Marine 'I killed innocent people for our government'

  1. http://www.sacbee.com/content/opinio...10241546c.html

    Atrocities in Iraq: 'I killed innocent people for our government'



    By Paul Rockwell -- Special to The Bee - (Published May 16, 2004)

    "We forget what war is about, what it does to those who wage it and those who suffer from it. Those who hate war the most, I have often found, are veterans who know it."



    - Chris Hedges, New York Times reporter and author of "War Is a Force That Gives Us Meaning"


    For nearly 12 years, Staff Sgt. Jimmy Massey was a hard-core, some say gung-ho, Marine. For three years he trained fellow Marines in one of the most grueling indoctrination rituals in military life - Marine boot camp.



    The Iraq war changed Massey. The brutality, the sheer carnage of the U.S. invasion, touched his conscience and transformed him forever. He was honorably discharged with full severance last Dec. 31 and is now back in his hometown, Waynsville, N.C.



    When I talked with Massey last week, he expressed his remorse at the civilian loss of life in incidents in which he himself was involved.



    Q: You spent 12 years in the Marines. When were you sent to Iraq?



    A: I went to Kuwait around Jan. 17. I was in Iraq from the get-go. And I was involved in the initial invasion.



    Q: What does the public need to know about your experiences as a Marine?



    A: The cause of the Iraqi revolt against the American occupation. What they need to know is we killed a lot of innocent people. I think at first the Iraqis had the understanding that casualties are a part of war. But over the course of time, the occupation hurt the Iraqis. And I didn't see any humanitarian support.



    Q: What experiences turned you against the war and made you leave the Marines?



    A: I was in charge of a platoon that consists of machine gunners and missile men. Our job was to go into certain areas of the towns and secure the roadways. There was this one particular incident - and there's many more - the one that really pushed me over the edge. It involved a car with Iraqi civilians. From all the intelligence reports we were getting, the cars were loaded down with suicide bombs or material. That's the rhetoric we received from intelligence. They came upon our checkpoint. We fired some warning shots. They didn't slow down. So we lit them up.



    Q: Lit up? You mean you fired machine guns?



    A: Right. Every car that we lit up we were expecting ammunition to go off. But we never heard any. Well, this particular vehicle we didn't destroy completely, and one gentleman looked up at me and said: "Why did you kill my brother? We didn't do anything wrong." That hit me like a ton of bricks.



    Q: He spoke English?



    A: Oh, yeah.



    Q: Baghdad was being bombed. The civilians were trying to get out, right?



    A: Yes. They received pamphlets, propaganda we dropped on them. It said, "Just throw up your hands, lay down weapons." That's what they were doing, but we were still lighting them up. They weren't in uniform. We never found any weapons.



    Q: You got to see the bodies and casualties?



    A: Yeah, firsthand. I helped throw them in a ditch.



    Q: Over what period did all this take place?



    A: During the invasion of Baghdad.



    'We lit him up pretty good'



    Q: How many times were you involved in checkpoint "light-ups"?



    A: Five times. There was [the city of] Rekha. The gentleman was driving a stolen work utility van. He didn't stop. With us being trigger happy, we didn't really give this guy much of a chance. We lit him up pretty good. Then we inspected the back of the van. We found nothing. No explosives.



    Q: The reports said the cars were loaded with explosives. In all the incidents did you find that to be the case?



    A: Never. Not once. There were no secondary explosions. As a matter of fact, we lit up a rally after we heard a stray gunshot.



    Q: A demonstration? Where?



    A: On the outskirts of Baghdad. Near a military compound. There were demonstrators at the end of the street. They were young and they had no weapons. And when we rolled onto the scene, there was already a tank that was parked on the side of the road. If the Iraqis wanted to do something, they could have blown up the tank. But they didn't. They were only holding a demonstration. Down at the end of the road, we saw some RPGs (rocket-propelled grenades) lined up against the wall. That put us at ease because we thought: "Wow, if they were going to blow us up, they would have done it."



    Q: Were the protest signs in English or Arabic?



    A: Both.



    Q: Who gave the order to wipe the demonstrators out?



