on a lighter note....a RN or an RN? - page 2

I can't help but notice so many posters here say "an RN" instead of "a RN." For example: "When I went to school to become an RN it was much different than it is now." I personally would say,... Read More

  1. by   minnymi
    well, i guess i will be a weirdo and start typing out registered nurse because it just feels so wrong!
  2. by   Stephalump
    Quote from minnymi
    well, i guess i will be a weirdo and start typing out registered nurse because it just feels so wrong!
    Hah!! Or you can just type A RN. I won't judge.
  3. by   CompleteUnknown
    Quote from Stephalump
    Hah!! Or you can just type A RN. I won't judge.
    Lol @ 'I won't judge'. I bet others will though! Arguments on allnurses have NOTHING on arguments on writing/grammar/spelling sites.
  4. by   BlueDevil,DNP
    All of this time I have believed "an RN" to be grammatically incorrect. I sit corrected. It can stop annoying the stuffing out of me now, lol.
  5. by   minnymi
    Quote from BlueDevil,DNP
    All of this time I have believed "an RN" to be grammatically incorrect. I sit corrected. It can stop annoying the stuffing out of me now, lol.
    amen! at least i'm not the only one...
  6. by   litchi
    i think the rule is based on whether or not the word starts with a consonant sound, not the word starting with a consonant itself.

    i found this from dailywritingtips.com:

    [color=#333333]
    the rule states that "a" should be used before words that begin with consonants (e.g., b, c ,d) while "an" should be used before words that begin with vowels (e.g., a,e,i). notice, however, that the usage is determined by the pronunciation and not by the spelling, as many people wrongly assume.
    [color=#333333]you should say, therefore, "an hour" (because hour begins with a vowel sound) and "a history" (because history begins with a consonant sound). [color=#333333]similarly you should say "a union" even if union begins with a "u." that is because the pronunciation begins with "yu", which is a consonant sound.
  7. by   sharpeimom
    i say "an rn" when i speak it. when my linguist/grammarian/college professor comes
    home, i'll run it by him.
  8. by   nursecindylange
    Exactly, litchi!

    an 1 (n; n when stressed)indef.art. The form of a used before words beginning with a vowel or with an unpronounced h: an elephant; an hour.

    an1 (ən; when stressed æn)
    indefinite article. the form of a 1 before an initial vowel sound(an arch; an honor)
  9. by   Keliana
    Elements of Style (English language) indicates "an R.N." to be correct .
  10. by   RNOTODAY
    an RN , but if spelling out the words... its
    A Registered Nurse
  11. by   confettireads
    I have always wondered about this. Glad I stumbled across this! TIL it is "an RN."
  12. by   toomuchbaloney
    I learned this during my primary education years. When did you first learn it?

    I don't intend to sound judgmental, I just was surprised by the number of people who were uncertain.

    I'm more often confused by you and I vs you and me conundrums.
  13. by   No Stars In My Eyes
    Stephalump said everything I was going to say, so I'll stick with her take on the matter.

    Amen!

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