nurses & docs deployed? How to circumvent?

  1. I was listening to one of the docs at work discussing the risk/fear of being deployed. He doesn't want to interrupt his life right now. He is in the guard. I am curious how this works. My nephew just finished 4 years in the marines--he finished last October. He isn't being deployed.
    Do people volunteer for the National Guard? What are the risks vs. benefits?
    I'm not sure I understand why mothers of young children would volunteer . That's why I'm thinking it must be mandatory after service. ????????
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  2. 13 Comments

  3. by   memphispanda
    When you sign up for the military, you are in for a certain amount of time. You basically have given them the right to call you up when they need you. All of that is explained to people when they sign up. Too many people signed up just for the benefits without considering that there was a possibility of going to war. Yes, it is mandatory.
  4. by   bagladyrn
    This doc "doesn't want his life interrupted"?!? What gall! If he signed the papers and accepted the benefits he now owes the obligated service! What exactly did he think he was signing up for? Just to serve if it was convenient?
  5. by   2ndCareerRN
    This doc "doesn't want his life interrupted"?!? What gall! If he signed the papers and accepted the benefits he now owes the obligated service! What exactly did he think he was signing up for? Just to serve if it was convenient?
    Yep, what she said. And she said it so much nicer than I would have.

    bob
  6. by   cindyln
    "Doesn't want his life interrupted?"
    Seeing red here at that statement!! He signed up,received the benefits and PAY but when the time comes to do his job he doesn't want his life interrupted!?!?!?! What about the poor people in the WTC or those killed by terrorists everyday or the BRAVE men and women already with their lives interrupted?? Does he think that they asked for this?? Tell him to grow some and serve his country when it calls. THEN he can call himself an American!! If I could lay my hands on him now!!!![
  7. by   Mkue
    I don't think it is mandatory after service. My son is joining the Marine Reserves, not for the benefits, he learned of the benefits after he made a decision to join, knowing full well that he could be called up after Boot Camp.
  8. by   Rustyhammer
    Well,
    He could always...

    ...LEAVE THE COUNTRY!!
    -Russell
  9. by   passing thru
    Are these lifetime benefits, e.g. going to VA hospitals and clinics? Memphispanda: If I sign up for a certain length of time, say 4 years, then I do 3 in the service and the last year in the national guard, right. ? After that, I would not have to worry about being called up..correct?
    You all sound angry. There's several fussing about having their lives interrupted and one mom in particular, and the original doc, yes, he is big time complaining, didn't think he would "ever have to."
  10. by   kaycee
    One of our nurses just got home from Afganistan a few months ago. He has two small children. He was just deployed again to Kuwait. He'll be gone for 6 months. Yes it interrupts his life and he will miss his family but he is proud to serve his country and was eager to go. He is in Special Forces and is always where the action is. We are very proud of him and hope and pray he stays safe.
  11. by   cactus wren
    Oh...Poor widdle baby...!!!! GRRRRRR....No more. gotta think out reply
    Last edit by cactus wren on Feb 15, '03
  12. by   SmilingBluEyes
    They have a nice place at Ft. Leavenworth, Kansas that will REALLY "interrupt life" for a while---NOT to report for duty constitutes AWOL (and in wartime, penalties can be REALLY TOUGH)....... and if they are stupid enough to do this, they deserve what they get. They dishonor us veterans and current active-duty who do and/or DID our time w/o p*ssing and whining.......Tell those p*ssers and moaners to RESIGN their commissions (and gov't paychecks) if they don't want to do their duty...the one THEY SWORE they would DO regardless. Meantime, their a$$es belong to the U. S. Gov't, whether they like it or not. NO sympathy from this vet here!. And yes, friends, it is an ALL VOLUNTEER FORCE, no one is drafted (yet) so tell em they get what they signed up for,period.
    Last edit by SmilingBluEyes on Feb 15, '03
  13. by   Q.
    Originally posted by passing thru
    Are these lifetime benefits, e.g. going to VA hospitals and clinics? Memphispanda: If I sign up for a certain length of time, say 4 years, then I do 3 in the service and the last year in the national guard, right. ? After that, I would not have to worry about being called up..correct?
    No. The Army National Guard is a totally different branch of the military, like the Air Guard, Marines, etc.
    In all branches, your total committment is 6-8 years, meaning, if you enlist for 4 years, you are 4 years active duty, you can either get out, go Reserves, change branches; then for the remaining 2 or 4 years you can either spend it in the Reserves, a different branch, or you can do nothing but risk being reactivated. Example: my husband served a total of 10 enlisted years, therefore, once he left the National Guard, he can no longer be called up, because he has given the committment of 6-8 years. He enlisted in the Army and served 5 years active duty, then once that enlistment was up, he re-enlisted for Army National Guard as a Reservist. He did his mandatory committment and now he's done. (I can't remember if it's 6 or 8, someone help me here).

    As far as lifetime benefits, they aren't terribly significant, and depends on length of service. My husband got his college paid for, we got a VA loan, and he's eligible for VA health care if he wants.

    But you don't automatically go to the National Guard in your last year. The National Guard is no cake-walk. My husband's unit was a level 1 in preparedness and was an infantry unit.
    Last edit by Susy K on Feb 15, '03
  14. by   natsfanrn
    My hubby is active component of the Army National Guard... From what I understand, it is a lifetime commitment if you're an officer (which the dr likely is). You can be called up at any time, but then again, you know that when you sign the papers and accept your free education...

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