Global warming will cost world $9 trillion: report

  1. The world's biggest economic evaluation of climate change says if countries do not act now the world will face a depression worse than that of the 1930s.
    The report puts the global cost of global warming and its effects at $A9 trillion - a bill greater than the combined cost of the two world wars and the Great Depression. It represents a fifth of the global economy.
    The Stern report, commissioned by the British Government, also says drought and floods could render swathes of the planet uninhabitable, turning 200 million people into refugees to create the largest migration in history.
    http://www.abc.net.au/news/newsitems...0/s1776304.htm

    I know that there are those who still disbelieve in the human impact on global warming or that there is even such a phenomena but the truth is that every day we are coming closer and closer to scientific consensus on this issue.

    The Stern report which prompted this was a careful examination of economic outcomes.

    Pray for us poor Aussies - we are already feeling the effects - tommorrow my state capital city goes on level 4 water restrictions - the reserve for our combined dams is less than 25%. The prediction is that Australia will get drier as the climate warms more.
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  2. 22 Comments

  3. by   indigo girl
    Quote from gwenith
    http://www.abc.net.au/news/newsitems...0/s1776304.htm

    I know that there are those who still disbelieve in the human impact on global warming or that there is even such a phenomena but the truth is that every day we are coming closer and closer to scientific consensus on this issue.

    The Stern report which prompted this was a careful examination of economic outcomes.

    Pray for us poor Aussies - we are already feeling the effects - tommorrow my state capital city goes on level 4 water restrictions - the reserve for our combined dams is less than 25%. The prediction is that Australia will get drier as the climate warms more.
    What happens if your situation worsens? Will they truck water in from another part of the continent?
  4. by   gwenith
    No, worse - they are going to start recylcling water

    They are already trying to get everyone to buy and install rain water tanks (20 years ago we were told to pull them out and destroy them - such is life!) We are constructing water connection piping between dams and building new dams but we stil need good old fashioned RAIN!!
  5. by   indigo girl
    Quote from gwenith
    No, worse - they are going to start recylcling water

    They are already trying to get everyone to buy and install rain water tanks (20 years ago we were told to pull them out and destroy them - such is life!) We are constructing water connection piping between dams and building new dams but we stil need good old fashioned RAIN!!
    I wonder why you were told to destroy the old rain water tanks. It would seem that anything that could allow people to be self-reliant, and to be used as an emergency back up system would have been encouraged. The fact that these things were formerly in use, seems to indicate that lack of water has been a problem in the past. I know little about your country's history regarding this. Even the new solution is dependent upon rain, and that is out of your hands.
    Your options seem limited. At least near the sea coast, they could consider desalination. In the US, the state of Florida uses recycled water including sewage, I seem to remember reading. I have noticed that you say nothing about wells being a possibility so I guess it is not feasible for some reason.

    I am blessed to live in such a water-rich place. It is hard for me to imagine your scenario, though I do not doubt that it is real. Water, and the rights to water, is a matter of considerable concern in the world today, and the situation is likely to become worse. Witness the struggle in Bolivia, where the populace had to sue to have the rights to the water in their own country returned to them from the Becktel Corp (spelling correct?). At any rate, I can understand your terrible dilemna. Are the citizens in your country involved in the decisions that are going to be made concerning such a vital issue?
    Last edit by indigo girl on Oct 31, '06
  6. by   ZASHAGALKA
    Interesting report but not based on any scientific reality but a political one: justification of the 'secret' eco-taxes that Britain is considering levying to the tune of 1300 pounds/family/yr.

    Gotta really get a political scare in to justify that.

    Happy Halloween.

    http://www.investors.com/editorial/e...47104517225260

    ~faith,
    Timothy.
  7. by   Spidey's mom
    Quote from ZASHAGALKA
    Interesting report but not based on any scientific reality but a political one: justification of the 'secret' eco-taxes that Britain is considering levying to the tune of 1300 pounds/family/yr.

    Gotta really get a political scare in to justify that.

    Happy Halloween.

    http://www.investors.com/editorial/e...47104517225260

    ~faith,
    Timothy.
    Gosh, I'm knee deep in taxes . . . . (doing the business stuff to get ready for tax time:angryfire ). Plus the matter of all those tax increase props in CA . . . . . . . .

