Has the Chirstian Right gone mad?

  1. I don't mean to offend anyone by this topic, but I saw this the other day and thought it was absurd! Here is the article from the Washington post:
    http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn...103000747.html

    I can understand if you're against abortion or even against euthanasia, but this is just ridiculous. How many people die of cervical cancer? Do they really think more people will have sex because there is one less risk out there? Most teens don't even link cervical cancer with sex anyway and we all know that teens don't care about the risks down the road, only the here and now. Plus, we still have AIDS, herpes, hep C. and all the other nasties. I hate to say but do these people actually like the fact that we have STD's? Does it give some kind of basis to their cause? How many healthcare professionals on this board seriously believe that being vaccinated against HPV will increase sexual activity?
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  2. 19 Comments

  3. by   SmilingBluEyes
    I have problems with certain legislation like this, but let's PLEASE NOT qualify all such people as "mad" who are for such laws....be especially careful of lumping groups such as "the Christian Right" together........not all Christians are on the "right" and not all people on the "right" are Christian. The title is very offputting to me, anyhow.
  4. by   UM Review RN
    Frankly, I think it's the government that's gone mad. To require millions of young girls to take a vaccination that will have its own set of s/e's on the GUESS that SOME of them will be infected, and then a relative FEW of those will get cervical cancer?

    It's not like smallpox, whooping cough, or polio.

    So I doubt that'd fly with a lot of parents, not just the Christian Right.
  5. by   SmilingBluEyes
    I think vaccination against HPV is a good thing-----not all who contract it are promiscuous, at all. But it should not be REQUIRED of anyone. As with anything, the benefits and risks should be explained and informed consent given for any vaccination, HPV included. But like I said, it's a good thing if it prevents the spread of HPV and cervical cancers.

    There are people I know who had ONE partner, and were committed and still got this disease and cervical dysplasia because of it. The rate of HPV is epidemic, and clearly,something needs to be done to stem its growth. That is my opinion, anyhow.
  6. by   mitchsmom
    Wonder if they would oppose an HIV vaccine? As far as I know, they don't oppose the hep B vax. Speaking of, I wonder why the pro people don't advocate for just giving it in infancy like hep B?

    I am just not of the "turn a blind eye" ilk... I say information = power. Surely there have been studies on this old argument about more information/birth control, etc. & the resultant sex rate among young people?? I wouldn't think any would show kids going to do it because they had sex ed or a vaccine for something that can be transmitted sexually.
  7. by   mitchsmom
    Quote from Angie O'Plasty, RN
    ...To require millions of young girls to take a vaccination that will have its own set of s/e's on the GUESS that SOME of them will be infected, and then a relative FEW of those will get cervical cancer?

    It's not like smallpox, whooping cough, or polio....
    I hear what you are saying, but actually, by the numbers quoted, more people ARE currenly dying of cervical cancer than smallpox or polio.
  8. by   UM Review RN
    Quote from mitchsmom
    I hear what you are saying, but actually, by the numbers quoted, more people ARE currenly dying of cervical cancer than smallpox or polio.
    I'm not sure we're on the same page here. Let me clarify.

    I have a really hard time believing that HPV is that prevalent among the population, for one thing. I believe that most women will not get infected with HPV.

    Then I see, of those women who are infected with HPV, 3700 women die of cervical cancer each year.

    That simply does not compare against the kind of disease or the percentage of deaths that occurred before vaccinations became available for smallpox, whooping cough, and polio.

    In other words, the numbers themselves might compare, but the percentage per population would have to be the same because we have a larger population now and all that.
  9. by   mitchsmom
    Quote from Angie O'Plasty, RN
    I'm not sure we're on the same page here. Let me clarify.

    I have a really hard time believing that HPV is that prevalent among the population, for one thing. I believe that most women will not get infected with HPV.

    Then I see, of those women who are infected with HPV, 3700 women die of cervical cancer each year.

    That simply does not compare against the kind of disease or the percentage of deaths that occurred before vaccinations became available for smallpox, whooping cough, and polio.

    In other words, the numbers themselves might compare, but the percentage per population would have to be the same because we have a larger population now and all that.
    I think I see what you are saying... you don't feel that 3700 people a year (as opposed to the larger numbers that polio/smallpox historically affected), is enough deaths to warrant a vaccine to prevent them?
  10. by   UM Review RN
    Wow. I answered this awhile ago, but I guess it didn't "take." So I'll try again.

    Please don't misunderstand. I am not opposed to the vaccine per se. I am opposed to making it mandatory. Parents should make the decision for minors, and young women may decide for themselves.

    Just my opinion. I respect those who do not agree.
  11. by   ZASHAGALKA
    As a member of the 'Christian Right', I am not mad - I'm mainstream (look at the red state/blue state map.)

    If the vaccine proves to be safe, it should be administered - to both boys and girls - as young as possible, and certainly before the age when outliers on the bell curve begin to engage in sex (say at age 8).

    boys innoculated cannot give it to girls not innoculated.

    But it would be as pointless to make this vaccine voluntary as it would to make polio or whooping cough voluntary. If any significant percentage of the pop remains un-inocculated - that population remains a reservoir for the virus.

    The problem w/ your title is that you assume all Christian Right are extreme right, when in fact, it is a mainstream view (When the 2004 election turned on 4 million MORE voters that identify as Christian Right voting than did in 2000 - out of 50 million total votes, that can hardly be qualified as an extremist belief). Only Left ideologues believe that anybody to the right of them are extremists. It would be the equivalent of my saying that anybody to the left of me are all moveon.org supporting, Micheal Moore lovers.

    ~faith,
    Timothy.
    Last edit by ZASHAGALKA on Oct 31, '05
  12. by   VickyRN
    Human Papillomavirus (HPV) is the most common STI/ STD. Approximately 20 million people in US are currently infected with HPV, with 6.2 million new cases each year. At least 50 percent of sexually active men and women acquire genital HPV infection at some point in their lives. By age 50, approximately 80 percent of women will have acquired genital HPV infection. (Just taught this content). HPV is the most prevalent STI/ STD. Thankfully, not every strain of HPV can cause dysplasia or cervical cancer. Most people who become infected with HPV will not have any symptoms and will clear the infection on their own.

    I am very disturbed by this quote from the article,
    "I would like to see it that if you don't have your HPV vaccine, you can't start high school," said Juan Carlos Felix of the University of Southern California in Los Angeles, who leads the National Cervical Cancer Coalition's medical advisory panel
    To force parents and school children to comply with this is a violation of their civil liberties and just plain wrong. And we don't know what the long term side effects of this vaccine may be....

    Parents should have the choice. There are those who would say, 'We can provide a better, healthier alternative than the vaccine, and that is to teach abstinence,' " Rudd said.
    I totally agree with this position.

    For another viewpoint on the proposed "cervical cancer vaccine," please see:

    http://www.mercola.com/2002/dec/11/cervical_cancer.htm
  13. by   palesarah
    Quote from Angie O'Plasty, RN
    I have a really hard time believing that HPV is that prevalent among the population, for one thing. I believe that most women will not get infected with HPV.
    FYI, from the HPV factsheet on the CDC website:
    Approximately 20 million people are currently infected with HPV. At least 50 percent of sexually active men and women acquire genital HPV infection at some point in their lives. By age 50, at least 80 percent of women will have acquired genital HPV infection. About 6.2 million Americans get a new genital HPV infection each year.
    edited to say- oops- I posted this while VickyRN was posting the same info in a better way!
    Last edit by palesarah on Oct 31, '05
  14. by   UM Review RN
    Thanks for the education. I honestly didn't know those facts.

    I'm really frightened for the next generation.

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