How Much Leftist Ideology Has Corrupted Nursing? - page 13

I'm heading into my BScN in September, and wondering how much leftist nonsense will be in my program? Should I expect to see a lot of it, or very little? Considering it's a BSc I'm hoping very... Read More

  1. by   elkpark
    Quote from CBlover
    The cause of segregation was originally from the Bible? I have never heard of that but I haven't heard of everything. I had a history major and nearly graduated as a history teacher and never ran across that in my studies, yet like I said, doesn't mean it's not true.
    I'm sorry but anyone owning a business is not required to provide a service to you or me or anyone else they choose. Saying you MUST serve anyone is crap. Dear me I go to restaurants all the time that say "No shirt, no shoes, no service." There is a myriad of reasons business owners may or may not provide their service. (Disclaimer: I'm referring to anyone outside the 7 protected classes, which shouldn't be discriminated against)
    ... Although Bob Jones Jr., the school’s founder, argued that racial segregation was mandated by the Bible, Falwell and Weyrich quickly sought to shift the grounds of the debate, ...

    The Real Origins of the Religious Right - POLITICO Magazine


    If you are against segregation and against racial separation, then you are against God Almighty because He made racial separation in order to preserve the race through whom He could send the Messiah and through whom He could send the Bible. God is the author of segregation. God is the author of Jewish separation and Gentile separation and Japanese separation. God made of one blood all nations, but He also drew the boundary lines between races.

    racism - What are the biblical justifications for racial segregation? - Christianity Stack Exchange


    It was especially during this time that African Americans began forming their own churches, in part because of the unequal treatment they were facing in integrated churches in both the North and the South. Christian theology was often used to justify this split, with the implication that it was God's plan to have people separated by race.[4]

    Racial segregation of churches in the United States - Wikipedia


    For hundreds of years, the so-called curse of Ham was frequently taught by religious leaders as the source for racial differences, and in more recent times was seized on as a Biblical excuse for segregation and slavery, said Tabachnick. “There’s been a shift, and you don’t often see churches that are this forthright now, but the underlying theme is still there in fundamentalist holdout churches.”

    The Appleby church, whose pastor could not immediately be reached for comment, proclaims a litany of racist beliefs on its website: The black descendants of Ham like fair-skinned women, of course. And “the proof of the presence of God among the Israelites was the absence of the black skinned folk of Canaan … It is obvious God is a separator, not a mixer. It is God who set the boundaries.”


    Religious Racism: Texas Church Argues There's a Biblical Precedent for Strict Racial Segregation | Alternet


    So just as century and a half ago, white supremacy, the assumed inferiority of other races, and a disgust of black flesh ran deep in the psychologies of white Christians–and it was explicit. Some of their “best” theologians devoted their time and energy to interpreting the Bible in defense of white supremacy, slavery, and segregation. They used that doctrine to tap into anxieties, fears, and prejudices in order to exclude, deny rights, enslave and abuse African Americans.

    How the Bible was Used to Justify Slavery and White Supremacy


    These lynchings weren’t just vigilante punishments or, as the Equal Justice Initiative notes, “celebratory acts of racial control and domination.” They were rituals. And specifically, they were rituals of Southern evangelicalism and its then-dogma of purity, literalism, and white supremacy. “Christianity was the primary lens through which most southerners conceptualized and made sense of suffering and death of any sort,” writes historian Amy Louise Wood in Lynching and Spectacle: Witnessing Racial Violence in America, 1890–1940. “It would be inconceivable that they could inflict pain and torment on the bodies of black men without imagining that violence as a religious act, laden with Christian symbolism and significance” ... The God of the white South demanded purity—embodied by the white woman. White southerners would build the barrier with segregation. But when it was breached, lynching was the way they would mend the fence and affirm their freedom from the moral contamination, represented by blacks and black men in particular ... Many other defenders of lynching understood their acts as a Christian duty, consecrated as God’s will against racial transgression. “After Smith’s lynching,” Wood notes, “another defender wrote, ‘It was nothing but the vengeance of an outraged God, meted out to him, through the instrumentality of the people that caused the cremation.’ ” As UNC–Chapel Hill Professor Emeritus Donald G. Mathews writes in the Journal of Southern Religion, “Religion permeated communal lynching because the act occurred within the context of a sacred order designed to sustain holiness.” The “sacred order” was white supremacy and the “holiness” was white virtue ... Still, we can’t deny that lynching—in all of its grotesque brutality—was an act of religious significance justified by the Christianity of the day.

