Naysayers tight-lipped since success of Iraq vote

  1. Naysayers tight-lipped since success of Iraq vote
    By James G. Lakely
    THE WASHINGTON TIMES
    Published February 2, 2005

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    Skeptics of President Bush's attempt to bring democracy to Iraq have been largely silent since Iraqis enthusiastically turned out for Sunday's elections.
    Billionaire Bush-basher George Soros and left-wing filmmaker Michael Moore were among critics of the administration's Iraq policy who had no comment after millions of Iraqis went to the polls in their nation's first free elections in decades.
    The Carter Center determined that the security situation in Iraq was going to be too dangerous to send election monitors, so the Atlanta-based human rights organization founded by former President Jimmy Carter posted its personnel in neighboring Jordan.
    Despite widespread predictions of spectacular terrorist attacks on election day in Iraq, fewer than 50 were killed, and the 60 percent turnout for the elections was much higher than many predicted.
    Asked whether the Carter Center had a comment on the election, spokeswoman Kay Torrance said: "We wouldn't have any 'yea' or 'nay' statement on Iraq."
    Mr. Carter told NBC's "Today" show in September that he was confident the elections would not take place. "I personally do not believe they're going to be ready for the election in January ... because there's no security there," he said.
    Mr. Soros, the Open Society Institute founder who contributed millions of dollars to groups seeking to prevent Mr. Bush's re-election, had denounced as a "sham" the administration's plans for a democratic Iraq.
    "To claim that we are invading Iraq for the sake of establishing democracy is a sham, and the rest of the world sees it as such," Mr. Soros said in a Washington speech in March 2003, adding that "the trouble goes much deeper."
    "It is not merely that the Bush administration's policies may be wrong, it is that they are wrong," Mr. Soros said in the speech. "Because we are unquestionably the most powerful, [the Bush administration claims] we have earned the right to impose our will on the rest of the world."
    Mr. Soros' Web site (www.georgesoros.com) has no reference to the Iraqi elections. Its latest comments are in a Jan. 26 op-ed article on what Mr. Soros calls Mr. Bush's "ambitious" second inaugural address.
    "Mr. Soros has not released any statements about the elections in Iraq," said Soros spokesman Michael Vachon. "He has been traveling since Sunday on various foundation projects and hasn't had occasion to comment."
    Mr. Vachon said Mr. Soros' "position regarding the Bush administration's policies in Iraq and his criticism thereof have been consistent."
    In his Jan. 26 article, published in more than 20 newspapers, including the Toronto Globe and Mail, Mr. Soros said he agrees with Mr. Bush's goal to spread democracy around the world, "and [I] have devoted the past 15 years and several billion dollars of my fortune to attaining it," but accused the president of "Orwellian doublespeak."
    "Mr. Bush is right to assert that repressive regimes can no longer hide behind a cloak of sovereignty," wrote Mr. Soros, 74, who made his fortune as an international currency trader. "But intervention in other states' internal affairs must be legitimate."
    There has been no comment since the Iraq elections from Mr. Moore, the Academy Award-winning filmmaker who characterized the Iraqi insurgents as "Minutemen," and predicted "they will win."
    The last posting from Mr. Moore on his Web site (www.michaelmoore.com) is dated Jan. 10 and concerns "Fahrenheit 9/11" being named best dramatic movie in the People's Choice Awards. An e-mail to Mr. Moore requesting comment was not returned.
    On the day before the elections, Mr. Moore featured a link to a column in the New York Times with the headline, "A Sinking Sensation of Parallels between Iraq and Vietnam." On the day after the elections, Mr. Moore linked to a story in the left-wing Nation magazine titled "Occupation Thwarts Democracy."
    Moorewatch.com, a site dedicated to countering the filmmaker's political statements, knocked Mr. Moore for "failing to acknowledge [the Iraqi people's] achievement."
    "I find it telling that the man who has lamented such great concern for the kite-flying, tea-sipping Iraqi people featured in 'Fahrenheit 9/11' can't be bothered to string together a few words of admiration for those same people who braved the threat of death to cast their votes this past weekend," the anti-Moore Web site said. "It seems Moore only admires the Iraqi people when they validate his agenda of hating George Bush."
    Some administration critics, however, saw the Iraqi elections as reason to revise their opinion of Mr. Bush.
    Chicago Sun-Times columnist Mark Brown, who has consistently opposed Mr. Bush and the war in Iraq, wrote for yesterday's edition that "it's hard to swallow," but "what if it turns out Bush was right, and we were wrong?"
    The Chicago columnist wrote that he was struck by "television coverage from Iraq that showed long lines of people risking their lives by turning out to vote, honest looks of joy on so many of their faces."
    "If it turns out Bush was right all along, this is going to require some serious penance," Mr. Brown wrote.
    http://www.washingtontimes.com/funct...2-123527-1015r
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  2. 83 Comments

  3. by   Spidey's mom
    I was fascinated by the coverage of the election and stayed up to watch most of it . . . the joy on the faces of the people, the singing and dancing, the women, all the women who turned out. The Iraqi people kept saying they wanted to show the terrorists they weren't afraid. It was truly remarkable.

