--tiny incision, low cost, no complications.

    As for the declaw debate, you might try to find a veterinarian who is trained to do a tendonectomy. In this procedure, instead of removing the entire nail, nail bed and part of the bony structure, the veterinarian simply severes the tendons that allow the the cat to contract his claws. You have to keep the nails trimmed for the rest of his life, but most cats can still climb trees, defend themselves, etc. but can't scratch furniture.

    My last cat had this procedure done, and he not only recovered and was walking around without a limp within four hours of surgery, he didn't seem to notice that anything was amiss. It was FAR less traumatic and bloody when compared with a standard declaw, and worked extremely well.

    Good luck.
  13. by   hoolahan
    I never heard of a neuter clinic! If we have them here, it's a well-keot secret. ON the other hand, did you see my post about how this vet saved the chihuahua w emergency surgery and chest tube? I have nothing but respect for this man, as does half our town. The only think I will say I do not like about him is how he shaves, like when they shave the arm a smidge sometimes to get blood, he is too rough. Other than that he has saved my other dog from near death twice. Fortunateky they only get spayed once and that is it.
  14. by   lisamct
    Originally posted by nurs2b
    Why is so hard to think of a Vet who declaws??? It is a VERY common practice.. Just as common and spaying and neutering... If the Vet does the procedure correctly, using pain meds.. The cat will be fine and recooperate in a few days... Both of mine are declawed, and I actually declawed my youngest one, myself when I was working as a CVT....
    I thought the same as semstr about the declawing thing, I dont know where abouts in Europe semstr is but here in the UK it is almost unheard of to declaw a cat.I spoke to my vet about it when my cat was in for shots a few months ago as I'd seen it mentioned in another thread on here, he says its very uncommon and if done it is usually only done for medical reasons(dont know what they might be though )
    Not that I'm totally against the idea of it, its just not something that gets done much over here.

    Lisa

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