    A: Higher command. We were told to be on the lookout for the civilians because a lot of the Fedayeen and the Republican Guards had tossed away uniforms and put on civilian clothes and were mounting terrorist attacks on American soldiers. The intelligence reports that were given to us were basically known by every member of the chain of command. The rank structure that was implemented in Iraq by the chain of command was evident to every Marine in Iraq. The order to shoot the demonstrators, I believe, came from senior government officials, including intelligence communities within the military and the U.S. government.



    Q: What kind of firepower was employed?



    A: M-16s, 50-cal. machine guns.



    Q: You fired into six or ten kids? Were they all taken out?



    A: Oh, yeah. Well, I had a "mercy" on one guy. When we rolled up, he was hiding behind a concrete pillar. I saw him and raised my weapon up, and he put up his hands. He ran off. I told everybody, "Don't shoot." Half of his foot was trailing behind him. So he was running with half of his foot cut off.



    Q: After you lit up the demonstration, how long before the next incident?



    A: Probably about one or two hours. This is another thing, too. I am so glad I am talking with you, because I suppressed all of this.



    Q: Well, I appreciate you giving me the information, as hard as it must be to recall the painful details.



    A: That's all right. It's kind of therapy for me. Because it's something that I had repressed for a long time.



    Q: And the incident?



    A: There was an incident with one of the cars. We shot an individual with his hands up. He got out of the car. He was badly shot. We lit him up. I don't know who started shooting first. One of the Marines came running over to where we were and said: "You all just shot a guy with his hands up." Man, I forgot about this.



    Depleted uranium and cluster bombs



    Q: You mention machine guns. What can you tell me about cluster bombs, or depleted uranium?



    A: Depleted uranium. I know what it does. It's basically like leaving plutonium rods around. I'm 32 years old. I have 80 percent of my lung capacity. I ache all the time. I don't feel like a healthy 32-year-old.



    Q: Were you in the vicinity of of depleted uranium?



    A: Oh, yeah. It's everywhere. DU is everywhere on the battlefield. If you hit a tank, there's dust.



    Q: Did you breath any dust?



    A: Yeah.



    Q: And if DU is affecting you or our troops, it's impacting Iraqi civilians.



    A: Oh, yeah. They got a big wasteland problem.



    Q: Do Marines have any precautions about dealing with DU?



    A: Not that I know of. Well, if a tank gets hit, crews are detained for a little while to make sure there are no signs or symptoms. American tanks have depleted uranium on the sides, and the projectiles have DU in them. If an enemy vehicle gets hit, the area gets contaminated. Dead rounds are in the ground. The civilian populace is just now starting to learn about it. Hell, I didn't even know about DU until two years ago. You know how I found out about it? I read an article in Rolling Stone magazine. I just started inquiring about it, and I said "Holy s---!"



    Q: Cluster bombs are also controversial. U.N. commissions have called for a ban. Were you acquainted with cluster bombs?



    A: I had one of my Marines in my battalion who lost his leg from an ICBM.



    Q: What's an ICBM?



    A: A multi-purpose cluster bomb.



    Q: What happened?



    A: He stepped on it. We didn't get to training about clusters until about a month before I left.



    Q: What kind of training?



    A: They told us what they looked like, and not to step on them.



    Q: Were you in any areas where they were dropped?



    A: Oh, yeah. They were everywhere.



    Q: Dropped from the air?



    A: From the air as well as artillery.



    Q: Are they dropped far away from cities, or inside the cities?



    A: They are used everywhere. Now if you talked to a Marine artillery officer, he would give you the runaround, the politically correct answer. But for an average grunt, they're everywhere.



    Q: Including inside the towns and cities?



    A: Yes, if you were going into a city, you knew there were going to be ICBMs.



    Q: Cluster bombs are anti-personnel weapons. They are not precise. They don't injure buildings, or hurt tanks. Only people and living things. There are a lot of undetonated duds and they go off after the battles are over.



    A: Once the round leaves the tube, the cluster bomb has a mind of its own. There's always human error. I'm going to tell you: The armed forces are in a tight spot over there. It's starting to leak out about the civilian casualties that are taking place. The Iraqis know. I keep hearing reports from my Marine buddies inside that there were 200-something civilians killed in Fallujah. The military is scrambling right now to keep the raps on that. My understanding is Fallujah is just littered with civilian bodies.