    Not that all the troubles are over - it takes time to learn Democracy.

    I did mention on a previous thread that I noticed the "talking heads" on CNN were trying to find a downside as they asked questions of their reporters on scene and they kept having to deal with joy. Weird that they would prefer the election would have failed. Sad too.

    The story about the terrorists using a disabled man to be a suicide bomber points to further proof (like we need it) that these people are evil and need to be stopped.

    steph
  4. by   Roy Fokker
    Quote from stevielynn
    The story about the terrorists using a disabled man to be a suicide bomber points to further proof (like we need it) that these people are evil and need to be stopped.

    steph
    No disable "man". It was a child... OOooh! Still burns me up! :angryfire
  5. by   Tweety
    I'm a naysayer. I was very moved by the election and democracy in Iraq. To me it still wasn't worth all those American lives and billions of our tax dollars. But I do wish them well and hope for the best and am happy it's a success so far.

    As a naysayer, I honestly wanted success, for the sake of our troops lives and their families.
    Last edit by Tweety on Feb 2, '05
  6. by   Tweety
    Quote from stevielynn

    The story about the terrorists using a disabled man to be a suicide bomber points to further proof (like we need it) that these people are evil and need to be stopped.

    steph
    They are at war. They get guaranteed passage into heaven, and martyrdom and their family gets a lot of respect. We can't stop them.
  7. by   SharonH, RN
    I'm quite honestly surprised; some people never learn. Every time there is an "event" in Iraq, Mr. Bush's people emerge gloating and saying "A-ha! What about that liberals?" Then we hear stuff like the silence from the left is deafening, etc. Don't you ever learn?


    It happened after the initial invasion of Iraq and the destruction of Saddam's statue(turned out to be staged)


    It happened after the initial victories against Saddam's forces(battles still raging)


    It happened after Bush declared Mission Accomplished(the mission changes weekly but clearly we are not finished in Iraq)


    It happened after the deaths of Saddam's sons and after his capture(the insurgency grew stronger)

    It happened at least a dozen times when reports came out claiming that WMDs were found(of course they never were)


    It's too soon to declare any huge success. And it is far, far too complicated to think that everything will be solved by one election. You'd think people would have learned that by now.
  8. by   BeachNurse
    Quote from SharonH, RN
    I'm quite honestly surprised; some people never learn. Every time there is an "event" in Iraq, Mr. Bush's people emerge gloating and saying "A-ha! What about that liberals?" Then we hear stuff like the silence from the left is deafening, etc. Don't you ever learn?


    It happened after the initial invasion of Iraq and the destruction of Saddam's statue(turned out to be staged)


    It happened after the initial victories against Saddam's forces(battles still raging)


    It happened after Bush declared Mission Accomplished(the mission changes weekly but clearly we are not finished in Iraq)


    It happened after the deaths of Saddam's sons and after his capture(the insurgency grew stronger)

    It happened at least a dozen times when reports came out claiming that WMDs were found(of course they never were)


    It's too soon to declare any huge success. And it is far, far too complicated to think that everything will be solved by one election. You'd think people would have learned that by now.
    As long as something is accomplished by this President, whether it be free elections or the eventual eradication of most of the violence, it will never be right and will never be enough in the minds of the "liberals". And when has there been any gloating? The liberal media seems to gloat about every tiny negative detail. They "gloat" about beheadings..gloat about every life lost, even if the body count includes terrorist insurgents. The liberals are just upset because they can't GLOAT ABOUT A FAILED IRAQI ELECTION.
    Last edit by BeachNurse on Feb 2, '05
  9. by   SharonH, RN
    Quote from BeachNurse
    As long as something is accomplished by this President, whether it be free elections or the eventual eradication of most of the violence, it will never be right and will never be enough in the minds of the "liberals". And when has there been any gloating? The liberal media seems to gloat about every tiny negative detail. They "gloat" about beheadings..gloat about every life lost, even if the body count includes terrorist insurgents. The liberals are just upset because they can't GLOAT ABOUT A FAILED IRAQI ELECTION.

    When has there ever been gloating? Sheesh Beachnurse, do you pay attention? There isn't enough time to bring up all the editorials and posts that gloat every time something happens over there.