    Jim Crow South’s lynching of blacks and Christianity: The terror inflicted by whites was considered a religious ritual.

    Why Did So Many Christians Support Slavery?

    Key reasons advanced by southern church leaders
    ...

    Why Did So Many Christians Support Slavery?
    | Christian History



    One such area that has been permitted in the minds of many to come under the umbrella of Biblical sanction is that deal*ing with the origin of race and support for segregation ...

    Biblical Myths for Racial Segregation - Ministry Magazine


    In Acts 17:26 this is what Paul says:

    “And hath made of one blood all nations of men for to dwell on all the face of the earth, and hath determined the times before appointed, and the bounds of their habitation….”

    In the Greek here, for nations, we have the word “ethnos” where we get our word for “ethnic.” Strong's definition of the word says: race (as of the same habitat), i.e. tribe. The Greek word for "bounds" is "horothesia" and literally means boarders. Also, the Greek word for "determined" is "katoikeo" and is in the present active tense meaning to "house permanently." Here we see that God has determined that segregation be maintained and to be maintained nationally and “ethnically.” Even in Revelation 21:4, 22:2 we see that these national distinctions are maintained and not eliminated.

    We should remember that from the Tower of Babel, mankind had originally come together to make a “name for themselves.” I cannot help but see this in America where it is the largest melting pot that exists today. Who are we to presumme upon reversing the judgments of God and hope for blessing? What this nation is essentially doing is defying the very order of God for societies by and through mass amalgamation and miscegenation that has brought this nation to its knees.

    Is there no wisdom to be found in Acts 17:26 for an orderly society? Why have so many of us been convinced that “mixing” is the best solution for this nation? Have we no regard for God’s design and plan for a society? What exactly can one point to as occurring from this that has caused wide sweeping benefits for this nation?


    Philip Stallings: Does The Bible Support Racial Diversity Or Segregation?

    Many people have asked us if there is anything about racial segregation in the Bible. When told that there is, this request invariably comes forth: "Then do tell us where to find such information." As a matter of fact, the Bible has so much to say on this subject that it cannot be covered fully in the space of a twopart magazine article. Therefore, the information contained herein is intended to serve mainly as an outline of Biblical events and teachings which have a bearing on the explosive racial issues now making headlines in the news of the world ... Yes, the Bible is a discriminating Book, both as to race and creed. Beware of the cliche "no discrimination." Unless, of course, you want to join hands with international schemers in destroying the Christian heritage which guarantees your freedom.

    The race of Abraham, Isaac, Jacob and Joseph now the kindred AngloSaxonCeltic Christian peoples of the United States, the British Company of Nations, and Western Europe cannot commit to other races the supreme place which God has assigned to that race alone. The exalted position of the Bible's Covenant Race carries with it worldwide moral and spiritual responsibilities, which no other race has the Godgiven ability to perform. This Divine commission demands of us the spirit of humility and love. As the Apostle Paul reminds us, "Who maketh thee to differ from another? And what hast thou that thou didst not receive?" ...


    The Bible and Segregation - forbids interracial marriage


    This chapter demonstrates how the biblical case for racial segregation enjoyed a renaissance after the Brown decision because religion itself seemed a threat to southern apartheid. Religious assaults on segregation included the major denominations' support for Brown, the faith-based activism of many black leaders, and the growing conviction that the Christian faith mandated racial equality. The religious case for segregation took various guises in the form of an influential phenomenon Paul Harvey described as “segregationist folk theology.” Mississippi lawmakers in the post-Brown era wanted to give a legal and political expression to the divine plan for the races, offering protection to congregations that perceived a danger to segregation from their own denominations. Yet, many white Mississippians, convinced that their racial system lay safe in the church's hands, objected to this intrusion of the state into religious affairs.

    http://www.universitypressscholarshi...15-chapter-005


    ... When legal segregation came under concerted attack in the 1950s, the first impulse of many white Christians was to revive the curse as a Biblical defense of racial separation ...

