Muslim cab drivers and passengers with alcohol

  1. http://www.cnn.com/2007/US/01/25/opp...ies/index.html

    Is it realistic for them to have jobs as cab drivers if this is their feeling?
    Last edit by mercyteapot on Jan 26, '07
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  2. 27 Comments

  3. by   Soup Turtle
    Ummm...I got linked to an article about sex offenders.
  4. by   TheCommuter
    Yep, I was also linked to the sex offender article..... ;(
  5. by   mercyteapot
    Sorry about that. I fixed the link. (I hope)
  6. by   TheCommuter
    This reminds me of the story of a Los Angeles city bus driver who was a devout vegetarian. His supervisor required that he display some flyers at the front of the bus that advertised a local fast-food place. The supervisor also asked that the bus driver offer coupons for free hamburgers to all bus patrons who were willing to accept them.

    The bus driver refused, stating that it would be a conflict of interest since he is a vegetarian. The bus driver was promptly terminated from his place of employment.

    These taxi drivers need to realize that their values and beliefs will surely clash with those of the dominant culture. I know this is simplistic, but these drivers need to find another occupation they are going to refuse service to law-abiding citizens who happen to possess unopened bottles of wine.
  7. by   pickledpepperRN
    I think there is a difference. The bus driver was not hired to promote a fast food company. He did not refuse to drive the bus. He even accepted the flyer display, he just wouldn't hand the to bus riders.

    if there a other taxicabs I think it is OK for those drivers to lose business.
    If they are the only convenient ride for any passenger that they should lose their license.
  8. by   Roy Fokker
    "Note: A lesson to be learned from all this - you can have a personal preference or belief --- so long as it doesn't clash with the "established majority". The minute you are found 'violating' the 'esteemed principles' of the 'esteemed majority' you shall and will be penalised".


    So much for "freedom" and "liberty".

    We don't blink twice when it comes to forcing others to conform to our beliefs - to hell with whatever it is that they believe in... after all, they are the "minority" and must hence, 'conform' to our beliefs, right?

    I realise I'm making a pointless argument to some of you folks - property rights don't mean anything to you.

    After "healthcare", please go ahead and add "taxi service" as your "fundamental right and priviledge".


    cheers,
    Last edit by Roy Fokker on Jan 26, '07
  9. by   mercyteapot
    Quote from Roy Fokker
    "Note: A lesson to be learned from all this - you can have a personal preference or belief --- so long as it doesn't clash with the "established majority". The minute you are found 'violating' the 'esteemed principles' of the 'esteemed majority' you shall and will be penalised".


    So much for "freedom" and "liberty".

    We don't blink twice when it comes to forcing others to conform to our beliefs - to hell with whatever it is that they believe in... after all, they are the "minority" and must hence, 'conform' to our beliefs, right?

    I realise I'm making a pointless argument to some of you folks - property rights don't mean anything to you.

    After "healthcare", please go ahead and add "taxi service" as your "fundamental right and priviledge".


    cheers,
    Taxi drivers are licensed by the state. That license is a privilege. They're lucky the state of Minnesota isn't taking it away to drivers who deny to transport passengers.
  10. by   Spidey's mom
    Quote from Roy Fokker
    "Note: A lesson to be learned from all this - you can have a personal preference or belief --- so long as it doesn't clash with the "established majority". The minute you are found 'violating' the 'esteemed principles' of the 'esteemed majority' you shall and will be penalised".


    So much for "freedom" and "liberty".

    We don't blink twice when it comes to forcing others to conform to our beliefs - to hell with whatever it is that they believe in... after all, they are the "minority" and must hence, 'conform' to our beliefs, right?

    I realise I'm making a pointless argument to some of you folks - property rights don't mean anything to you.

    After "healthcare", please go ahead and add "taxi service" as your "fundamental right and priviledge".


    cheers,
    I applaud folks who are true to their beliefs.

    "I would leave my job, instead of doing something that's not allowed in my religion," he said.

    These are independant drivers - right? Not employed by someone else. If so, then they have the right to refuse service to anyone . . a sign that is hung up in most restaurants. Also, "No Shirt, No Shoes, No Service".

    I don't see a problem with having "distinctive lights" on the cabs to let folks know which ones don't allow alcohol.

    I think Americans need to open up their minds a bit . . . . .and see the hypocrisy . . . . next time I walk into a restaurant with the above sign, I'm by Gosh I'm gonna take off my shoes and my shirt and they'd darn well better serve me . . . .

    steph
  11. by   mercyteapot
    Quote from stevielynn
    I applaud folks who are true to their beliefs.

    "I would leave my job, instead of doing something that's not allowed in my religion," he said.

    These are independant drivers - right? Not employed by someone else. If so, then they have the right to refuse service to anyone . . a sign that is hung up in most restaurants. Also, "No Shirt, No Shoes, No Service".

    I don't see a problem with having "distinctive lights" on the cabs to let folks know which ones don't allow alcohol.

    I think Americans need to open up their minds a bit . . . . .and see the hypocrisy . . . . next time I walk into a restaurant with the above sign, I'm by Gosh I'm gonna take off my shoes and my shirt and they'd darn well better serve me . . . .

    steph
    Taxicabs are considered public utilities. The drivers have to abide by special rules instituted by each state. Here in California, those rules are even stricter for drivers who want to operate at the airport. This isn't a free for all. If they don't like the rules, that is certainly their perogative. Their right to practice their religion is not being impeded by expecting them to go to the back of the line. They're not doing anyone special favors here. There is lots of competition for airport permits.
    Last edit by mercyteapot on Jan 26, '07
  12. by   Roy Fokker
    Quote from stevielynn
    I applaud folks who are true to their beliefs.

    "I would leave my job, instead of doing something that's not allowed in my religion," he said.
    Steph,

    You got it all wrong.

    Your license is a privilege granted to you by the all-powerful State. You better toe the line - else your 'privilege' to eke out a living and feed your family will be revoked --- and then you can starve or go on government welfare (which is where the State wants you anyway... but that's a different thread).

    You better get with the program - my necessities triumph over you rights. After all, it is the State which gives you your "rights".


    cheers,
    a very tired Roy who needs to go to work
  13. by   mercyteapot
    Quote from Roy Fokker
    Steph,

    You got it all wrong.

    Your license is a privilege granted to you by the all-powerful State. You better toe the line - else your 'privilege' to eke out a living and feed your family will be revoked --- and then you can starve or go on government welfare (which is where the State wants you anyway... but that's a different thread).

    You better get with the program - my necessities triumph over you rights. After all, it is the State which gives you your "rights".


    cheers,
    a very tired Roy who needs to go to work
    I in no way wish to stomp on anyone's right to practice their religion. But I also do not wish for the practice of their religion to impede the safe and orderly traffic flow in and out of the airport, the comfort of knowing I can take a cab in a strange city and not fear for my life or that I'm going to be recognized as a clueless tourist and charged $50 for a 2 mile ride. Where in the Constitution does it say that freedom to practice your religion equates with freedom to benefit from an airport operating permit without following any of the airport operating rules? No one is saying they have to drive airport routes. No one is saying they have to drive a cab. All that's being said is ''if this fare interferes with the practice of your religious belief, the person that needs to be inconvenienced is yourself, not the passenger''. Perfectly logical, really.
  14. by   Soup Turtle
    If the cabs were marked somehow letting travelers know the rule, I think it would be OK. Of course, I'm hoping the drinkers will opt not to take the "no drinking" cabs when they DON'T have alcohol with them.

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