Martha Stewart's Fall From Grace

  1. Well, by now the news has probably reached every corner of the globe: the notorious doyenne of Gracious Living has been found guilty of all four of the remaining charges against her.

    I'm no Martha fan, but to be absolutely honest, I don't think anything she did---as I understand it---was criminal. Selfish, maybe, but if all the powerful people who acted in their own best interests were convicted of that, the prisons would all be filled with politicians, businessmen, actors, lawyers, and other upper-crust elitist types.

    In fact, I think she was prosecuted as much for who and what she is, as what she supposedly did: she's a wealthy, fabulously talented and powerful woman who, by most accounts, is a real b****. The woman may be able to put on the ultimate dinner party for 12, but are there 12 people in the entire country who'd want to eat with her?

    However, I don't think she'll ever see the inside of a prison cell......they'll probably just sock it to her where it hurts, namely her pocketbook. I can imagine her having to pay a few million bucks in fines, and maybe getting a suspended prison sentence, but not actually doing time.

    So, what do you all think will happen to Martha? It's hard NOT to enjoy a few malicious snickers at her plight.....behold, the judgmental queen b**** of domestic frivolity, deposed from her high and mighty throne! But does she really deserve prison for "crimes" that have been committed by countless other tycoon types who, it must be noted, are usually MEN?

    You be the judge!
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  2. 35 Comments

  3. by   NurseHardee
    But profittiing (while others take the loss) via insider tips is a form of robbery, and is correctly considered a criminal act. Certainly though, 'white collar crime' is not normally proscuted in the US, but rather is usually held up as shrewness and good business acumen.

    Nurse Hardee
    ----------------------------------------------------------

    Quote from mjlrn97
    Well, by now the news has probably reached every corner of the globe: the notorious doyenne of Gracious Living has been found guilty of all four of the remaining charges against her.

    I'm no Martha fan, but to be absolutely honest, I don't think anything she did---as I understand it---was criminal. Selfish, maybe, but if all the powerful people who acted in their own best interests were convicted of that, the prisons would all be filled with politicians, businessmen, actors, lawyers, and other upper-crust elitist types.

    In fact, I think she was prosecuted as much for who and what she is, as what she supposedly did: she's a wealthy, fabulously talented and powerful woman who, by most accounts, is a real b****. The woman may be able to put on the ultimate dinner party for 12, but are there 12 people in the entire country who'd want to eat with her?

    However, I don't think she'll ever see the inside of a prison cell......they'll probably just sock it to her where it hurts, namely her pocketbook. I can imagine her having to pay a few million bucks in fines, and maybe getting a suspended prison sentence, but not actually doing time.

    So, what do you all think will happen to Martha? It's hard NOT to enjoy a few malicious snickers at her plight.....behold, the judgmental queen b**** of domestic frivolity, deposed from her high and mighty throne! But does she really deserve prison for "crimes" that have been committed by countless other tycoon types who, it must be noted, are usually MEN?

    You be the judge!
  4. by   Tweety
    She's going to have the most fabulous looking jail cell in town.
  5. by   Sheri257
    Quote from mjlrn97
    I'm no Martha fan, but to be absolutely honest, I don't think anything she did---as I understand it---was criminal. Selfish, maybe, but if all the powerful people who acted in their own best interests were convicted of that, the prisons would all be filled with politicians, businessmen, actors, lawyers, and other upper-crust elitist types.
    And the problem with that is, what? If they do something wrong, they should go to jail. Or, are we supposed to bend the rules for the elite?

    It's always amazing to see how lying, which basically amounted to perjury in this case, is the accepted norm in our society. It's ok to lie as long as you're rich and you saved yourself a few bucks. I'm always amazed to see how people make excuses for the rich in this country.

    Martha's problem was Martha. Nothing else. I read a biography about her, and this woman has always lied, cheated and stole her way to the top. She basically made her fortune by stealing the work of others, and there is a long documented history of this.

    She also has poor judgement. The whole expensive purse thing was a huge misstep. And she was wearing fur on the day of her conviction. I mean, really, you know the lawyers told her not to do that. It was incredibly stupid.

    But the bottom line is this. Even some of the the greatest critics of the case, who actually sat through the proceedings, say the government put on an excellent case. In the end, even the skeptics were convinced.

    Martha got what she deserved.
    Last edit by Sheri257 on Mar 7, '04
  6. by   nurseygrrl
    Quote from 3rdShiftGuy
    She's going to have the most fabulous looking jail cell in town.


    I may be in the minority, but I have always liked Martha Stewart. I find it odd that some people get in trouble, while others get off...namely O.J. Simpson, The Clintons, Martha, P. Diddy...why are some lucky and some not?

    Secondly, I pose a question to you all. If you had a few dollars in the stock market and your broker gave you inside info...would you sell? I sure would! I mean, who would leave their money in knowing they were going to lose it? This, to me, is not a crime. I feel the broker committed a crime, but not Martha.
  7. by   Sheri257
    Quote from HerEyes73
    Secondly, I pose a question to you all. If you had a few dollars in the stock market and your broker gave you inside info...would you sell? I sure would! I mean, who would leave their money in knowing they were going to lose it? This, to me, is not a crime. I feel the broker committed a crime, but not Martha.
    This is brilliant. You just admitted you would willingly commit a federal crime.