    Embedded reporters



    Q: How are the embedded reporters responding?



    A: I had embedded reporters in my unit, not my platoon. One we had was a South African reporter. He was scared s---less. We had an incident where one of them wanted to go home.



    Q: Why?



    A: It was when we started going into Baghdad. When he started seeing the civilian casualties, he started wigging out a little bit. It didn't start until we got on the outskirts of Baghdad and started taking civilian casualties.



    Q: I would like to go back to the first incident, when the survivor asked why did you kill his brother. Was that the incident that pushed you over the edge, as you put it?



    A: Oh, yeah. Later on I found out that was a typical day. I talked with my commanding officer after the incident. He came up to me and says: "Are you OK?" I said: "No, today is not a good day. We killed a bunch of civilians." He goes: "No, today was a good day." And when he said that, I said "Oh, my goodness, what the hell am I into?"



    Q: Your feelings changed during the invasion. What was your state of mind before the invasion?



    A: I was like every other troop. My president told me they got weapons of mass destruction, that Saddam threatened the free world, that he had all this might and could reach us anywhere. I just bought into the whole thing.



    Q: What changed you?



    A: The civilian casualties taking place. That was what made the difference. That was when I changed.



    Q: Did the revelations that the government fabricated the evidence for war affect the troops?



    A: Yes. I killed innocent people for our government. For what? What did I do? Where is the good coming out of it? I feel like I've had a hand in some sort of evil lie at the hands of our government. I just feel embarrassed, ashamed about it.



    Showdown with superiors



    Q: I understand that all the incidents - killing civilians at checkpoints, itchy fingers at the rally - weigh on you. What happened with your commanding officers? How did you deal with them?



    A: There was an incident. It was right after the fall of Baghdad, when we went back down south. On the outskirts of Karbala, we had a morning meeting on the battle plan. I was not in a good mindset. All these things were going through my head - about what we were doing over there. About some of the things my troops were asking. I was holding it all inside. My lieutenant and I got into a conversation. The conversation was striking me wrong. And I lashed out. I looked at him and told him: "You know, I honestly feel that what we're doing is wrong over here. We're committing genocide."



    He asked me something and I said that with the killing of civilians and the depleted uranium we're leaving over here, we're not going to have to worry about terrorists. He didn't like that. He got up and stormed off. And I knew right then and there that my career was over. I was talking to my commanding officer.



    Q: What happened then?



    A: After I talked to the top commander, I was kind of scurried away. I was basically put on house arrest. I didn't talk to other troops. I didn't want to hurt them. I didn't want to jeopardize them.



    I want to help people. I felt strongly about it. I had to say something. When I was sent back to stateside, I went in front of the sergeant major. He's in charge of 3,500-plus Marines. "Sir," I told him, "I don't want your money. I don't want your benefits. What you did was wrong."



    It was just a personal conviction with me. I've had an impeccable career. I chose to get out. And you know who I blame? I blame the president of the U.S. It's not the grunt. I blame the president because he said they had weapons of mass destruction. It was a lie.
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  2. 50 Comments

  3. by   hock1
    What about soldier didn't this guy understand? Soldier = shoot at people and get shot at. Nobody has been drafted. It's a volunteer force. Did he really believe the 'travel and see the world part'? Sorry guess I get crabby when I see stupidity.
  4. by   psychomachia
    Quote from Dr. Gonzo
    http://www.sacbee.com/content/opinio...10241546c.html

    Atrocities in Iraq: 'I killed innocent people for our government'



    By Paul Rockwell -- Special to The Bee - (Published May 16, 2004)


    Q: Cluster bombs are also controversial. U.N. commissions have called for a ban. Were you acquainted with cluster bombs?



    A: I had one of my Marines in my battalion who lost his leg from an ICBM.



    Q: What's an ICBM?



    A: A multi-purpose cluster bomb.



