George W. Bush has presided over an execution in Texas almost every two weeks

  1. I clearly remember the current President while campaigning stating, "I am not concerned an innocent man was executed in Texas during my governorship. The were all convicted."

    This in response to evidence that 13 death row inmates in Illinois were proven innocent by DNA testing and evidence that at least three of the accused attorneys slept through most of the trial.

    Being pro life this concerns me.

    http://dir.salon.com/politics2000/fe...ath/index.html
    http://dir.salon.com/news/feature/19...ath/index.html
    http://www.cuadp.org/bush.html
    Execution
    George W. Bush has presided over an execution in Texas almost every two weeks since his election. Why isn't that a campaign issue?

    By Christopher Hitchens

    August 07, 1999 | I n rather the same way as new movies are now "reviewed" in terms of their first weekend gross, new candidates have become subject to evaluation by the dimensions of their "war chest." This silly archaic expression defines other equally vapid terms like "credibility" and "electability" and "name recognition," which become subliminally attached to it.

    In many cases, the crude cash-flow measure is as useful in deciding on a politician as it is in making a choice at the multiplex; you might as well see the worthless movie that everyone else has seen, or express an interest in the unbearably light "front runner," so as not to be left out of the national "conversation."

    The hidden costs, alas, include a complete erosion of the critical faculties. I am as enthralled as the next person by the sheaves of money assembled for George Walker Bush. </news/feature/1999/05/06/bush/index.html> (What did he do to be shorn at birth of his Herbert?) But I'm even more fascinated by the fact that, as I write, he is about to sign his 93rd death > warrant. There was an execution on the day of his inauguration as governor of Texas, which I don't count, and there has been one every two and a half weeks or so ever since.

    </news/feature/1999/07/21/bush/index.html

    Part of a governor's job is to review capital cases. The staggering pace of executions in Texas means that Bush has either a) been doing little else but reviewing death sentences or b) been signing death warrants as fast as they can be put in front of him.

    This may also be helping him gain some of that much needed "foreign policy experience" about which the pundits have made the occasional frown. State officials from the Philippines and Guatemala have been touring lethal chambers in the United States as part of their research into improved methods, and according to Amnesty International a Filipino official was allowed to watch a killing in Texas in 1997.

    The thorny question of race -- always such a minefield for the aspiring Republican candidate -- also gets a workout by this means. Many people remember the case of Karla Faye Tucker, the born-again pickax-murderess who showed -- at least by the standard of Christian fundamentalism -- signs of having been rehabilitated. Gov. Bush snuffed her in February of last year, over the protests of Pat Robertson and others.

    But had he commuted her sentence, he would have been faced with executing a black woman, Erica Sheppard, who was next in line on the female death row and had foregone her appeal. . (Sheppard has since recovered her determination to appeal, and recently took part in a protest against the strip-searching of female inmates in front of male guards, another distinguishing feature of the Texas criminal justice system.)
    •  
  2. 18 Comments

  3. by   Dplear
    Many people remember the case of Karla Faye Tucker, the born-again pickax-murderess who showed -- at least by the standard of Christian fundamentalism -- signs of having been rehabilitated. Gov. Bush snuffed her in February of last year, over the protests of Pat Robertson and others.

    As A Proud Texan I am happy that we use the death penalty inthis state. It is a deterrent. That is one less criminal I have to think about ever being on the street again. As flor Karla Faye Tucker, she was hiding behind her "religion" to avoid her sentance. Rememeber that this lady stabbed a guy 17 times with the pickaxe and she said that she orgasmed every time it went in. Tell me she was "rehabilitated". Yeah right

    Dave
    Last edit by Dplear on Feb 13, '04 : Reason: really crappy keyboard
  4. by   SmilingBluEyes
    Quote from Dplear
    As A Proud Texan I am happy that we use the death penalty inthis state. It is a deterrent. That is one less criminal I have to think about ever being on the street again. As flor Karla Faye Tucker, she was hiding behind her "religion" to avoid her sentance. Rememeber that this lady stabbed a guy 17 times with the pickaxe and she said that she orgasmed every time it went in. Tell me she was "rehabilitated". Yeah right

    Dave
    I am NOT pro-death penalty and DO NOT believe it's a deterrant to crime, except in the very crude sense you state here. But I am with you on the Karla Faye Tucker thing. I don't believe monsters like that are rehab'ed either, and their claims of "finding religion" are hard for me to ever take seriously.
  5. by   fergus51
    I am not in favor of the death penalty, but can't fault Bush on this one politically. The majority of Texans believe in it and that's who he was responsible to.
  6. by   pickledpepperRN
    I am concerned that he was certain that no innocent person was ever convicted.