    The point is, you would never get that information. Just as millions of investors never got that information during the stock market crash.

    Insider information is illegal because it only benefits a chosen few at the expense of the vast majority of shareholders. This is why it's illegal, and has been illegal for many years.

    Ask millions of retirees, or many other small investors who lost their entire life's savings, about insider information. I'm sure they feel differently than you do.
    Last edit by Sheri257 on Mar 7, '04
  8. by   Godswill
    martha Stewart amazes me with her talent,i think she is awesome, but she seem like a hard person to live or work for, but , why is it that the goverment or after little martha, when they let all the BIG real crooks go that worked for ENRON etc, it burns me up, how backward this seem to me, granted she broke the law, but they m are making way to much of a big deal of it all. If they want to real bring down some crook, the goverment need to look with in, then work outwards :angryfire
  9. by   Havin' A Party!
    No question that what Ms. MS did was totally criminal. And she should (and likely will) be punished accordingly. :stone

    But after her stay at the "Gov's Bed and Breakfast," think she'll still be able to make a less-than-fab come-back. Don't have a prob with this, but she needs to pay the piper first.
  10. by   VivaLasViejas
    I don't disagree that what Martha Stewart did was bad. But tell me, why is she being held to a different standard than, say, Kenneth Lay, or others who profited from the Enron and WorldCom scandals at the expense of their employees? Why aren't they being charged with federal crimes as well? After all, their actions affected far more people than Ms. Stewart's........Again, I didn't say I approved of her behaviors here; but I do wonder why "justice" is so unevenly dealt out, even among the rich and famous. :stone
  11. by   Elenaster
    Quote from mjlrn97
    I don't disagree that what Martha Stewart did was bad. But tell me, why is she being held to a different standard than, say, Kenneth Lay, or others who profited from the Enron and WorldCom scandals at the expense of their employees? Why aren't they being charged with federal crimes as well? After all, their actions affected far more people than Ms. Stewart's........Again, I didn't say I approved of her behaviors here; but I do wonder why "justice" is so unevenly dealt out, even among the rich and famous. :stone
    I couldn't agree more, Marla, and I think that Martha Stewart is a very powerful woman that makes many people very uncomfortable for many reasons. It is my belief that whomever "blew the whistle" on her was acting in a vindictive manner and now she will be made an example of.

    Do I think she's guilty? Yes, but I'd be willing to bet my eye teeth that there are dozens more celebrities, powerful business leaders, and politicians that are guilty of doing the exact same thing and will likely never be found out.

    I also sincerely doubt that the jury was impartial, particularly since they were reported to call her conviction a "victory for the little guy." Nor do I believe the punishment fits the crime....c'mon now, prison???? Fine the heck out of her, make her do tons of community service, whatever, but I really think putting her in prison is excessive. JMHO.
  12. by   jemb
    Quote from mjlrn97
    I don't disagree that what Martha Stewart did was bad. But tell me, why is she being held to a different standard than, say, Kenneth Lay, or others who profited from the Enron and WorldCom scandals at the expense of their employees? Why aren't they being charged with federal crimes as well?
    They are being prosecuted. It has just taken more time for the news to get out.

    One of the WorldCom guys (I forget his name) has gotten ten years and several million dollars in fines. I think most of the rest are still in process.
  13. by   Sheri257
    Quote from Elenaster

    Do I think she's guilty? Yes, but I'd be willing to bet my eye teeth that there are dozens more celebrities, powerful business leaders, and politicians that are guilty of doing the exact same thing and will likely never be found out.

    I also sincerely doubt that the jury was impartial, particularly since they were reported to call her conviction a "victory for the little guy."
    I'm confused. You think she's guilty, but the jury wasn't impartial. Well, if she's guilty, what else is the jury supposed to do but convict? They're not supposed to consider whether other celebrities are guilty of the same thing.

    I saw an interview with the juror in question, who supposedly said it was a 'victory for the little guy.' The interviewer kept trying to pressure him to say that, but the juror's response was that he was misquoted.

    The juror kept saying that they just looked at the evidence, nothing more, but the interviewer kept pressing him to say 'victory for the little guy' instead. The juror consistantly said it had nothing to do with that, over and over again, but the interviewer didn't seem to want to listen to him.

    So I'm starting to think the 'victory for the little guy' report is more media hype then fact.
    Last edit by Sheri257 on Mar 7, '04
  14. by   elkpark
    Several of the analyses of the Stewart case that I've read have made the same point -- that if she had just told the truth in the first place (yes, he called me and told me the stock was going to tank, so I sold it -- oh, golly, was that wrong?), she would probably have not even been prosecuted. What really got her in trouble (and all of us nurses know this like our own names, and live by it, right?? ) was when she tried to falsify the records and lied about the stituation to the investigators. It was the cover-up that did her in.

    And, yes, the Enron and WorldCom guys are getting charged, one by one, and indicted. It just takes a long time to get your ducks in a row and build a tight case in this kind of prosecution.

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