    .
    What?? An "ICBM" is an Intercontinental Ballistic Missle. You'd lose your leg and a few square miles of earth it was standing on...
  5. by   roxannekkb
    Quote from vhope
    What about soldier didn't this guy understand? Soldier = shoot at people and get shot at. Nobody has been drafted. It's a volunteer force. Did he really believe the 'travel and see the world part'? Sorry guess I get crabby when I see stupidity.
    I suppose he thought that he would be defending our nation, not sent on a pre-emptive attack to a third world country that posed no threat to anyone. I think that's the problem, that the Iraqis are not our "enemy" in that they did not begin this war. And maybe some of our soldiers have a problem being with that--they are in a foreign country killing people for no apparent reason, other than maintaining an unwanted occupation.
  6. by   Q.
    Quote from psychomachia
    What?? An "ICBM" is an Intercontinental Ballistic Missle. You'd lose your leg and a few square miles of earth it was standing on...

    Yes!
    This "interview" reminds me of the Ollie North email that went around about his warning of Osama bin Laden. :chuckle
  7. by   Q.
    Quote from roxannekkb
    I suppose he thought that he would be defending our nation, not sent on a pre-emptive attack to a third world country that posed no threat to anyone.
    No threat to anyone.....?
  8. by   pickledpepperRN
    Quote from Susy K
    Yes!
    This "interview" reminds me of the Ollie North email that went around about his warning of Osama bin Laden. :chuckle
    First a link in response to what I (perhaps wrongly) perceived as doubt.
    I subscribe to the Sacramento Bee. I called and was told the story was picked up be Salon.com with photos of Staff Sgt. Jimmy Massey and one he took. He IS real. Some nurses who work at a Sacto area hospital remember when he was in middle school. A local citizen.
    Yes, I winced when reading that he called cluster bombs ICBMs too. Seems that is what the troops in his unit routinely called them.


    http://www.alternet.org/story.html?StoryID=18730
  9. by   hock1
    Quote from roxannekkb
    I suppose he thought that he would be defending our nation, not sent on a pre-emptive attack to a third world country that posed no threat to anyone. I think that's the problem, that the Iraqis are not our "enemy" in that they did not begin this war. And maybe some of our soldiers have a problem being with that--they are in a foreign country killing people for no apparent reason, other than maintaining an unwanted occupation.
    My point exactly!!! How did he really expect to defend the country? When the USA defeated Germany, we stayed there for many years...many, many years. In fact, our soldiers are still there. The war has been over for how many years? When did people start to believe war meant finshed within a year and no deaths on either side? My father (too German to be in active service) and my father-in-law (who roamed the streets of Hiroshima and was dx with POISON IVY for years afterwards) both are WWII vets and both made sure their children understood the sacrafice as well as the responsibility of military service. The military should not be joined to 'see the world' or 'use ones words' to work it out. It's a tough, harsh, and sometimes a life time of haunted faces kinda job. It takes special training, and in light of recent events, retraining. Don't get me wrong, I don't support the war. I was quite p*ssed off when Bush did what he did. Should have waited for the UN! Esp since he cryed so hard for other countries to do so! However, I am confused by the soldier who claimed the army didn't tell him he'd be shooting at people. It reminds me of the obese man who tried to bring suit against McDonalds cuz he was fat. Just my opinion.
  10. by   psychomachia
    Quote from vhope
    My point exactly!!! How did he really expect to defend the country?
    AND just what did they think when they say a bunch of RPGs lined up on the wall down the street??? That NO ONE was going to pick one up?? Better to take 'em out before they take you...


    AND if these people are too stupid to drive through a check point after having warning shots fired at them...well....forget about "defending the country" -- you're better off defending your a**!! Is it better to wait until someon gets blown up before assuming that every vehicle that DOESN'T STOP is possibly carrying explosives??