    https://books.google.com/books?id=eA...gation&f=false

    Shall I go on? There's plenty more documentation out there. I'm sorry that wasn't mentioned in your history studies, but it's no secret. As recently as the 1950s and '60s, people throughout the country (primarily but not exclusively in the South) claimed that their beliefs that God was opposed to the mixing of the races entitled them to refuse to accommodate African-Americans in their places of business, and plenty of states had laws on the books supporting those beliefs. Nowadays, those views and laws are seen as indisputably backward and bigoted, and no one would dare suggest that a business owner should be able to refuse service to any individual because of her/his race. It's just a matter of time (and I'm sure it will be sooner rather than later) that the silliness about wanting to be legally allowed to discriminate against LGBTQI individuals will be seen as equally ignorant and backward. People can believe whatever they want to in their hearts, and are welcome to do so, but that's no excuse for discriminatory behavior.

    And, by the way, there are quite a few states in the US that do outlaw discrimination on the basis of "sexual orientation, gender identity and gender expression."

    http://www.npr.org/sections/itsallpo...of-lgbt-people

    The baker who is arguing his right to discriminate against gay couples all the way to the Supreme Court is in Colorado, one of the states which does have legislation which bans exactly the kind of discrimination he is arguing he should be allowed to practice. (He is claiming that he has a First Amendment right to discriminate against gay couples because of his religious beliefs that trumps the state law.) LGBTQI individuals are "a protected class" in Colorado -- so what does that do to your disclaimer about the "protected classes which shouldn't be discriminated against"? Or do you get to decide who it is or isn't okay to discriminate against?
  2. by   elkpark
    Quote from CBlover
    You just proved my point. Actually, I DO pay for roadways, public school systems, police and firefighters, etc when I pay taxes. THAT is what's robbery. When I have no choice but to look at my paystub and say oh well, 30% of my check is going who knows where, maybe help pay for someone's abortion. Believe me, I'm forced to do plenty of things against my beliefs. I don't owe society. Just because I'm provided things like roadways THAT I PAY FOR, doesn't oblige you my service.
    Perhaps not, but being licensed by the state to operate a business obligates you to abide by the laws of the state regarding the operation of businesses, including state laws about discrimination in public accommodations.
  3. by   Tetra
    The whole baker thing confuses me... isn't this what a free market is for? He'll just go out of business because another baker will pop up to provide a supply for the demand. Others will see his views as non progressive and stop shopping there... Let the system work itself out. The idea that one can force someone to provide them service is completely immoral to me. No one is entitled to anyone's service.
  4. by   herring_RN
    Quote from Tetra
    The whole baker thing confuses me... isn't this what a free market is for? He'll just go out of business because another baker will pop up to provide a supply for the demand. Others will see his views as non progressive and stop shopping there... Let the system work itself out. The idea that one can force someone to provide them service is completely immoral to me. No one is entitled to anyone's service.
    Would you be confused if a retail establishment denied the use of their public bathroom to one or more customers?
    That was a common occurrence before implementation of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 which states:
    TITLE II--INJUNCTIVE RELIEF AGAINST DISCRIMINATION IN PLACES OF PUBLIC ACCOMMODATION
    SEC. 201. (a) All persons shall be entitled to the full and equal enjoyment of the goods, services, facilities, and privileges, advantages, and accommodations of any place of public accommodation, as defined in this section, without discrimination or segregation on the ground of race, color, religion, or national origin...
    https://www.eeoc.gov/eeoc/history/35...ights_act.html
    Federal law includes "Any Retail Establishment" in the list of businesses that are a "Public Accommodation" under the law.

    Below is from the "Colorado Division of Civil Rights Public Accommodation law"
    ... Places of public accommodation include a restaurant, hospital, hotel, retail store and public transportation, among others.

    Prohibited discriminatory practices in places of public accommodation must be based on certain protected classes and include these adverse actions: denial of service, terms and conditions, unequal treatment, failure to accommodate and retaliation.

