Normal diplomacy or ???

  1. http://www.observer.co.uk/iraq/story...905936,00.html
    http://www.observer.co.uk/iraq/story...905954,00.html
    US plan to bug Security Council: the text

    Online document: The text of the memorandum
    detailing the US plan to bug the phones and emails of
    key Security Council members, revealed in today's
    Observer

    Sunday March 2, 2003

    To: [Recipients withheld]
    From: FRANK KOZA@Chief of Staff (Regional Target) CIV/NSA
    on 31/01/2003 0:16
    Subject: Reflections of Iraq debate/votes at UN - RT actions and
    potential for related contributions
    Importance: High
    TOP SECRET/COMINT/XL

    All,

    As you've likely heard by now, the Agency is mounting a surge
    particularly directed at the UN Security Council (UNSC)
    members (minus US and GBR of course) for insights as to how
    to membership is reacting to the on-going debate RE: Iraq,
    plans to vote on any related resolutions, what related policies/
    negotiating positions they may be considering, alliances/
    dependencies, etc - the whole gamut of information that could
    give US policymakers an edge in obtaining results favorable to
    US goals or to head off surprises. In RT, that means a QRC
    surge effort to revive/ create efforts against UNSC members
    Angola, Cameroon, Chile, Bulgaria and Guinea, as well as extra
    focus on Pakistan UN matters.

    We've also asked ALL RT topi's to emphasize and make sure
    they pay attention to existing non-UNSC member UN-related
    and domestic comms for anything useful related to the UNSC
    deliberations/ debates/ votes. We have a lot of special
    UN-related diplomatic coverage (various UN delegations) from
    countries not sitting on the UNSC right now that could contribute
    related perspectives/ insights/ whatever. We recognize that we
    can't afford to ignore this possible source.
    •  
  2. 13 Comments

  3. by   Mkue
    Maybe I'm reading too quickly, but where in the memo does it mention using "bugs"? I see that they are looking for related perspectives/insights/whatever. Looking over the whole article there is mention of indirect access and that could mean a lot of things.

    thanks, mkue
  4. by   molecule
    the NSA is a secret type intelligence agency, they don't just sit around reading the paper and listening to the radio, the National Security Agency intercepts e-mail and telephone communications.

    http://www.nsa.gov/about_nsa/index.html
    Last edit by molecule on Mar 2, '03
  5. by   Q.
    I think there may be a lot of other possible reasons for certain countries (France, Germany, Russia) to oppose war that aren't necessarily diplomatic. Perhaps the US is trying to pinpoint that.
  6. by   DebsZoo
    .
    Last edit by DebsZoo on Apr 20, '03
  7. by   Dplear
    The old saying goes..keep your enemies close and your "friends" even closer......
    just because they are the enemy of my enemy does not make them my friend.

    Dave
  8. by   Dplear
    STANDING FIRM: BUT PAPER ADMITS TRANSLATION GOOF; WORDS IN ALLEGED NSA EMAIL ALTERED FOR BRITISH SPELLING

    London's OBSERVER newssheet altered words of a "top secret" email from a alleged National Security Agency worker -- an email which detailed a U.S. plan to spy on key U.N. Security Council members!

    "The email was originally transcribed with English spellings standardised for a British audience," the paper claimed on Sunday after the DRUDGE REPORT revealed the oddity of an American government worker typing favorable as 'favourable', recognize as 'recognise' and emphasize as 'emphasise'.

    MORE

    Other errors also appeared in the paper's online document of the purported email text. The spelling of the NSA official's name was strangely changed from "Frank Koza" to "Frank Kozu"; and the top secret marker of "Top Secret//COMINT//XL" should have read "Top Secret//COMINT//X1" to conform to any government coding.

    The multiple errors immediately ignited questions about the authenticity of the email and raised credibility issues over the entire OBSERVER report.

    "Secret document details American plan to bug phones and emails of key Security Council members ahead of crucial vote over war on Iraq,' splashed the OBSERVER in a world exclusive.

    The compelling report took more than 3 weeks to develop, research and confirm, an OBSERVER insider said on Sunday.

    Spelling alterations and typographical slip-ups not withstanding, editors of the OBSERVER are standing tough behind the results of the paper's investigation.
  9. by   Mkue
    It is also one of the most important centers of foreign language analysis and research within the Government.
    _______________________________________________
    www.nsa.gov/about_nsa/index.html


    I'm impressed.
  10. by   molecule
    http://hem.fyristorg.com/emailsynaren/en/
    Foreign government agencies and embassies

    Governments and foreign embassies conduct larges scale organized and unorganised wire-tapping. Officially this is to combat terrorism, fight crime and to ensure the safety of the nation. In practice a lot of it can be described as corporate espionage.

    The state-of-the-art system is the "Echelon" system run by the National Security Agency (NSA) of the US. NSA is fittingly called the "computer-CIA" and they can - on an hitherto unprecedented scale scan ALL e-mail, faxes and phone-calls, of ALL countries. This high-tech espionage operation is rumoured to employ close to 40,000 people and most of what they are up to is shrouded in secrecy. As of late, Echelon has been very much in the news thanks to enquiries conducted by the European Parliament. The EP is worried that the system infringes on civil liberties and that it conducts high-level industrial espionage.
    ---------------



    remember when the US was building a new embassy in the USSR years ago and the 'bugging' devices were built right in the walls by the Soviets?
    Last edit by molecule on Mar 2, '03
  11. by   semstr
    So, what's new?
  12. by   emily_mom
    Originally posted by Dplear
    The old saying goes..keep your enemies close and your "friends" even closer......
    just because they are the enemy of my enemy does not make them my friend.

    Dave
    Well said.
  13. by   pickledpepperRN
    Originally posted by molecule
    http://hem.fyristorg.com/emailsynaren/en/
    Foreign government agencies and embassies

    Governments and foreign embassies conduct larges scale organized and unorganised wire-tapping. Officially this is to combat terrorism, fight crime and to ensure the safety of the nation. In practice a lot of it can be described as corporate espionage.
    ----------------------------
    remember when the US was building a new embassy in the USSR years ago and the 'bugging' devices were built right in the walls by the Soviets?
    I sure remember it. The TV and press went on and on about how wrong it was. The politicians from both parties and commentators were outraged.
  14. by   Mkue
    thanks for the link !
    Last edit by mkue on Mar 5, '03

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