Poll: Who has foreign born parents?

  1. Was wondering who has a parent or parents who were not born and raised in the country you are in.

    My mom (or mum) was born and raised in Bavaria in a resort town called Tegernsee. Here's their website, I translated it but most is still in German, but there are some pretty pictures.

    She speaks American English was amazingly with very little accent. She went back to Germany about 30 years after being in the States. Dad was in the Army and stationed there in the mid-50s and took her home.

    It was interesting having a German mom. I was the only one I knew that liked saurkraut and liverwurst. Plus she made a great apple and plum strudle.

    My best friend's mom in college was Korean. I still eat kimchee to this day because of her. It was she who introduced me to the joys of ramen noodles.


    http://translate.google.com/translat...8%26oe%3DUTF-8
    Last edit by Tweety on Apr 21, '04 : Reason: yikes! lots of typos....:)
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  2. 30 Comments

  3. by   LydiaGreen
    My father was born in Kingusie, Scotland - grandparents came over to Canada when he was four years old.

    My mother was born in Cuactemoc, Chi Hua Hua, Mexico on a Mennonite Colony there. The colony moved to Manitoba, Canada when she was ten. Who knows her true roots - their colony was once in Russia, once in Germany, once in Austria, and once in Holland. Those are the places that came up in my uncle's searches for our ancestry but, pretty much we refer to this part of our heritage as Mennonite or Heinz 57 since no one can pinpoint it.

    And me? I AM CANADIAN!
  4. by   Tweety
    Quote from LydiaGreen
    My father was born in Kingusie, Scotland - grandparents came over to Canada when he was four years old.

    My mother was born in Cuactemoc, Chi Hua Hua, Mexico on a Mennonite Colony there. The colony moved to Manitoba, Canada when she was ten. Who knows her true roots - their colony was once in Russia, once in Germany, once in Austria, and once in Holland. Those are the places that came up in my uncle's searches for our ancestry but, pretty much we refer to this part of our heritage as Mennonite or Heinz 57 since no one can pinpoint it.

    And me? I AM CANADIAN!
    Cool.

    I was reading a novel and one of the characters that was autobiographical in nature, about a guy in New Mexico. One of the characters he met while in Mexico was a female who was shunned by her Mennonite community in Mexico. Until I read up on it, I had no idea there were Mennonite communities of European decent in Mexico. For some reason that seems odd, but it shouldn't Mennonites are everywhere.
  5. by   jnette
    Tweety., I'd just LOVE to meet your Mom !!!
    I've been to Tegernsee.. know the area well. Waaaaaaaaaaaaaaah !!!

    My Mom, is from Vienna, so our upbringing was much the same.

    Mom still goes back to Germany/Austria every summer... and she'll be 83 this week !
  6. by   Shamrock
    My mother was born and raised in Ireland. She was a war bride, met my father while working as a nurse in England. As you can tell by my name - Shamrock - and my occupation - RN, I certainly identify with her!. She will be 84 in August.
  7. by   fergus51
    Bio dad and step dad #1 are both foreign born (yes, my family is wierd). One Scottish, one dutch.
  8. by   kimmicoobug
    My mom came over here from Korea when she was 24 years old. She is now 52. She still speaks broken English when she is nervous or around new people, but I would consider her fluent for the most part. She did her best to infuse my sister and I with her culture, such as making us attend Korean school and attending Korean churches and playing with Korean kids. But, we just consider ourselves Americans
  9. by   phn92
    My mother is Japanese! My dad met her in Japan where he was stationed at the time. We live in a small town and it was very rare to have a foreigners in our area when I was growing up. For a long time, she went without any type of Japanese food. We were thrilled when she could find rice! My Japanese relatives knew to bring food when they came to visit! I think one of the most unique part of having a foreign parent is having another culture to grow up with!
  10. by   Angelica
    My parents were Sudetendeutsch from what used to be called Czechoslovakia. After WW2 they were forcefully expelled from their country along with millions of other ethnic Germans. Hundreds of thousands of men, women and children were murdered or died of other causes during the expulsion. Those lucky enough to survive lost their homes and everything else that they could not carry with them. The posessions my mom still owns from her life in Czecholslovakia can be held in one hand.

    It's a human tragedy buried in history and remembered by few.

    Edited to add: Sorry for the depressing post. It's not something I've thought about in a long time and I just wanted to share.
    Last edit by Angelica on Apr 21, '04
  11. by   LauraF, RN
    I'm adopted so don't know my biological folks. Adoptive parents Americans. Hubby though....his Mother and biological father both from France. His adoptive father is from England, his parents from Australia.
  12. by   bigmona
    both my parents were born and raised in poland. they met and got married in the united states, though.

    i spoke polish before i knew english and didn't know english at all when i started kindergarden. i also had to attend polish school growing up. now i can only speak broken polish. i don't practice nearly enough.
  13. by   Tweety
    Quote from Angelica
    My parents were Sudetendeutsch from what used to be called Czechoslovakia. After WW2 they were forcefully expelled from their country along with millions of other ethnic Germans. Hundreds of thousands of men, women and children were murdered or died of other causes during the expulsion. Those lucky enough to survive lost their homes and everything else that they could not carry with them. The posessions my mom still owns from her life in Czecholslovakia can be held in one hand.

    It's a human tragedy buried in history and remembered by few.

    Edited to add: Sorry for the depressing post. It's not something I've thought about in a long time and I just wanted to share.

    That is depressing. But thanks for sharing. That's one of those things in the back of mind somewhere that I heard, but as you say don't remember well. Terrible times those were.
  14. by   Tweety
    Quote from phn92
    My mother is Japanese! My dad met her in Japan where he was stationed at the time. We live in a small town and it was very rare to have a foreigners in our area when I was growing up. For a long time, she went without any type of Japanese food. We were thrilled when she could find rice! My Japanese relatives knew to bring food when they came to visit! I think one of the most unique part of having a foreign parent is having another culture to grow up with!

    That must have been hard for your mother. Asking an Asian to do without rice is just unheard of. LOL

    I love Japanese food and often buy instant miso-seaweed soup at the Asian store here.

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