Enemies abroad -- and at home

  1. Enemies abroad -- and at home
    Mark Alexander
    May 16, 2003

    The battles on the Iraq front in our continuing war with Jihadistan are concluding -- successfully, we should add -- but a reminder this week that Iraq is but one of many fronts with Jihadi terrorists.

    So why are the Jihadis attacking, when their major complaint of U.S. troops in their holy land is diminishing with U.S. force relocations? In essence, they are doing the Jihadi equivalent of politicians finding a parade and running to the head of it. If al-Qa'ida operatives are capable of mounting an offensive while the U.S. and coalition partners are drawing down their force numbers, they can claim they forced the withdrawal -- although the clear interest of the U.S. is to do so with or without the threat of attacks.

    The war with Jihadistan continues to be a manhunt, picking off the attackers as they come up for air from the ratholes where they take refuge. "The best way to protect the homeland," President Bush affirmed, "is to track down these killers one by one and bring them to justice. That's the policy of the Bush administration." Vice President Dick Cheney added, "The only way to deal with this [terrorist] threat ultimately is to destroy it. There's no treaty that can solve this problem. There's no peace agreement, no policy of containment or deterrence that works to deal with this threat."

    http://www.townhall.com/columnists/m...20030516.shtml

    There is no peace agreement with terrorists, we have hunt them down.

    Mr. Alexander brings up an interesting point in his article-- The U.S. forces are diminishing in the holy land and now the terrorists attacks surface.

    I think al-aqaeda was in Iraq and had planned horrific attacks on our troops and now the cells have dispersed.
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  2. 19 Comments

  3. by   Mkue
    'The Real Deal'
    by Joe Scarborough
    May 15, 2003

    The State Department reported last month that 2002 had the least reported incidents of terrorism since the U.S. government began gathering such statistics 30 years ago. And while the Pentagon was feverishly planning for the invasion of Iraq, America bagged a number of Al Qaida leaders, including the March arrest of Khalid Shaik Mohammed, the mastermind of the September 11th attacks on America. The Feds have also captured or killed other terror leaders, wiped out al-Qaida's infrastructure, and stopped the launching of hundreds of attacks.

    This proved once again that George W. Bush could crack down on al-Qaida, while freeing the people of Iraq.

    entire article: http://www.townhall.com/columnists/j...20030515.shtml


    Al-Qaida is still active, as we've seen this week. But look what we've accomplished so far.
  4. by   pickledpepperRN
    The above article written March 16, 2003 is also against the ban on assault weapons. He seems to think we would be safer from terrorists (9/11 type) if more Americans were armed.
    Seems I remember that many many Iraqi homes had firearms and ammunition. Why did they not rise up against SH?

    What have we accomplished so far?
    Last edit by pickledpepperRN on May 17, '03
  5. by   Mkue
    Originally posted by mkue
    'The Real Deal'
    by Joe Scarborough
    May 15, 2003

    America bagged a number of Al Qaida leaders, including the March arrest of Khalid Shaik Mohammed, the mastermind of the September 11th attacks on America. The Feds have also captured or killed other terror leaders, wiped out al-Qaida's infrastructure, and stopped the launching of hundreds of attacks.

    But look what we've accomplished so far.
    I think this explains the point I'm trying to make with this article concerning the war on terrorism. Many have been captured, as President Bush stated we would go after them and hunt them down.

    Many people are not aware of what has been accomplished so far and what we continue to do.
  6. by   Furball
    Correct-o! Everyday we hear about this terrorist and that terrorist bring found and jailed. Who knows haw many plots we have foiled? OMG, reading too many mystery novels!
  7. by   pickledpepperRN
    Good to stop those who are plotting terrorist acts. Seems the "smart" bombs, cluster bombs, depleted uranium and such did not do it. The al Quida were not captured in Iraq.

    You are right about what we accomplished.

    How did being armed help the Iraqi people?
  8. by   kmchugh
    Double posted
    Last edit by kmchugh on May 18, '03
  9. by   kmchugh
    Originally posted by spacenurse
    Seems I remember that many many Iraqi homes had firearms and ammunition. Why did they not rise up against SH?...

    How did being armed help the Iraqi people?

