Help! My Husband Snores Like A Category 5 Hurricane! - page 2

Here I sit in the smallest bedroom of he house where I've taken refuge for the past 15 months, sound machine loudly running. The timbers of our house creak and groan overhead as my husband slumbers... Read More

  1. by   3ringnursing
    Quote from Been there,done that
    he is in denial,and will not change.
    This I know (perhaps I have a bit of denial too?) but I guess I hope something will create change. This truly sucks.

    From what I'm reading here denial seems to be mass rampant with a certain population of snorer's. I'm not sure how that can even be for him - he has woken himself more than once on a really good honk/tweet/snore (looking rather surprised) that had enough suction action going on to suck in a bowling ball.

    He's an OT, and spends all day working with various patient populations reteaching various life skills. He couldn't possibly want to join his patients? I fear this is the direction Mr. Stubborn is heading.

    His mother has mild to moderate dementia that is worsening as time passes. I know for fact she snores too.

    I thank everyone for their input and for sharing their own stories. That is very giving of you all. Much obliged.
  2. by   OrganizedChaos
    My husband snores too & shakes his legs while he sleeps. Talk about a horrible combination! I believe his snoring has more to do with my husband being horribly overweight (6' & 400lb+) than anything else.

    He has such an addictive personality that I can't get him to quit eating junk. First he was addicted to drugs, then cigarettes & now food. Maybe one day I can get him addicted to healthy food & exercise.
  3. by   3ringnursing
    Quote from OrganizedChaos
    My husband snores too & shakes his legs while he sleeps. Talk about a horrible combination!

    I hear ya - my husband broke his leg on a pony at 2 y.o., this was the reason he said he rocks that leg back and forth while falling to sleep. I married him when I was 17 and now I'm 50 … as of 15 months ago when I moved into another bedroom he still did it, and likely still does. Every comforter we own is all pilly from that back and forth motion on his side of the bed.

    I find it funny the cats moved with me into my room when I got the heck out of Dodge in favor of some sleep. Apparently the noise kept them awake too.
  4. by   BeckyESRN
    My husband snores like crazy as well. His pulm. doc told him that he needs to get his tonsils removed and, if he did, he could probably stop wearing the CPAP. This was 6 years ago... He stopped wearing his CPAP for almost a year, which meant one of us sleeping on the couch and him feeling exhausted all day, everyday. He finally went to "The Sleep Store" at our local mall, he was able to try out different CPAP masks and decided what he liked. Previously, the doc had recommended nasal pillows with a chin strap, this time he picked out a full mask and seriously, he has not slept without it, not even once, since getting a mask that he likes. The first week of wearing it, he commented on how much more awake he felt and he stopped needing excessive amounts of coffee during his night shifts.

    Maybe you have a similar store close by that you could convince him to check out? Amazon also has a decent selection of masks.
  5. by   3ringnursing
    Quote from BeckyESRN
    My husband snores like crazy as well. His pulm. doc told him that he needs to get his tonsils removed and, if he did, he could probably stop wearing the CPAP. This was 6 years ago... He stopped wearing his CPAP for almost a year, which meant one of us sleeping on the couch and him feeling exhausted all day, everyday. He finally went to "The Sleep Store" at our local mall, he was able to try out different CPAP masks and decided what he liked. Previously, the doc had recommended nasal pillows with a chin strap, this time he picked out a full mask and seriously, he has not slept without it, not even once, since getting a mask that he likes. The first week of wearing it, he commented on how much more awake he felt and he stopped needing excessive amounts of coffee during his night shifts.

    Maybe you have a similar store close by that you could convince him to check out? Amazon also has a decent selection of masks.

    That's a great idea. I'll check it out.

    First I need to convince him he needs it - I thinking putting his CPOX on his finger and filming him with my cellphone is a good place to start. I enlisted the help of my son as my accomplice who is on board.

    I'll keep you all posted.
  6. by   Ruby Vee
    Quote from BeckyESRN
    My husband snores like crazy as well. His pulm. doc told him that he needs to get his tonsils removed and, if he did, he could probably stop wearing the CPAP. This was 6 years ago... He stopped wearing his CPAP for almost a year, which meant one of us sleeping on the couch and him feeling exhausted all day, everyday. He finally went to "The Sleep Store" at our local mall, he was able to try out different CPAP masks and decided what he liked. Previously, the doc had recommended nasal pillows with a chin strap, this time he picked out a full mask and seriously, he has not slept without it, not even once, since getting a mask that he likes. The first week of wearing it, he commented on how much more awake he felt and he stopped needing excessive amounts of coffee during his night shifts.

    Maybe you have a similar store close by that you could convince him to check out? Amazon also has a decent selection of masks.
    Yes, I should have brought up the issue of masks, too. The right mask can make all the difference. CPAP.com has masks, too. And the last time I checked, they had "mask insurance." So if you bought the mask and it didn't fit or wasn't comfortable, you could return it and try another one.
  7. by   Ruby Vee
    Quote from 3ringnursing
    This I know (perhaps I have a bit of denial too?) but I guess I hope something will create change. This truly sucks.

    From what I'm reading here denial seems to be mass rampant with a certain population of snorer's. I'm not sure how that can even be for him - he has woken himself more than once on a really good honk/tweet/snore (looking rather surprised) that had enough suction action going on to suck in a bowling ball.

    He's an OT, and spends all day working with various patient populations reteaching various life skills. He couldn't possibly want to join his patients? I fear this is the direction Mr. Stubborn is heading.

