Got Lefse?

  1. Since we are having an ethnic holiday food discussion....

    Any lefse lovers out there?

    Here is a picture of Lefse:

    Last edit by HM2VikingRN on Dec 18, '07
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  2. 8 Comments

  3. by   HM2VikingRN
    Aunt Charlotte's Lefse recipe
    (our favorite):
    • 4 cups riced potatoes
    • 1/4 cup butter
    • 1/2 cup heavy whipping cream
    • 2 tsp sugar
    • 1 tsp salt
    • 1 1/2 cups flour
  4. by   EricJRN
    Very interesting! I'm not familiar with it, but I'm intrigued. I found this site that has lefse links for those of us who have been missing out.

    http://www.geocities.com/heartland/a...823/lefse.html
  5. by   ElvishDNP
    Spoken like a true Norwegian, Viking!
    I've never had lefse but would be anxious to try some.
    Not too many in these parts know what it is.
  6. by   sirI
    I tried to make it once for my father. But, it didn't turn out all that good. He said it was good, but I think he was just being kind. His mor (mother) was the only person that could make them right (he said). They were o.k.
  7. by   SuesquatchRN
    Quote from HM2Viking
    Aunt Charlotte's Lefse recipe
    (our favorite):
    • 4 cups riced potatoes
    • 1/4 cup butter
    • 1/2 cup heavy whipping cream
    • 2 tsp sugar
    • 1 tsp salt
    • 1 1/2 cups flour
    So what do you do with it? Fry? Bake?

    They look like Norwegian flat potato pancakes, and are probably supposed to be similar in consistenct to the crepes that I thought were "German Pancakes" until I was about 30.
  8. by   HM2VikingRN
    expert lefse makers use a lefse griddle (a large, round electric griddle that heats up to 500 degrees), a grooved lefse rolling pin, and flat wooden lefse turners. but you don't have to buy special equipment to make lefse. you can use ordinary kitchen utensils: an electric fry pan (that heats up to 400 or 450 degrees fahrenheit), a rolling pin, a pancake turner, and a large mixing bowl. you will also need potatoes, butter or margarine, a little sugar, some milk, and flour.

    rolling lefse is a skill that requires plenty of patience and lots of practice. expert lefse makers produce pieces that are as large as the top of a snare drum and practically thin enough to read a newspaper through. my lefse, which turns out just like my mother's did, is about the size of a dinner plate and somewhat thicker.

    lefse experts recommend ricing the cooked potatoes, but my mother always mashed the potatoes. refrigerating the mashed or riced potatoes overnight makes the lefse easier to roll out.

    when you're ready to start making lefse, take the potatoes out of the refrigerator and mash or rice them again. i have one of those crisscross patterned potato mashers, and it works well for taking the lumps out of the mashed potatoes. lefse rolls out easier if the dough is cold, so make sure the potatoes are cold when you start. you may also want to refrigerate the dough for a while after you mix it. i have noticed that when i reach the end of the batch and the dough is starting to warm up, the lefse is harder to roll out.

    making a batch of lefse from this recipe takes about one and a half hours and will yield approximately two dozen pieces, depending upon how much dough you use for each one.
    source: http://ruralroute2.com/lefse.php
  9. by   SuesquatchRN
    Rolling that out sounds like an art!
  10. by   HM2VikingRN
    It is an art.....I think the greater challenge is flipping them on the griddle....

    One of the reasons lefse remains popular among Norwegian Americans is its deep linkage to when times were tough and we were the new kids on the block in America as an ethnic group....

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