NFL players kneeling during the National Anthem - page 2

Unless you live in a cave you’ve heard and seen the controversy over NFL players kneeling during the national anthem prior to games. Like most topics these days the country is very divided over... Read More

  1. by   nursej22
    Quote from toomuchbaloney
    Taking a knee during the anthem is not being disrespectful to the anthem, or the flag, or the military. That is the narrative of the POTUS who prefers to change the focus from the racist targeting of blacks within our criminal justice justice system to a jingoist and racist dog whistle.. The big boss white man changed that narrative to suit HIS agenda (which seems to coincide ideologically with those fine people caring torches).
    Since when did kneeling become a sign of disrespect?
    Soldiers kneel to honor fallen comrades
    Worshipers kneel in church, some at bedside before retiring
    Men kneel to propose
    Brits kneel when knighted
  2. by   HappyMom5
    Quote from BCgradnurse
    I respect your views and beliefs. Something you said stood out to me. You said you would never disprespect any SYMBOL of your freedom. Cool. The flag and the anthem are just symbols. Real freedom is expressed and honored when ALL people have the same freedoms. In my opinion, we disrespect our freedom and those who fought for it when we deny these freedoms to other Americans because of their race, religion, or sexual orientation. Symbols don't matter; people do.
    I agree that symbols don't matter but people do and that is precisely why I have the same opinion as the OP. The flag is a symbol that is extremely important to our veterans; those people that have fought and sacrificed so much to ensure that the rich NFL players have the right to protest. But why protest in a way that disrespects the symbol that means so much to our veterans?
  3. by   BCgradnurse
    Quote from HappyMom5
    I agree that symbols don't matter but people do and that is precisely why I have the same opinion as the OP. The flag is a symbol that is extremely important to our veterans; those people that have fought and sacrificed so much to ensure that the rich NFL players have the right to protest. But why protest in a way that disrespects the symbol that means so much to our veterans?
    BECAUSE IT ISN'T ABOUT THE "RICH NFL PLAYERS"!!!! Don't you get it? It is about them using their visibility and status to speak for those who do not have a voice. It is about knowing that people will see them and hopefully take to heart the reason why they are protesting. It has nothing whatsoever to do with veterans. People are so stuck on that. The same people who are swilling beer and hooting and hollering at games while the anthem is being played and not paying attention. Yet I hear very few saying "what can I do to combat racism in this country." Many veterans support the players. They believe the freedom they fought for pertains to those with black or brown skin, too,and their sacrifice was for naught if we all don't have the same rights.
    Last edit by BCgradnurse on Oct 3
  4. by   ElvishDNP
    Quote from HappyMom5
    I agree that symbols don't matter but people do and that is precisely why I have the same opinion as the OP. The flag is a symbol that is extremely important to our veterans; those people that have fought and sacrificed so much to ensure that the rich NFL players have the right to protest. But why protest in a way that disrespects the symbol that means so much to our veterans?
    I hate to break it to everyone here, but people in the military aren't ensuring our rights and haven't been for some time. They're fighting to protect US interests (a broad necessarily vague term) abroad. Smedley Butler (USMC) knew this 80+ years ago and wrote about it. Most people I know who've served knew this or figured it out while they were in. I have respect for my brother, father, stepfather, grandfather, and uncle, who all served, but I don't go around pretending they're heroes. They're just people who signed up for various reasons and did their jobs with varying amounts of diligence and efficacy, and who have mixed feelings about their service.

    But for the sake of argument, let's pretend they're actually defending my freedoms. Who are you, who am I, who is anyone to patronize them by speaking for them and assuming a flag is some sacred thing to them? Let them speak for themselves. Some have a problem with the players kneeling, some kneel alongside them because they're woke enough to understand why NFL players are kneeling.

