P.C. re: Names. Does Jr. become non Jr. when Sr. passes??

  1. Here is the question.

    If a son is named Jr. at birth.....named after his dad, Jr.
    When the dad expires.....say Jr. is 30 years old...............,
    then Jr. drops that designation after his name ,,,,,, right?

    Because, there is no longer a Sr.......so Jr., just uses his
    name on the birth certificate, without the Jr. ....right?
    •  
  2. 13 Comments

  3. by   J-RN student
    If you were to die would your mom still be a mother?
  4. by   BranRN
    ding ding ding...we have a winner.

    Plus his birth certificate still says Jr. You wouldn't have it changed would you? If he were to drop the Jr. it would as if his father nevr existed.
  5. by   baseline
    So my grandfather who is the original and my dad who is a Jr. are both dead and my brother who is now the 111 suddenly becomes the first? or does he revert only back to Jr. Or do the existance of said Sr, and Jr. become non-existant.
  6. by   Flynurse
    And if all of the planets were in alignment and Jr. wasn't Sr. because Sr. fell off the face of the earth, so Jr. wasn't Jr. but Sr. was still alive, but no one knew it so Jr. was still Jr. but he name his son with Jr. but Jr. was really the III so now who is who?

    Just Kidding! :chuckle

    I don't know the answer. I guess it would depend on whether or not it were on the birth certificates.
  7. by   dianah
    I think the Jr remains, and if he names HIS kid after himself, the kid becomes "the third" (as in Thurston Howell the Third), and the next generation, if naming the same continues, becomes the Fourth (IV). etc. Make sense???
  8. by   Nurse Ratched
    Actually, once the senior person dies, it is correct from an etiquette standpoint for the junior to drop the junior from his name as there is no longer a need to distinguish himself from the older (no one to confuse him with.) If there is a 3rd, the 3rd person keeps the 3rd designation.

    I'll look for a link, but I had it on very good authority from a Miss Manners or Emily Post book lol.
  9. by   passing thru
    Thanks. There is no III.

    I am still curious about this. I recall reading it was apropo
    to drop the Jr. designation, but I can't recall the details.
    And, haven't been able to find it on the net.
  10. by   Zee_RN
    My husband is a Jr. of a deceased Sr. and even if we were able to drop it, we wouldn't. Banks, mailings, etc. still have record of a Sr. so it helps to prevent confusion. His mom lives in the same town and we shop/bank at a lot of the same places--and she hasn't necessarily taken her deceased husband's name off of things. Prime example for most widows is the phone bill...they leave it in the husband's name so that it doesn't appear that a lone female is residing in the house.
  11. by   P_RN
    If they do drop the junior etc it makes for a genealogical research NIGHTMARE! My family has William Henry, Henry William, William Henry etc down the generations. If that's not bad enough there are several III, and IVs.

    Plus here in the South you have guys nick named "Trey" meaning the third......oh I am so happy that at the last possible second I avoided having our son named junior. He has his dad's first name as a middle name.
  12. by   SingingNurse2
    The men in my husband's family all have the same middle name. It makes it much simpler in the long run. You have the family pride thing going on, but still get to retain your individuality.
  13. by   Tilleycs
    Actually, once the senior person dies, it is correct from an etiquette standpoint for the junior to drop the junior from his name as there is no longer a need to distinguish himself from the older (no one to confuse him with.) If there is a 3rd, the 3rd person keeps the 3rd designation.
    I'm not sure about the "etiquette authority" point of view (and could honestly care less), but it's coming across like whether you should just act like they never existed once they die ("Whew! Finally! Now I can drop 'Jr.' from the end of my name!"). If I were named after my father and he died, I'd STILL be <name>, Jr. There will still people who'd remember my father. IMO, don't worry about whether there's someone to get you confused with. I'm sure people could communicate whether it were me or my father they were talking about.

    What if people want to KEEP the "Jr." to remember and honor their father/grandfather? Are they in violation of the sacred rules of etiquette???
  14. by   ats
    Legally, you are still Jr. once the father dies. Some choose not to use it except in legal forms... but in the case of my grandfather, for example, who was a Sr. (and a public figure), it only made sense for my father to keep the Jr., to distinguish them.

    The son of Sr. is called Jr. However, if someone else in the family is given the name in question (say for example that John Sr.'s brother names his own son John), that person becomes John II. You guessed it... then John II's son becomes John III. I only remember this happening when Jr. does not have a son he's blessed with the special name... but I suppose if he did, his son would ALSO be John III. We all on the same page here?

    Ah, geneaology is indeed a fascinating subject.

close