    Liberals are upset because the elections didn't fail? WHAT A DISGUSTING THING TO SAY.
  10. by   BeachNurse
    Quote from SharonH, RN
    When has there ever been gloating? Sheesh Beachnurse, do you pay attention? There isn't enough time to bring up all the editorials and posts that gloat every time something happens over there.


    Liberals are upset because the elections didn't fail? WHAT A DISGUSTING THING TO SAY.
    I think it's more than fair to say that most liberal media pundits and most liberal co-workers and friends of mine are fairly disappointed that things went so well. They sure aren't saying otherwise.
  11. by   SharonH, RN
    Quote from BeachNurse
    I think it's more than fair to say that most liberal media pundits and most liberal co-workers and friends of mine are fairly disappointed that things went so well. They sure aren't saying otherwise.

    Okay. Look, I was just trying to help. Nanny-nanny boo boo is fraught with danger! I thought I would just remind you of that.


    There was a victory there, enjoy it! I know I am because the sooner Iraq is stable and doing well, the sooner my loved ones can come home safe and sound and stay home so the idea that I am disappointed is bull.


    Don't worry about what we liberals do. I know victory is sweeter when the other side eats humble pie but in life, we cannot alway have what we want.
  12. by   BeachNurse
    Quote from SharonH, RN
    Okay. Look, I was just trying to help. Nanny-nanny boo boo is fraught with danger! I thought I would just remind you of that.


    There was a victory there, enjoy it! I know I am because the sooner Iraq is stable and doing well, the sooner my loved ones can come home safe and sound and stay home so the idea that I am disappointed is bull.


    Don't worry about what we liberals do. I know victory is sweeter when the other side eats humble pie but in life, we cannot alway have what we want.
    Well I didn't mean for this to get ugly. It was an observation I was making. I am a minority as a conservative where I work, and I think that SOME people (not all) would rather be right than to admit something has gone well over there. I would think that liberals would be happy that an oppressed people have finally been able to vote freely. This is history in the making, regardless of whether you support Bush or not. Iraqi's defied the terrorists and went anyway, with at least a 60% turnout, while the media played up what a bad idea the election was and that turnout would be very low.

    It's not nanny nanny boo boo either. It's just unimaginable to me that SOME people would rather not admit that a good thing has happened. WE aren't saying that everything is fine in Iraq either.
  13. by   SmilingBluEyes
    Quote from SharonH, RN
    I'm quite honestly surprised; some people never learn. Every time there is an "event" in Iraq, Mr. Bush's people emerge gloating and saying "A-ha! What about that liberals?" Then we hear stuff like the silence from the left is deafening, etc. Don't you ever learn?


    It happened after the initial invasion of Iraq and the destruction of Saddam's statue(turned out to be staged)


    It happened after the initial victories against Saddam's forces(battles still raging)


    It happened after Bush declared Mission Accomplished(the mission changes weekly but clearly we are not finished in Iraq)


    It happened after the deaths of Saddam's sons and after his capture(the insurgency grew stronger)

    It happened at least a dozen times when reports came out claiming that WMDs were found(of course they never were)


    It's too soon to declare any huge success. And it is far, far too complicated to think that everything will be solved by one election. You'd think people would have learned that by now.

    YOU SAID IT...all this "neener neener" is immature and PREmature, if you ask me. I wish the Iraqis well, and nothing but success, but folks, there is hell of a long way to go. And many of the neener neener people did NOT lose someone over there, I would bet. I doubt Rush, Bush , Cheney, Rice et. al, sacrificed a single family member for this "success". And just where will we "spread democracy" next? How about in AFRICA?
    Last edit by SmilingBluEyes on Feb 2, '05
  14. by   SmilingBluEyes
    Quote from BeachNurse
    Well I didn't mean for this to get ugly. It was an observation I was making. I am a minority as a conservative where I work, and I think that SOME people (not all) would rather be right than to admit something has gone well over there. I would think that liberals would be happy that an oppressed people have finally been able to vote freely. This is history in the making, regardless of whether you support Bush or not. Iraqi's defied the terrorists and went anyway, with at least a 60% turnout, while the media played up what a bad idea the election was and that turnout would be very low.

    It's not nanny nanny boo boo either. It's just unimaginable to me that SOME people would rather not admit that a good thing has happened. WE aren't saying that everything is fine in Iraq either.
    We are. I am glad the elections took place. Truth be told, it made me almost cry to see this. But I wonder at what cost? And how long before "peace" reigns over there? How many more American lives must be lost in securing the place over the next 5 or 10 years? Those are questions I can't help but ask myself, over and over, being ensconced in military life. Call me selfish, I guess.

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