Nursing Ethics: About The Weather - page 3

Winter is over here, and summer is on its way. I count myself to be fortunate in the extreme that I didn't have to stay overnight at the hospital this winter. Yet it seemed to snow every single... Read More

  1. by   MALENURSE50
    If you are a nurse you must consider the patients needs in front of your own
  2. by   mkahnlpn
    Quote from MALENURSE50
    If you are a nurse you must consider the patients needs in front of your own
    oh my....thats a whoooooooooole other thread!
  3. by   billyboblewis
    I have lived in all types of climates in my life. I have always prepared myself for transportation and daily needs in every climate I have lived. In Maine where at one point it snows every day I had no problem getting to work and neither did the other people on staff with me. People who have problems are people who have problems with life in general. There are always huge storms but in this day and time we have sufficent time to prepare. During many of the hurricane periods in Louisiana we were allowed to bring our families and pets to live out the storm with us in the hospital. There may be some extreme emergency that causes us to miss work but these are rare. Family personal emergencys are of course a totally different story.
  4. by   nurse.sandi
    Great post. Well said!!
  5. by   NewerMaineNurse
    I attempted to drive to work today but had to turn back around after being "white-washed" several times (and I guess my guilt landed me in this forum). I tried to brave the road conditions, however, decided to turn back around as I remembered the last time I went off the road trying to "brave the weather." I feel terrible that I had to call out, and obviously had every intention of going in, but then realized I am no good to anyone dead or severely injured...how good are you to your patients then (patients or family)? I suppose that is why the facility is supposed to have a plan in place for those who absolutely cannot make it. And don't work in a snow belt? Who is going to then? I think we'd be working shorter than we already are if only those who were dedicated to killing themselves were to work in such a location. Yes, we are nurses, and we risk every day of our lives and stay long hours and don't leave our patients, etc...but...there is a limit.
  6. by   OCNRN63
    Quote from NewerMaineNurse
    I attempted to drive to work today but had to turn back around after being "white-washed" several times (and I guess my guilt landed me in this forum). I tried to brave the road conditions, however, decided to turn back around as I remembered the last time I went off the road trying to "brave the weather." I feel terrible that I had to call out, and obviously had every intention of going in, but then realized I am no good to anyone dead or severely injured...how good are you to your patients then (patients or family)? I suppose that is why the facility is supposed to have a plan in place for those who absolutely cannot make it. And don't work in a snow belt? Who is going to then? I think we'd be working shorter than we already are if only those who were dedicated to killing themselves were to work in such a location. Yes, we are nurses, and we risk every day of our lives and stay long hours and don't leave our patients, etc...but...there is a limit.
    ​Going in to work early, in advance of the inclement weather, makes it safe to travel and ensures adequate staffing.
  7. by   nurseprnRN
    Ah, the joys of being self-employed and having a home-based practice. I spent the morning shoveling in near-record cold, but at least I'm not driving. Now I'm cozy by the fire, accompanied by three loony cats (and one not-so-loony) and a husband who is post-shoveling napping on the couch. Think I'll call it a day and go read a book for pleasure.
  8. by   NurseQT
    Quote from OCNRN63
    ​Going in to work early, in advance of the inclement weather, makes it safe to travel and ensures adequate staffing.
    But not every nurse has the option of going in early, in advance of the weather!!! And once there they may need to get home after their shift is over. A nurse who is also a single mother of young children may not have that option. Not everyone has a support system to fall back on and leaving their kids for an extra 12 hours is not feasible. I was hit head on by a semi on the freeway during a snowstorm. I was driving an 4x4 SUV but because the road was covered in ice as well as snow the 4x4 did nothing and my truck did a 180. The officer who came said that if my truck had ended up sideways the semi would have t-boned me and I along with my two youngest daughters would be dead.... Add to that the fact that we sat out on the freeway for over three hours waiting for the officer to show up. My two older children who were 7 and 5 at the time got home from school and there was no one home! They had to wait all alone in the house for over two hours! I didn't have a cellphone at the time and had no way of calling them! They had no idea where I was, imagine how terrified they were! To this day I am terrified of driving in bad conditions and if I feel that it's too dangerous than I don't even try. Does that mean I call in everytime it snows? Of course not, I have only called in d/t bad weather once in over 10 years. I have been late but still made it on several occasions but if it's too dangerous and I don't feel safe driving you can bet I will call in.
  9. by   cbreuklander
    I still believe that good critical thinking skills were necessary to become licensed. We should be able to be trusted to use them when there is a decision about whether it is safe to come to work. Yes, patients need to be taken care of and I understand that. Patients need to be taken care of when I have a fever also, and I am not coming to work then. We are nurses, not gods. Life happens.
  10. by   StNeotser
    I have yet to not turn up to work due to a weather event. In fact I turned up once when there was a weather event and I was not scheduled. I made sure, on the advice of someone on allnurses in 2003 to make sure that if they said they were sending a hummer to pick me up, that same hummer would be available to take me home. 3 foot of snow had fallen and nobody unless they were essential personnel were going anywhere. I know that I am required to be professional but administration are not.

    Furthermore, I am certain that this is always going to be essential reading for nurses going to work in the event of a natural disaster.

    auryn24: Hurricane Katrina update #1
  11. by   b981
    It's your responsibility to find care for elderly parents, children, and pets or the hospital will let you bring them with you. Seriously what planet do you live on? I've never worked at a hospital that let me bring children, parents and pets to work. Is the hospital going to up your pay to provide day care and if so the day care is probably closed. Not everyone has relatives, neighbors and friends to take care of things. You need to come back down to Earth. Emergencies happen. Most of us are not slackers and work to cover slackers, but old school nurses seem to be harsh when people call out for weather.
  12. by   wondern
    Quote from Ruby Vee
    the author has lived in the mountains of washington state... sometimes those alternatives involve coming to town a day early and renting a motel room or sleeping at a friend's home.
    the author understands bad and unpredictable weather, but the author has seen too many people who use bad weather as an excuse to stay home... the article is aimed more at those who have a tendency to fold their arms, lie back and say "it's not my fault i couldn't make it to work. it snowed." ...if a 20 minute drive turns into four hours, people are going to be late. but if you're on the road headed to work, the staff you're relieving may only have to work 16 hours rather than 24 or 36...in decades of nursing, i've missed just one shift because of the weather -- when the snowmobile sent by the hospital... i put on my cross country skis and skiied 2 miles to the main road -- but the hospital drivers couldn't get there either. i made it in to work 12 hours late after the plows had made a path and relieved some of the folks who had been working most of the previous 24 hours.
    ...yes, it sucks to leave your family with the lights off and snow so high you had to climb out a second story window . . . but do you think the weather is any better on the other side of town? someone has to take care of the patients.
    I totally agree. Way to get there, Ruby V!
    ...Or ask the hospital if you can stay there.
    A 45 minute ride took me 6 hours one day but I was very thankful it was going home not going to. I slipped and slid into work plenty of times though. It's kind of a bonding experience. We all made it in alive...again...thank God!

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