    Source, please. I'm not necessarily saying you are wrong, but regimes like that of SH tend to be very careful about who does and does not possess firearms. This is the first I've heard about numerous Iraqi homes having firearms.


    Originally posted by spacenurse
    Good to stop those who are plotting terrorist acts. Seems the "smart" bombs, cluster bombs, depleted uranium and such did not do it. The al Quida were not captured in Iraq.

    You are right about what we accomplished.
    No other way to say it, this statement is simply incorrect. No one said winning the war on Iraq would be the END of terrorism. But, through that effort, we found and eliminated an Al Qaida training camp, captured Abu Abbas, and captured a member of the senior leadership of Al Qaida. (All of which we were told by some did not exist in Iraq.) We also eliminated a regime that supported anti-US terrorism. Not to mention the fact that all the terrorist training camps in Iraq and Afghanistan have been closed for business. We are reducing the number of places where terrorists can train, where they can hide, where they can go for "R&R." I'd say that the smart bombs, DU munitions, and cluster bombs accomplished exactly what we wanted them to.

    Kevin McHugh
  10. by   pickledpepperRN
    http://www.csmonitor.com/2003/0310/p01s03-woiq.html
    Iraqi public well-armed and wary
    Iraqi civilians are dusting off their firearms, constructing oil-filled
    trenches and preparing for civil unrest.
    By Scott Peterson | Staff writer of The Christian Science Monitor
    BAGHDAD, IRAQ - With a gun culture that closely resembles that of
    the United States, Iraq is one of the most heavily armed societies in
    the world. Its tradition of self-reliance and hard desert and mountain
    living puts it on a gun-per-person level rivaling other clan systems in
    Yemen or Somalia.

    As US military strategists look ahead to a possible war in Iraq - and
    a postwar period of working with the Iraqi people to establish more
    representative rule - firearms loom large. What Iraqis do with those
    weapons if the US launches an invasion will determine success or
    failure for Washington. Most war plans, including a United Nations
    postwar contingency plan leaked in New York last week, assume a
    swift fall of the regime, and little Iraqi resistance.
    -------------------
    http://www.newsmax.com/archives/arti...5/192247.shtml
    Rumsfeld: New Rules for Non-lethal Combat

    Phil Brennan, NewsMax
    Thursday, Feb. 6, 2003 ...
    War with Iraq raises the uncomfortable prospect that American
    troops might end up fighting armed Iraqi civilians in cities.
    -------------------
    http://www.bbc.co.uk/bbcthree/news/t...aq260303.shtml


    I am wrong.
    It just seemed to me that Cluster bombs and the other thousands of bombs did not capture anyone.
    Did they kill terrorists who would have killed more innocent people than our collateral damage did?
    Beats me.
    Last edit by pickledpepperRN on May 26, '03
  11. by   pickledpepperRN
    One mans opinion in ABC letter to station:

    Subject: What links Al Quida and Iraq?

    I heard a media commentator pontificate that the world is waiting for the link between Iraq and Al Quida.
    I heard Donald Rumsfeld suggesting that the CIA may have found a link. I nearly exploded with laughter.

    He is the link. He helped set up Al quida and travelled to Iraq and sold dodgy stuff to Saddam for Ronnie and George. I would be pissing myself with laughter
    except some poor bastard is gonna get bombed
    ---------------------Original article is at http://southafrica.indymedia.org/news/2003/03/3269.php

    OSAMA WAS NOT OUR CREATION, CLAIMS RUMSFELD
    by Rosalinda * Saturday March 08, 2003 at 06:56 AM

    There were many different factions involved in the ``war of liberation'' in Afghanistan against the Soviet Union, Rumsfeld said. That
    included Osama bin Laden. But he flatly denied that Osama was a creation of the United States to be used against the Soviet Union,
    an issue which has undoubtedly been dogging him ever since the events of 911.


    [Source: Afghanistan Today, March 1]

    OSAMA WAS NOT OUR CREATION, CLAIMS RUMSFELD,
    RESPONDING TO A QUESTION FROM AL JAZEERA.