    Although I would recuse myself from a case with the possibility of the death penalth based on my personal and religious beliefs when an admitted killer is put to death I do not grieve.
    Just last week in the Kevin Cooper situation I wrote the Governot asking for the DNA testing be completed, not for clemancy.

    I think life without parole needs to be just that. NO PAROLE! Dangerous killers and rapists must NOT be free.
  7. by   SmilingBluEyes
    Quote from spacenurse
    I am concerned that he was certain that no innocent person was ever convicted.

    I think life without parole needs to be just that. NO PAROLE! Dangerous killers and rapists must NOT be free.
    I am too

    but my question: where do we HOUSE THESE MONSTERS and how do we PAY FOR IT??????

    we are broke as it is, budget wise. and people like me are NOT really eager to pay even more for their upkeep. Their needs are NOT my priority, I will admit. NO I do NOT condone abuses, but I they arenot at the top of my list of things/issues to spend money on here.

    Let's face it: life w/o possiblity of parole means $$$$$ to the community that houses them. There is NO corrective custody going on here. If even if they WERE TO get out, (and do, as in the case of Carlie Brucia's killer), it's often as even more cunning, violent and worse criminals then when they got in. But somebody's got to pay for it if we house them for life. Who?
    Last edit by SmilingBluEyes on Feb 13, '04
  8. by   fergus51
    Deb, it is actually cheaper to incarcerate someone for 25 years than to execute them. The main reason is that guards are cheaper than lawyers/juges and in order to safeguard against innocent people being executed we have to have a fairly lengthy appeals process. We literally have to spend millions to execute one man.
  9. by   fergus51
  10. by   Jrnalist2RNinOR
    I have to admit - I think there are people that have done things that are so horrible sometimes that they should be eliminated from society - there is no use spending money on them feeding them - I know it may cost more to put that needle in their arm and kill them - but I can think of some clever ways that would save money there...and most of them that deserve the death penalty at that point I really dont think deserve a humane death...
  11. by   a_clay
    Quote from spacenurse
    George W. Bush has presided over an execution in Texas almost every two weeks since his election. Why isn't that a campaign issue?

    As a Texan I must inform you that this had been happening on long before Bush became president!
  12. by   BarbPick
    I spend a whole lot of time speaking about the death penalty from the Forensics to the procedures. Which state has what. It is a major curiosoty in the country. I rarely give my opinion. I posted about a coincidence between OJ Simpson's trial and the California Execution put on hold the begining of this week, both fates of life or death comes down to a lab test from a lavender top tube.
    Here is my stand : you look and you search and you find out every speck of evidence and do every test you can during the 10 years of appeals.
    In Oklahoma, a woman by the name of Joyce Gilcrist, a Criminalist sent many to their death on her one say so. Her say so's have been wrong. The FBI is double testing every call and identification she has ever made.
  13. by   2ndCareerRN
    Am I missing something here???? These articles are from 1999 and early 2000.

    Are you infering that this has a direct bearing on current events? How many executions has Bush presided over in the federal justice system since taking office?

    My feelings on the death penalty.... Rehabilitation through Reincarnation!!

    bob
  14. by   BarbPick
    Quote from 2ndCareerRN
    Am I missing something here???? These articles are from 1999 and early 2000.

    Are you infering that this has a direct bearing on current events? How many executions has Bush presided over in the federal justice system since taking office?

    My feelings on the death penalty.... Rehabilitation through Reincarnation!!

    bob
    He has not presided over any federal executions, why I have no idea, he did them in Texas for sport.
    His brother, Jeb Boy, had through reviews of all possible options before he signed a death warrent. (I live in Florida). Any chance of DNA testing, the whole bit.
    GW did not look into one single death sentence ( or have his staff).

Must Read Topics


close