    What's not being said (but it's loud and clear in the subtext) is that people would rather these guys not protest at all. Shut up, stay in your place.
  5. by   Lil Nel
    So true, Elvish. The Iraqi War wasn't about protecting our rights, or anybody else's rights. It was about lies that the Bush administration chose to believe (with a big push from Donald Rumsfeld).

    In fact, I remember going up to a service member at an airport around that time and saying: "You aren't there because of me." I protested against that war.

    And you are right, who gets to decide on behalf of ALL veterans and dictate how they feel.

    Veterans are just like the rest of the general population. By that, I mean they have many differing opinions.

    Nothing changes until you make the comfortable feel uncomfortable. Kudos to Colin Kaepernick.
  6. by   elkpark
    Quote from HappyMom5
    I agree that symbols don't matter but people do and that is precisely why I have the same opinion as the OP. The flag is a symbol that is extremely important to our veterans; those people that have fought and sacrificed so much to ensure that the rich NFL players have the right to protest. But why protest in a way that disrespects the symbol that means so much to our veterans?
    I've seen plenty of veterans on TV (or heard them on the radio), being interviewed about this controversy, saying that the reason they joined the military and put themselves in harm's way was to defend this country's precious freedoms, including the First Amendment and the right of the NFL players to protest by kneeling during the anthem. Don't be too quick to assume you know how veterans feel about the protests, or that their views are monolithic.
  7. by   heron
    Would someone please explain to me why kneeling to mourn unjustly murdered Black men and pay respect to their lives equals disrespect for the flag or the national anthem? It seems to me that this attempt to erase the original meaning of the players' protest is what's disrespectful to our flag, our anthem and our constitution. Do you really believe that our soldiers fight and die to preserve a murderous legacy of slavery and European white supremacy?
    Last edit by heron on Oct 4
  8. by   Lil Nel
    Quote from heron
    Would someone please explain to me why kneeling to mourn unjustly murdered Black men and pay respect to their lives equals disrespect for the flag or the national anthem? It seems to me that this attempt to erase the original meaning of the players' protest is what's disrespectful to our flag, our anthem and our constitution. Do you really believe that our soldiers fight and die to preserve a murderous legacy of slavery and European white supremacy?
    It is disrespectful because the Bum and Sarah Huckabee Sanders say so.
  9. by   Farawyn
    Quote from toomuchbaloney
    So you agree with their right to protest peacefully and legally, in any way they prefer, just not that way.

    Got it.
    This is all I can say, too. It's been done to death.
  10. by   Farawyn
    Quote from heron
    Would someone please explain to me why kneeling to mourn unjustly murdered Black men and pay respect to their lives equals disrespect for the flag or the national anthem? It seems to me that this attempt to erase the original meaning of the players' protest is what's disrespectful to our flag, our anthem and our constitution. Do you really believe that our soldiers fight and die to preserve a murderous legacy of slavery and European white supremacy?
    'Cause white men wanna relax and just watch football, dontcha know?
  11. by   ElvishDNP
    'Daily' was probably a bit of hyperbole on my part, though I would be willing to bet my house that 'brutalization' occurs daily in a way that does not affect white people nearly as much if at all.

    The Washington Post has kept track of police killing of civilians since 2015. So far 738 people have been killed by police this year. That's well over one a day, though certainly those killed were not only Black people. It is still sobering.

    Police shootings 217 database - Washington Post
    Last edit by AN Admin Team on Oct 5 : Reason: quoted removed post
  12. by   toomuchbaloney
    It's difficult to speak in comprehensive numbers because police and sheriff departments are not required to compile and report on that information. It's not like healthcare where the death or injury is reported and included in national databases for study.
  13. by   nurseactivist
    I am more concerned about my biracial son coming home alive. Can't tell you how many times he got stopped by cops for no apparent reason. There is nothing like riding by and stopping to see your child spread eagle on the ground while my car was searched.

    He always says, "don't trip, mom." They always let me go, I have insurance, license, etc.

    YES, I TRIP... (This white lady has never been stopped by cops in my 60+ years)

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