    Here's a reality check for anyone who thinks a checkpoint / vehicle inspection assignment is without risk:

    Pfc. John D. Amos II 22 1st Battalion, 21st Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division (Light) Valparaiso, Indiana Killed when a car bomb exploded at a temporary checkpoint near the Kirkuk Police Academy on April 4, 2004

    Spc. James L. Beckstrand 27 4th Battalion, 27th Field Artillery Regiment, 1st Armored Division Escondido, California Killed when a vehicle approached his unit while it was conducting a dismounted improvised explosive device sweep patrol and the driver detonated a bomb in Baghdad, Iraq, on April 29, 2004

    Staff Sgt. Hesley Box Jr. 24 1st Battalion, 153rd Infantry Regiment, 39th Brigade Combat Team, Arkansas National Guard Nashville, Arkansas Killed when a car bomb detonated near his guard post in Baghdad, Iraq, on May 6, 2004

    Sgt. Thomas F. Broomhead 34 2nd Squadron, 3rd Armored Cavalry Regiment Cannon City, Colorado Killed on guard duty at a checkpoint by unknown assailants who fired on him from a vehicle on May 27, 2003, in Fallujah, Iraq

    Petty Officer 3rd Class Nathan B. Bruckenthal 24 Tactical Law Enforcement Team, South Detachment 403, U.S. Coast Guard Smithtown, New York Bruckenthal died of wounds he received when the small boat his seven-man team boarded exploded near Iraq's Khawr Al Amaya Oil Terminal in the Persian Gulf on April 24, 2004. He is the first Coast Guardsman killed in action since the Vietnam War.

    Pfc. Jesse R. Buryj 21 66th Military Police Company Canton, Ohio Killed when his military vehicle was struck by a dump truck whose driver had been shot while trying to run through a control point in Karbala, Iraq, on May 5, 2004

    Sgt. Ryan M. Campbell 25 4th Battalion, 27th Field Artillery Regiment, 1st Armored Division Kirksville, Missouri Killed when a vehicle approached his unit while it was conducting a dismounted improvised explosive device sweep patrol and the driver detonated a bomb in Baghdad, Iraq, on April 29, 2004
  11. by   psychomachia
    a few more....

    Spc. Jason K. Chappell 22 Company B, 1st Squadron, 9th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division Hemet, California Killed when a vehicle-based improvised explosive device detonated in Khalidiyah, Iraq, on January 24, 2004

    Spc. Andrew F. Chris 25 3rd Battalion, 75th Ranger Regiment California Killed when his vehicle passed by an vehicle loaded with explosives that detonated on June 26, 2003, in southwest Baghdad. Chris was serving on Task Force 20, the special operations unit hunting for Saddam Hussein and other fugitive Iraqi leaders

    Sgt. 1st Class Amporn Chulert 46 Thai Army engineering division Ratchaburi province, Thailand Chulert and another Thai soldier were guarding the Lima Camp entrance when a bomb-laden truck exploded outside the camp in Karbala, Iraq, on December 27, 2003.

    Pfc. Norman Darling 29 4th Battalion, 27th Field Artillery Regiment, 1st Armored Division Middleboro, Massachusetts Killed when a vehicle approached his unit while it was conducting a dismounted improvised explosive device sweep patrol and the driver detonated a bomb in Baghdad, Iraq, on April 29, 2004

    Staff Sgt. Jeffrey F. Dayton 27 4th Battalion, 27th Field Artillery Regiment, 1st Armored Division Caledonia, Mississippi Killed when a vehicle approached his unit while it was conducting a dismounted improvised explosive device sweep patrol and the driver detonated a bomb in Baghdad, Iraq, on April 29, 2004

    Pfc. Michael R. Deuel 21 2nd Battalion, 325th Infantry Regiment, 82nd Airborne Division Nemo, South Dakota Killed in a drive-by attack while on guard duty at a propane distribution center in Baghdad, Iraq, on June 18, 2003

    Sgt. Michael E. Dooley 23 1st Squadron, 3rd Armored Cavalry Regiment Pulaski, Virginia He was manning a checkpoint in Al Asad, Iraq, on June 8, 2003, when a vehicle approached and two people got out requesting a medic for a sick friend. Immediately following the request for help, they opened fire, killing Dooley

    Pfc. Jeremy Ricardo Ewing 22 4th Battalion, 27th Field Artillery Regiment, 1st Armored Division Miami, Florida Killed when a vehicle approached his unit while it was conducting a dismounted improvised explosive device sweep patrol and the driver detonated a bomb in Baghdad, Iraq, on April 29, 2004