    Protected classes for places of public accommodation are: Race, Color, Disability, Sex, Sexual Orientation (including transgender status), National Origin/Ancestry, Creed, Marital Status and Retaliation...
    Public Accommodations Discrimination | Department of Regulatory Agencies
    Almost certainly the Supreme Court will hear the Colorado Bakery case:
    Supreme Court to take case on baker who refused to sell wedding cake to gay couple - The Washington Post

    I am Christian. I cannot believe God would send anyone to hell for baking a cake.
    I cannot find where the Bible calls Christians to deny services to people who are engaging in behavior they believe violates the teachings of Christianity regarding marriage.
    I cannot find that Jesus taught that providing such a service could be construed as participation or affirmation.

    I believe he did say, " Thou shalt love thy neighbor as thyself."
    Last edit by herring_RN on Sep 25 : Reason: typo
  5. by   CBlover
    Quote from heron
    The thievery comes in when you assert that you are entitled to my financial support without any return benefit to me. Maybe after a good night's sleep you'll be better able to explain why that isn't theft.
    I think that's a ridiculous notion. I give gobs back into my community. I still don't have to bake you a cake if I don't want to. Done.
  6. by   CBlover
    Quote from elkpark
    Perhaps not, but being licensed by the state to operate a business obligates you to abide by the laws of the state regarding the operation of businesses, including state laws about discrimination in public accommodations.
    Gay is not a protected class. That's ALL IM SAYING. If I said "You're black I'm not making you a cake!" I'd be breaking the law. It's discrimination. If they wanna add gays to that list, so let it be. I'll be required by law to bake you one. Until then, it's my decision. And this, "you drive on these roads I help pay for and you live in this civilized infrastructure I helped build so you have to make me a cake" is absolutely absurd. That's socialism at its finest. No thanks.
  7. by   elkpark
    Quote from CBlover
    Gay is not a protected class. That's ALL IM SAYING. If I said "You're black I'm not making you a cake!" I'd be breaking the law. It's discrimination. If they wanna add gays to that list, so let it be. I'll be required by law to bake you one. Until then, it's my decision. And this, "you drive on these roads I help pay for and you live in this civilized infrastructure I helped build so you have to make me a cake" is absolutely absurd. That's socialism at its finest. No thanks.
    Once again, gay is a "protected class" under Colorado law (where the baker is located and operating his business). It is unlawful discrimination per Colorado law, plain and simple, for the owner of a retail establishment to refuse to serve a potential customer because of her/his sexual orientation. Legally, it's not any different than saying "'You're black I'm not baking you a cake!'" Herring has already linked and quoted the state law. What difficulty are you having grasping this?

    Similar to nursing licenses (you do understand those, right?), people who choose to pursue a state license to operate a business are legally required to operate their businesses under the regulations and requirements set by the state. People who have moral or religious objections to meeting the requirements set by the state are free to not operate a business in that state. But they don't get to operate their business in violation of the regulations and requirements attached to their business license.
  8. by   toomuchbaloney
    Must be that Christians think that they get special waivers when it comes to state laws and discrimination.

    So much privilege.
  9. by   Ted
    Quote from toomuchbaloney
    Must be that Christians think that they get special waivers when it comes to state laws and discrimination.

    So much privilege.
    Clarification: Those who claim to be Christian and yet wallow themselves in blatant bigotry are not following Christian principles and values. They are bigots. Period.
  10. by   Lil Nel
    I thought the title of this thread read something about leftist thinking and nursing.

    How did the discussion devolve into Christianity and the baking of cakes? Not on point, people. Those issues need a new thread.
  11. by   CBlover
    Quote from Lil Nel
    I thought the title of this thread read something about leftist thinking and nursing.

    How did the discussion devolve into Christianity and the baking of cakes? Not on point, people. Those issues need a new thread.
    I started wondering the same thing lol
  12. by   Ted
    Quote from Lil Nel
    I thought the title of this thread read something about leftist thinking and nursing.

    How did the discussion devolve into Christianity and the baking of cakes? Not on point, people. Those issues need a new thread.
    For good for for bad, religion, especially the Christian religion, is tightly intertwined with U.S. political thinking, often found in these "Left verses Right" political discussions/debates. It's often difficult to separate the two.

    For the record. . . I advocate the separation of church and state, especially on the governmental, law-making level.
  13. by   elkpark
    Quote from CBlover
    I started wondering the same thing lol
    You're wondering? You're the individual who first brought up marriage equality, the baker in CO, and keeps insisting that gays are not a protected class and don't deserve protection from discrimination.

    Mystery solved.

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