lack of motivation of the generations since the 70's

  1. I am interested in the motivation and/or lak of motivation of the generations since the 70's. Why is it that young people have no drive. Our grandfathers would carry a dumptruck full of dirt shovel by shovel. Why is our society so apethetic despite capitalism?
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  2. 23 Comments

  3. by   burn out
    Quote from dbihl
    I am interested in the motivation and/or lak of motivation of the generations since the 70's. Why is it that young people have no drive. Our grandfathers would carry a dumptruck full of dirt shovel by shovel. Why is our society so apethetic despite capitalism?
    This is not the same America as it was for our grandfathers. The American dream has turned into a nightmare. No longer can our generation buy a home for 20,000 mor like 200,00. No longer can you support a family on just a high school education but now we have to go into debt from the beginning with student loans in order to get a decent job. Our economy is crashing how much is a dollar really worth today? The rich keep getting richer..how much is Oprah worth now? Our governemnt is scandal ridden and ineffective due to no legislation getting passed because the wrong president or party will get credit for something, there is nothing anyone in my state can buy that is not taxed, next it will the air that is taxed. Religion is taboo. We have electronic toys with porno and drugs at the end of our fingertips. Our school systems are overburdened and inadequately trained teachers.
    WHAT IS THERE TO MOTIVATE ANYONE TODAY? Yes our grandfathers could shovel dirt and make a living but today if you shovel dirt all you get are dirty hands.
    Last edit by NRSKarenRN on Feb 6, '07 : Reason: moved own thread
  4. by   mvanz9999
    Quote from dbihl
    I am interested in the motivation and/or lak of motivation of the generations since the 70's. Why is it that young people have no drive. Our grandfathers would carry a dumptruck full of dirt shovel by shovel. Why is our society so apethetic despite capitalism?
    Hm....well, one thing I know is "what comes around goes around". My grandparents' generation was one where you worked for a single company your whole life. They took care of you and you remained loyal to them.
    Now, a company will fire you because someone "doesn't like you". That's what happened to me. The company I work for owes me nothing. I, in turn, owe them nothing. End of story.

    Another thing is that there are no guarantees in life. I spend tens of thousands of dollars playing the med-school lottery. I didn't get in. Now I'm in debt, debt, debt and have nothing to show for it. Believe me, I worked hard. My pre-req GPA is a 4.0. So what's my motivation to work hard and be ambitious if it gets me nothing? If what it comes down to is working hard AND being in the right place at the right time?

    The dollar is becoming a lesser value. It's getting harder and harder to make it on any salary. I remember a delivery guy that used to pick up our backup tapes. He was in his early 60s I think. He told me the first house he bought, he got for $30K and paid for it with money he made delivering pizzas. For $30K you can't even get a college education.

    I think it's pathetic that I have a college education, a full time job with benefits, and yet I cannot afford my own healthcare. How insane is that?

    I'm so, so, so tired of politics. I'm not going to debate liberal vs. conservative. It doesn't matter. They both are horrendously bad choices. We don't have a true democracy. I'm left with choosing dumb and dumber. People frequently point out how horribly corrupt FOREIGN governments are, without noticing how corrupt our own government is. No matter which side you are on, you have to realize that our country is run by "C" students. Average.

    We are a wasteful, prideful nation. I feel as if, no matter how hard I work, I will never get ahead, and will never reach the level of financial comfort my own parents have. You can argue that I CAN achieve it, but I say that it's still a matter of being lucky in being in the right place at the right time. There's no motivation for that.
  5. by   Tweety
    Your grandparents generation said the same thing about your parents generation. Your parents generation said it about your generation.......and so it goes.

    I'm not willing to stereotype the generation coming behind me. I see many of them working long hard hours in the dot.com industry and other industries.

    In my world what I see as far as nursing is concerned are students working their little butts off to become nurses, most of them working part-time or full time jobs. Many of them were driven to get 4.0's just to get into nursing school. When they graduate they are side by side with me working their butts off.

    Most of us don't have to shovel dirt, but it doesn't mean we aren't working hard.
    Last edit by Tweety on Feb 6, '07
  6. by   clemmm78
    Another thing is the generalization thing. For every person you show me who isn't hard working, I can show you one who is. In my own kids, I can see that. I have one son (19) who works hard if it's something that interests him, otherwise, there's not much effort. I have a daughter (18) who moves heaven and earth to work hard for what she needs/wants, and I have another son (15) who is somewhere in the middle.
  7. by   Tweety
    Marijke, that is true. Which is why I have a problem with stereotyping this generation.