    Pvt. Jonathan I. Falaniko 20 70th Engineer Battalion, 3rd Brigade, 1st Armored Division Pago Pago, American Samoa Killed when a vehicle containing an improvised explosive device detonated near the Al Khadra Police Station in downtown Baghdad on October 27, 2003

    Pvt. Robert L. Frantz 19 1st Battalion, 36th Infantry Regiment, 1st Armored Division San Antonio, Texas Killed when a grenade thrown by a local resident exploded near him while on guard duty in Baghdad, Iraq, on June 17, 2003

    Cpl. Jesus A. Gonzalez 22 1st Tank Battalion, 1st Marine Division Indio, California Killed while manning a checkpoint in Baghdad on April 12, 2003

    Sgt. Michael S. Hancock 29 1st Battalion, 320th Field Artillery Regiment, 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault) Yreka, California Killed when he was shot while on guard duty in Mosul, Iraq, on October 24, 2003

    Sgt. James W. Harlan 44 660th Transportation Company, 88th Regional Readiness Command, Army Reserve Owensboro, Kentucky Killed when a suicide bomber detonated a car bomb next to his vehicle at Camp Anaconda near Balad, Iraq, on May 14, 2004

    Sgt. Atanacio Haro Marin 27 Battery C, 3rd Battalion, 16th Field Artillery Regiment, 4th Infantry Division Baldwin Park, California Killed when the checkpoint his unit was manning south of Balad, Iraq, came under fire on June 3, 2003

    Staff Sgt. Terry W. Hemingway 39 1st Battalion, 15th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Brigade, 3rd Infantry Division Willingboro, New Jersey Killed when a car exploded next to his Bradley Fighting Vehicle in Baghdad, Iraq, on April 10, 2003

    Fern L. Holland 33 Department of the Army civilian assigned to the Coalition Provisional Authority N/A Holland, a lawyer, was killed when gunmen posing as Iraqi police officers stopped her vehicle at a makeshift checkpoint near Hillah, Iraq, on March 9, 2004.

    Spc. Simeon Hunte 23 1st Battalion, 13th Armored Regiment, 3rd Brigade, 1st Armored Division Essex, New Jersey Killed when an Iraqi citizen approached and shot him while he was on patrol in Al Khadra, Iraq, on October 1, 2003

    Sgt. 1st Class Ivan Indzhov Jr. 36 1st Bulgarian Infantry Battalion Ustrem, Bulgaria Killed when a car bomb exploded in the Bulgarian Army camp in Karbala, Iraq, on December 27, 2003

    Capt. Georgi Kachorin 29 1st Bulgarian Infantry Battalion Razlog, Bulgaria Killed when a car bomb exploded in the Bulgarian Army camp in Karbala, Iraq, on December 27, 2003

    Pvt. Svilen Kirov 25 1st Bulgarian Infantry Battalion Dobrich, Bulgaria Killed when a car bomb exploded in the Bulgarian Army camp in Karbala, Iraq, on December 27, 2003

    Sgt. 1st Class Mitr Klaharn 43 Thai Army engineering division Pattalung province, Thailand Klaharn and another Thai soldier were guarding the Lima Camp entrance when a bomb-laden truck exploded outside the camp in Karbala, Iraq, on December 27, 2003.

    Spc. Joshua L. Knowles 23 1133rd Transportation Company, Iowa National Guard Sheffield, Iowa Killed when he was hit by a mortar round at a Baghdad International Airport checkpoint on February 5, 2004

    Pfc. Luis A. Moreno 19 Battery A, 4th Battalion, 1st Field Artillery Regiment. 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 1st Armored Division Bronx, New York Moreno was shot on January 23, 2004, while guarding a gas station in Baghdad, Iraq. He was evacuated to Lakenheath Medical Treatment Facility in England, where he died on his injuries on January 29, 2004.