    His mother has mild to moderate dementia that is worsening as time passes. I know for fact she snores too.

    I thank everyone for their input and for sharing their own stories. That is very giving of you all. Much obliged.
    Denial is not associated with knowledge . . . even nurses who worked with a physician who was researching the effects of sleep apnea on the heart (DH and I) can be in denial about sleep apnea. I accepted my cancer diagnosis (all three of them) every so much more easily than the OSA diagnosis. People do not want to strap a mask on their faces every night to go to sleep, and they'll deny they need it with their last breath. No one wants to appear ridiculous to their partner, and what is more ridiculous than strapping a mask to your face, turning on a blower and THEN settling for sleep? And you feel like such a failure if you cannot do something as simple as SLEEP without machinery!

    I sympathize with your situation. If there's ANY chance that you might have OSA, try the "I'll do it if you will" approach. And you'd be doing both of you a favor.
  8. by   3ringnursing
    Quote from Ruby Vee
    Yes, I should have brought up the issue of masks, too. The right mask can make all the difference. CPAP.com has masks, too. And the last time I checked, they had "mask insurance." So if you bought the mask and it didn't fit or wasn't comfortable, you could return it and try another one.

    Really? That's some cool information to have in my arsenal when I go on the frontal attack of the Battle of the Snoring. He has terrible buyer's remorse (the last time we bought a couch, love seat and recliners I believe he looked in every store in town. Researched everything for best price, quality, etc … then felt he made the wrong choice and perseverated on it for weeks). That store won't know what hit them when he goes looking for a mask! LOLOLOL … this should be entertaining!
  9. by   3ringnursing
    Quote from Ruby Vee
    Denial is not associated with knowledge . . . even nurses who worked with a physician who was researching the effects of sleep apnea on the heart (DH and I) can be in denial about sleep apnea. I accepted my cancer diagnosis (all three of them) every so much more easily than the OSA diagnosis. People do not want to strap a mask on their faces every night to go to sleep, and they'll deny they need it with their last breath. No one wants to appear ridiculous to their partner, and what is more ridiculous than strapping a mask to your face, turning on a blower and THEN settling for sleep? And you feel like such a failure if you cannot do something as simple as SLEEP without machinery!

    I sympathize with your situation. If there's ANY chance that you might have OSA, try the "I'll do it if you will" approach. And you'd be doing both of you a favor.


    I'm fairly sure I don't have OSA, but why not? There is worse things than spending the night doing a sleep study (like listening to the rumbling buzz from across the hall - it sounds like a bear in hibernation, or a nest of dragons).

    I know I talk in my sleep, a lot. He's complained about it, and I've woken up talking or giggling on occasion too. Yeah, that must be pretty annoying, but it's not all night long. Not that I will ever admit that to him.

    I really appreciate everyone's suggestions. Thank you - again, I will keep anyone who is interested posted on the out come.
  10. by   Ruby Vee
    Quote from 3ringnursing
    I'm fairly sure I don't have OSA, but why not? There is worse things than spending the night doing a sleep study (like listening to the rumbling buzz from across the hall - it sounds like a bear in hibernation, or a nest of dragons).

    I know I talk in my sleep, a lot. He's complained about it, and I've woken up talking or giggling on occasion too. Yeah, that must be pretty annoying, but it's not all night long. Not that I will ever admit that to him.

    I really appreciate everyone's suggestions. Thank you - again, I will keep anyone who is interested posted on the out come.
    Please keep me posted!
  11. by   Meeshie
    My aunt was a snorer with sleep apnea. She refused to wear a mask because it was uncomfortable and "no big deal." Three weeks ago she and my uncle went to sleep and only my uncle woke up.. next to her body. She stopped breathing during the night and did not restart.

    Get a good insurance policy on your spouse, especially if you have children to raise.
  12. by   martymoose
    As we all know , being HCP's , there are some things we cant change .My husband is one of the. I swear he is going out of his way to d everything that could be wrong for a person to do to themselves.

    He has sleep apnea. Ive explained to him I remember working in the EP lab of a pt that needed an AICD for an EF of 15, I believe. That guy was in his 50's, slightly overweight, but big time apnea. I never saw such an enlarged heart ever! i swear it was as wide as his whole chest!

    Do you think that had any impact on my husband? No.
    That his mother died at 60 from chf, obesity and copd? No. ( and she even wore her cpap faithfully!)

    He tried it for a while. Couldnt wear it because he would wake up in a panic and rip it off his face and throw it( while half asleep) heaven forbid anyone touches him when he is asleep too- has such an awful startle reaction you'd probably get punched.

    needless to say, we sleep in seperate quarters. And he wonders why I dont want to be around him. Duh.

    Stubborness at its finenest. Actually theres a nother name for it that begins with an A , but we're not aloowed to say it here.
  13. by   3ringnursing
    Quote from Meeshie
    My aunt was a snorer with sleep apnea. She refused to wear a mask because it was uncomfortable and "no big deal." Three weeks ago she and my uncle went to sleep and only my uncle woke up.. next to her body. She stopped breathing during the night and did not restart.

    Get a good insurance policy on your spouse, especially if you have children to raise.

    I'm so sorry for your loss.

    This is what frustrates me the most. His laissez faire attitude that it's no big deal. We've all seen diabetics, or people Dx'd with HTN who take this attitude and it doesn't work out so well. He thinks he's special and therefore it doesn't apply to him. I hope someday he doesn't reach the point of no return when he discovers how wrong he is.

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