    Also, for every middle-aged person that works hard, I can show you a deadbeat. In fact the term "deadbeat dad" was coined for my generation.
  8. by   TheCommuter
    As the previous posters mentioned, times have changed drastically since the 1970s. Thirty years ago, a man with no education beyond high school could obtain a well-paying entry level job at a factory, supermarket, repair shop, sales, or doing construction. He could earn enough to support his wife and children without two incomes. This man could also comfortably afford the middle class comforts of American life such as a house, car, recreation, and savings.

    I know of very few working-class men in 2007 who earn enough to support their wives and children on a single income. In today's society a young person needs a college education as the ticket to a well-paying job, and college often does not get everyone a job. The value of a dollar has plummeted. Times have changed, so you cannot compare today's young people with those of the 1970s.

    By the way, I do not fit your stereotype of a young adult with no ambition. I work 40 hours per week and attend school full-time. I have been a proud homeowner since the age of 22; in addition, I have 2 newer cars in my driveway. I am doing these things without a spouse or parents to help me, as I am a single female. In addition, I did grueling work at a factory for 3 years but entered nursing because I didn't want to be worn-down like my coworkers.
  9. by   SmilingBluEyes
    Since the time of Socrates, elder generations have worried about the ones to follow-----each has worried the world was going to hell in a handbasket due to the troubled generation coming up. I personally, try to be much more optimistic than that. I see a great lot of reason for hope and inspiration in the generations coming up. Sure, they have their problems but I can remember my own parents saying the same things about me and my friends (we were lazy, unmotivated and basically clueless in their eyes). Yet, each of us is successfully, gainfully employed and doing well today.

    What each generation prizes, values, and holds dear can be unique and yet, also be a barrier to understanding the others.......but I would not lose hope.

    The old saying is still applicable: is the glass half full or empty? Depends on whom is asked.

    Maybe we better ask ourselves, what kind of example are we providing and what kind of world are we leaving our future generations to inherit?

    After all, far as I know, nobody here ever asked to be born and no single person, nor generation, is born in complete control of their destinies. We all have to make our own ways with what we have. I also believe the generation that follows, both good and bad, reflects a lot of what the generation before it has given them, or shown them as an example. Fortunately, I believe we will make it. I have to! And I believe in our young people today. I see a lot promise in them----and hope in their eyes. If I sound over-pollyann-ish I am sorry. It's just how I feel about this.
    Last edit by SmilingBluEyes on Feb 6, '07
  10. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    Quote from dbihl
    I am interested in the motivation and/or lak of motivation of the generations since the 70's. Why is it that young people have no drive. Our grandfathers would carry a dumptruck full of dirt shovel by shovel. Why is our society so apethetic despite capitalism?
    What are your solutions to the problem(s) that you speak of?
  11. by   TheCommuter
    Quote from Marie_LPN
    What are your solutions to the problem(s) that you speak of?
    :yeahthat:
  12. by   JBudd
    Now hang on here!
    I'm not grandfatherly (or -motherly!) age, and I am from the 70's! Graduated HS in 77. (I remember specifically telling my oldest I am not READY to be a grandmother either)
    They weren't that long ago! :roll

    There were lazy scuts in my class, just like there are amoung the new grads here in my hospital. Good and Bad in every generation.
  13. by   Spidey's mom
    My husband and I were discussing this in relation to sports in school. He says that it doesn't seem like kids care that much about the teamwork involved in playing sports. That they aren't excited about being part of a team. That they don't work hard or care that they are letting their teammates down. It is more self-centered . . . . what can I get out of it?

    Also, trying to find people to work in the woods doing hard manual labor is very difficult. Mostly we have to weed through drug or alcohol addicts with no driver's licence.

    I don't think you can stereotype either . . .but there are some changes.

    steph
  14. by   Tweety
    Steph, since every generation says the same things, sometimes I think part of it is that we change as we age. Probably to a lot of us complaining were indeed hardworking team players, but that doesn't mean all our peers were in our generation back in a day. We look back at our own generation with the rose colored glasses that were our youth, and we look at the present generation with the critical eye of a middle aged adult that has lived and learned a lot.

    I'm not disputing your observations. Just food for thought.

    Maybe you lead a more sheltered existance. But my generation when I grew up were potheads, drops outs, part of a spoiled geneation that really didn't want for anything and it was always given. Natrually I can't stereotype my own generation either because many of us had to work hard for what we got.

    Yes, definately for sure generations change over time. Comparing apples and organes may not even be fair.

    I ask you, if this younger generation is so lazy and un-team spirited, who raised them?

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