    Pfc. Ricky A. Morris Jr. 20 3rd Battalion, 7th Marine Regiment, 1st Marine Division, 1st Marine Expeditionary Force Lubbock, Texas Killed in action while conducting security and stability operations in Al Anbar province in northern Iraq on March 18, 2004

    Staff Sgt. Esau G. Patterson Jr. 25 4th Battalion, 27th Field Artillery Regiment, 1st Armored Division Ridgeland, South Carolina Killed when a vehicle approached his unit while it was conducting a dismounted improvised explosive device sweep patrol and the driver detonated a bomb in Baghdad, Iraq, on April 29, 2004

    Petty Officer 1st Class Michael J. Pernaselli 27 Coastal Patrol Ship USS Firebolt Brighton, New York Killed when the small boat his seven-man team boarded exploded near Iraq's Khawr Al Amaya Oil Terminal in the Persian Gulf on April 24, 2004

    Staff Sgt. David S. Perry 36 649th Military Police Company, Army National Guard Bakersfield, California Killed when a suspicious package that he was inspecting exploded on August 10, 2003, in Baquabah, Iraq

    Sgt. 2nd Class Anton Petrov 26 1st Bulgarian Infantry Battalion Ruse, Bulgaria Killed when a car bomb exploded in the Bulgarian Army camp in Karbala, Iraq, on December 27, 2003

    Staff Sgt. Erickson H. Petty 28 Headquarters Company, 1st Battalion, 35th Armor Regiment, 1st Armored Division Fort Gibson, Oklahoma Killed in an attack by small-arms fire while he was providing security for a weapons cache in Salman Al Habb, Iraq, on May 3, 2004

    Pfc. Jerrick M. Petty 25 3rd Battalion, 502nd Infantry Regiment, 1st Brigade, 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault) Idaho Falls, Idaho Killed when he was attacked while guarding a gas station in Mosul, Iraq, on December 10, 2003

    Sgt. Jaror C. Puello- Coronado 36 310th Military Police Battalion, 800th Military Police Brigade Pocono Summit, Pennsylvania Died from injuries received when he was hit by a dump truck while manning a traffic point at Camp Edson, Iraq on July 13, 2003

    Staff Sgt. Michael B. Quinn 37 2nd Squadron, 3rd Armored Cavalry Regiment Tampa, Florida Killed on guard duty at a checkpoint by unknown assailants who fired on him from a vehicle on May 27, 2003, in Fallujah, Iraq

    Pfc. Ryan E. Reed 20 4th Battalion, 27th Field Artillery Regiment, 1st Armored Division Colorado Springs, Colorado Killed when a vehicle approached his unit while it was conducting a dismounted improvised explosive device sweep patrol and the driver detonated a bomb in Baghdad, Iraq, on April 29, 2004

    Spc. Ramon Reyes Torres 29 432nd Transportation Company, U.S. Army Reserve Caguas, Puerto Rico Killed when he sought cover from a passing truck that contained an explosive device in Baghdad, Iraq, on July 16, 2003

    Pfc. Diego Fernando Rincon 19 2nd Battalion, 7th Infantry Regiment, 1st Brigade, 3rd Infantry Division Conyers, Georgia Killed in car bomb attack in Iraq on March 29, 2003

    Pfc. Marlin T. Rockhold 23 3rd Battalion, 7th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Infantry Division Hamilton, Ohio Killed by a sniper while he was directing traffic in Baghdad on May 8, 2003

    Sgt. Randy S. Rosenberg 23 Company B, 1st Squadron, 9th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division Berlin, New Hampshire Killed when a vehicle-based improvised explosive device detonated in Khalidiyah, Iraq, on January 24, 2004

    1st Lt. Jonathan D. Rozier 25 2nd Battalion, 70th Armored Regiment, 3rd Brigade, 1st Armored Division Katy, Texas Killed when his unit was attacked with rocket-propelled grenades and small-arms fire while providing security at a municipal building in Baghdad, Iraq on July 19, 2003

    2nd Lt. Nikolay Saraev 26 1st Bulgarian Infantry Battalion Krumovgrad, Bulgaria Died in a Baghdad hospital one day after he was wounded when a car bomb exploded in the Bulgarian Army camp in Karbala, Iraq, on December 27, 2003