    Thanks for the link.

    steph
  8. by   Tweety
    Wendy, I can relate. Here in Florida we are dependent on rain water. Fortunately we had a rainy season this past summer, so we're o.k. But for the years prior there were water restrictions. We've built a water desalination plant nearby to change the gulf of Mexico's salt water into usable water, but that's expensive and has it's own environmental concerns.
  9. by   gwenith
    Climate change is with us. A decade ago, it was conjecture. Now the future is unfolding before our eyes. Canada's Inuit see it in disappearing Artic Ice and permafrost. The shantytown dwellers of Latin America and Southern Asia see it in lethal storms and floods. Europeans see it in disapearing glaciers, forest fires and fatal heat waves. Scientists see it in tree rings, ancient coral and bubbles trapped in ice cores. These reveal that the world has not been as warm as it is now for a millennium or more. The three warmest years on record have all occurred since 1998; 19 of the warmest 20 since 1980. And Earth has probably never warmed as fast as in the past 30 years - a period when natural influences on global temperatures, such as solar cycles and volcanoes should have cooled us down. Studies of the thermal inertia of the oceans suggest that there is more warming in the pipeline.

    http://www.newscientist.com/channel/...d=OGFALGAEKFEE

    And we see it here in a drying and dying landscape.
  10. by   ZASHAGALKA
    Quote from gwenith
    Climate change is with us.
    Climate change is endemic to the planet. It IS with us. Just as it was with our forefathers 100 yrs ago. And 1,000. And 10,000.

    But this scare is about politics, and not actual ecological/economic conditions:

    From the Headline:

    "A report on the economics of climate change is really about politics and the need to persuade America to offer leadership on the issue"


    http://www.economist.com/agenda/disp...ory_id=8100260

    'The Economist' admits that this is wild speculation to 'scare' America into action.

    Boo!

    IF we spend money to attack global warming, we COULD inadvertently trigger an ice age that COULD cost up to $25 Trillion in future productivity. Prove me wrong. But, if there is even a 1% chance that I'm right, shouldn't we NOT spend that money?

    ~faith,
    Timothy.
    Last edit by ZASHAGALKA on Oct 31, '06
  11. by   gwenith
    Quote from ZASHAGALKA
    Interesting report but not based on any scientific reality but a political one: justification of the 'secret' eco-taxes that Britain is considering levying to the tune of 1300 pounds/family/yr.

    Gotta really get a political scare in to justify that.

    Happy Halloween.

    http://www.investors.com/editorial/e...47104517225260

    ~faith,
    Timothy.
    If these taxes are secret they must be the worst kept secret on the planet. As to the amount - that is ludicrous but let us look more closely at your source - which is interesting in that there seems to be no author - odd for an article of journalism.

    Let us look first at the charge that the "British Media" are calling this a way to levy "secret taxes"

    According to a British friend of mine the Mail is notorious for claiming "secret deals" and using hyperbole. How about the rest of the British media - seems that they are more gullible and believe Stern - or is it that Stern and others like him are actually warning that the volcano is about to erupt and we had better leave the slope NOW. You can stay if you like, but me, I am going to try and do my bit. After all it is a small ask.
  12. by   Tweety
    Timothy, certainly it might be a natural occurrence, even if we are contributing to it slightly. But unlike climate changes in the past, there are several billion people in a technilogical world and like it or not it's a political issue in the modern world.

    It's worth the gamble to take a look at it and invest some time, engery and money into the situation and prepare ourselves rather than do nothing.
    Last edit by Tweety on Nov 1, '06
  13. by   gwenith
    Quote from ZASHAGALKA
    Climate change is endemic to the planet. It IS with us. Just as it was with our forefathers 100 yrs ago. And 1,000. And 10,000.

    But this scare is about politics, and not actual ecological/economic conditions:

    From the Headline:

    "A report on the economics of climate change is really about politics and the need to persuade America to offer leadership on the issue"


    http://www.economist.com/agenda/disp...ory_id=8100260

    'The Economist' admits that this is wild speculation to 'scare' America into action.

    Boo!

    IF we spend money to attack global warming, we COULD inadvertently trigger an ice age that COULD cost up to $25 Trillion in future productivity. Prove me wrong. But, if there is even a 1% chance that I'm right, shouldn't we NOT spend that money?

    ~faith,
    Timothy.
    But this is about the Stern report - commissioned by the British Goverment for the British Goverment. It is about what they have to do themselves - scaring America was not the goal.

    In positing an ice age if we act now you are introducing a strawman argument.

    We have scientific consensus on this - if we do not act now we are in deep trouble.
  14. by   ZASHAGALKA
    Quote from gwenith
    But this is about the Stern report - commissioned by the British Goverment for the British Goverment. It is about what they have to do themselves - scaring America was not the goal.

    In positing an ice age if we act now you are introducing a strawman argument.

    We have scientific consensus on this - if we do not act now we are in deep trouble.
    There isn't a scientific consensus on this. There is a strong armed tactic to declare that there is in order to stifle debate. Real science encourages debate, it doesn't try to cut it off. That is a political purpose.

    I don't think it IS a straw-man argument, or at least, not any MORE SO then the argument I'm countering. That was my WHOLE point - that such estimates are specious, at best.

    There is no proof whatsoever to the claim that if we don't act now, we are in big trouble. Even if there were a consensus, which there isn't, consensus is not proof. There was once a scientific consensus that the world was flat. 50 yrs ago, there was a scientific consensus that we are risking global COOLING by our actions.

    ~faith,
    Timothy.
    Last edit by ZASHAGALKA on Nov 1, '06

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