Musings on a Half-Century of Living

  1. Well, the actual half-century mark is still just over a year away for me, but here are a few life lessons I thought I'd share. I learned them the hard way; perhaps by offering them for public perusal, I might help smooth the pathway for someone else.


    I've learned that wisdom is a lot like humility: once you think you have it, you've lost it.

    I've learned that not every emotion deserves to be named, nor be expressed. Shutting up and just dealing with a problem is highly underrated.

    I've learned that God must really love me a lot.........I've given Him grief all my life by being impulsive, judgmental, angry, intemperate, and generally a great big PITA, and yet He's blessed me with every happiness I could have ever dreamed of, and then some.

    I've learned that being thankful for what you have is a lot easier than always wanting more.

    I've learned that the world doesn't owe us anything---not food, not clothing, not housing, not even an existence---just because we are born and take up space. The earlier in life we get used to that, the less disappointed and the more grateful we will be for what we do receive.

    I've learned that the love of family and friends, and the respect of our fellow human beings, are the highest honors this life has to offer.

    I've learned that contentment and happiness are two different things. People can own the biggest house on the block, hold a Harvard degree, have a perfect body, or accomplish a great many things that make them happy; but no one who keeps making the same mistakes over and over again, or is not at home with oneself, can truly be content.

    I've learned that life's most important lessons come out of sorrow..........that if we fail to accept the experience of pain, we won't recognize what a privilege it is to have joy touch our lives again.

    I've learned that finding one's true calling is not easy........but once you've done it, work stops being something you HAVE to do, and becomes just another wonderful part of a rich and interesting life.

    And I've learned that there is no better feeling on earth than when someone says, "You have made a difference in my life".
    Last edit by VivaLasViejas on Nov 3, '07
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  2. 7 Comments

  3. by   Joe NightingMale
    Great post.

    These are the kind of things you realize as you age; it's kind of like climbing a hill.

    When you're young you're at the base, sometimes running through fields, sometimes struggling through forest. But as you get older, you get closer to the top. And from that vantage point you can better see not only the road ahead but also appreciate where you've come from and how far you've traveled.
  4. by   VivaLasViejas
    Yep........it's just like the saying goes, "'Over the hill' means only that the hardest part of the climb is over, and the view is breathtaking!"
  5. by   CHATSDALE
    first half century teaches us all we need to know for the next half century
  6. by   Spidey's mom
    I was in Vietnam when I turned 50 . . . . . and forgot to take my airline tickets out of my suitcase, which had gone ahead of us by truck instead of paying extra $$$ for the plane. And I had to buy my tickets (the same seats) all over again. And I lost my VISA shortly thereafter and had to cut short my work in the clinics by two days, leave behind my daughter and take a train for 9 hours to Saigon (with a kind Vietnamese/American pharmacist) to stand in the immigration police station praying for a kind clerk to help me out.

    Turning 50 - my brain turned to mush.

    steph
  7. by   VivaLasViejas
    Aw, Steph.........your brain hasn't turned to mush, even though it surely feels like it.

    I was that way for years during my perimenopause. I felt like I was in a perpetual mind-fog---I couldn't remember much of anything, it seemed. I'd forget my kids' school events, things I'd told people (leading to MUCH embarrassment when I repeated the same stories over and over), even really important things like doctor appointments and bills. Now that I'm through 'the change', however, my brain is firing on all eight cylinders again.

    For the most part, anyway---now where did I put my sticky notes?? LOL
    Last edit by VivaLasViejas on Nov 5, '07
  8. by   Spidey's mom
    Quote from mjlrn97
    Aw, Steph.........your brain hasn't turned to mush, even though it surely feels like it.

    I was that way for years during my perimenopause. I felt like I was in a perpetual mind-fog---I couldn't remember much of anything, it seemed. I'd forget my kids' school events, things I'd told people (leading to MUCH embarrassment when I repeated the same stories over and over), even really important things like doctor appointments and bills. Now that I'm through 'the change', however, my brain is firing on all eight cylinders again.

    For the most part, anyway---now where did I put my sticky notes?? LOL
    That is exactly where I am right now.


    steph
  9. by   VivaLasViejas
    Quote from stevielynn
    That is exactly where I am right now.


    steph

    It gets better, darlin'---I promise!!

    I just keep thinking how fortunate I am to be done with all of that........I went through h#!! for almost 10 years, with horrendously heavy bleeding for weeks at a time, mood swings, migraines, hot flashes, the whole works. Then, miraculously, things dwindled to almost nothing, until my periods finally stopped about a year and a half ago. WHile there's a downside to everything (um, what's a libido??), I love the freedom of never having to carry feminine products or worry about being 'late', and I REALLY enjoy not being a hostage to my body's erratic rhythms. THis is like being a kid again---only better!!

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