    Spc. Justin B. Schmidt N/A 4th Battalion, 27th Field Artillery Regiment, 1st Armored Division Bradenton, Florida Killed when a vehicle approached his unit while it was conducting a dismounted improvised explosive device sweep patrol and the driver detonated a bomb in Baghdad, Iraq, on April 29, 2004

    Staff Sgt. Wentz Jerome Henry Shanaberger III 33 21st Military Police Company, 16th Military Police Brigade, XVIIIth Airborne Corps Naples, Florida Killed when he was investigating a suspicious vehicle in Baqubah, Iraq, and was attacked by individuals using small arms and an improvised explosive device on March 24, 2004

    Pfc. Brandon C. Smith 20 3rd Battalion, 7th Marine Regiment, 1st Marine Division, 1st Marine Expeditionary Force Fayetteville, Arkansas Killed in action while conducting security and stability operations in Al Anbar province in northern Iraq on March 18, 2004

    Pfc. Andrew L. Tuazon 21 293rd Military Police Company, 3rd Military Police Battalion, 3rd Infantry Division Chesapeake, Virginia Died from hostile fire while on guard duty in Mosul, Iraq, on May 10, 2004

    Petty Officer 2nd Class Christopher E. Watts 28 Coastal Patrol Ship USS Firebolt Knoxville, Tennessee Killed when the small boat his seven-man team boarded exploded near Iraq's Khawr Al Amaya Oil Terminal in the Persian Gulf on April 24, 2004

    Pfc. Michael Russell Creighton Weldon 20 2nd Battalion, 7th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Infantry Division, U.S. Army Conyers, Georgia Killed in car bomb attack in Iraq on March 29, 2003

    Sgt. Eugene Williams 24 2nd Battalion, 7th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Infantry Division Highland, New York Killed in car bomb attack in Iraq on March 29, 2003

    Pfc. Jason G. Wright 19 1st Battalion, 502nd Infantry Regiment, 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault) Luzerne, Michigan Killed while on security duty when his vehicle came under fire from a passing vehicle in Mosul, Iraq, on December 8, 2003

    Robert J. Zangas 44 Department of the Army civilian assigned to the Coalition Provisional Authority Prince William County, Virginia Zangas, a former U.S. Marine Corps reservist who served in Iraq in 2003, was killed when gunmen posing as Iraqi police officers stopped his vehicle at a makeshift checkpoint near Hillah, Iraq, on March 9, 2004.


    These are just the men and women who died while providing security / manning a checkpoint / inspecting vehicles / or were attacked by car bombs / explosives -- It sounds as if there was plenty of reason to be suspicious of ANY vehicle that approached a checkpoint, especially if they weren't following commands.
  12. by   bluesky
    e e cummings

    Buffalo Bill's
    defunct
    who used to
    ride a watersmooth-silver
    stallion
    and break onetwothreefourfive pigeonsjustlikethat
    Jesus

    he was a handsome man
    and what i want to know is
    how do you like your blueeyed boy
    Mister Death
  13. by   Owney
    Psychomachia,

    By my count you have named fifty-five brave people who would still be DEFENDING us, instead of invading a country for no reason. Do we not call it the Department of Defense?
    Every scrap of evidence is that this war is biggest mistake in US history.

    Support our troops--bring them home.
  14. by   pickledpepperRN
    Quote from psychomachia
    a few more....


    These are just the men and women who died while providing security / manning a checkpoint / inspecting vehicles / or were attacked by car bombs / explosives -- It sounds as if there was plenty of reason to be suspicious of ANY vehicle that approached a checkpoint, especially if they weren't following commands.
    Yes, it is very dangerous. I admit that although all are created equal, each life precious I am most saddened when Americans die like this. Isn't it terrible?

    Why are our fine people manning roadblocks in other peoples neighborhoods?

    How do we help those who return with the memory of killing innocent people?

    Advice I gave the one soldier in northern Iraq who a group of us send 'care packages' to three times a month.
    "Keep your humanity. Report anything you know is wrong. Don't participate in anything you know is wrong."

    Should I e-mail him that horrible mistakes can happen that are not the fault of the person who cannot tell friend from foe?

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