    Secretary of Defense Donald Rumsfeld
    was charged with responsibility for Osama Bin Laden because of
    the U.S. creation of the mujaheddin during the ``surrogate war''
    against the Soviets in Afghanistan. There were many different
    factions involved in the ``war of liberation'' in Afghanistan
    against the Soviet Union, Rumsfeld said. That included Osama bin
    Laden. But he flatly denied that Osama was a creation of the
    United States to be used against the Soviet Union, an issue which
    has undoubtedly been dogging him ever since the events of 911.

    [Source: ``A Clean Break: A New Strategy for Securing the
    Realm,'' by Richard Perle, James Colbert, Charles Fairbanks,
    Douglas Feith, Robert Loewenberg, Jonathan Torop, David Wurmser,
    Meyrav Wurmser, IASPS, July 8, 1996.]

    PERLE AND FEITH'S ``CLEAN BREAK'' DOCUMENT FROM 1996
    SPELLED OUT CURRENT WAR SCHEMES IN MIDEAST.

    The ``Clean Break'' strategy of Richard Perle, Doug Feith, et al.
    have reached critical mass, with much of the leading press in the
    English- and Arabic-speaking world exposing this IASPS (Institute
    for Advanced Strategic and Political Studies) document as the
    basis for the entire utopian/chickenhawk war drive in the Middle
    East, coming from both within the Bush Administration and the
    Sharon regime.

    On July 8, 1996, Richard Perle
    hand-delivered a copy of ``A Clean Break: A New Strategy for
    Securing the Realm,'' to incoming Israeli Prime Minister and
    rabid Jabotinskyite Benjamin Netanyahu.

    Two days later, Netanyahu
    dutifully delivered a speech before a joint session of the U.S.
    Congress, drawn largely from the Perle-delivered text.

    Several
    excerpts from the six-page ``Clean Break'' memo serve as a useful
    reminder of just how much this insane schema has driven Mideast
    events since the Bush and Sharon inaugurations in 2001.

    On the Israeli relationship with the Palestinian Authority:

    ``Israel can... Change the nature of its relations with the
    Palestinians, including upholding the {right of hot pursuit} for
    self defense into all Palestinian areas and nurturing
    alternatives to Arafat's exclusive grip on Palestinian society...
    Israel has no obligations under the Oslo agreements if the PLO
    does not fulfill its obligations.''

    And: ``Early adoption of a bold, new perspective on peace
    and security is imperative for the new prime minister. While the
    previous government, and many abroad, may emphasize `land for
    peace'--which placed Israel in the position of cultural,
    economic, political, diplomatic, and military retreat--the new
    government can promote Western values and traditions. Such an
    approach, which will be well received in the United States,
    includes `peace for peace,' `peace through strength,' and self
    reliance: {the balance of power}.''

    On the priority to overthrow Saddam Hussein: ``Israel can
    shape its strategic environment, in cooperation with Turkey and
    Jordan, by weakening, containing, and even rolling back Syria.
    This effort can focus on removing Saddam Hussein from power in
    Iraq--an important Israeli strategic objective in its own
    right--as a means of foiling Syria's regional ambitions. Jordan
    has challenged Syria's regional ambitions recently by suggesting
    the restoration of the Hashemites in Iraq.''

    While the Perle gang's schemes to promote a conflict among
    the Arab nations, by pushing a Hashemite versus House of Saud
    rift, have hardly been a resounding success, the idea of hot
    pursuit reinvasion of the Palestinian territories and the top
    priority of overthrowing Saddam Hussein has certainly been the
    cornerstone of the Sharon and chickenhawk policies.

    (The full text of Clean Break and other related IASPS studies
    can be found at http://www.israeleconomy.org)
  12. by   pickledpepperRN
    I apologise for my error.
    Abu Abbas was a member of the PLO not Al Quida.

    Not questiong your facts. Just asking:
    What member of senior Al Quida leadership did we find and eliminate?
    Last edit by pickledpepperRN on May 18, '03
  13. by   Mkue
    -- Usama bin Laden (Saudi-Yemeni): unknown

    -- Ayman al-Zawahri, second-in-command (Egyptian): unknown

    -- Mohammed Atef, military commander (Egyptian): killed by airstrike

    Terrorist and military operational chiefs:

    -- Abu Zubaydah (Palestinian-Saudi): captured

    -- Abd al-Rahim al-Nashiri, Persian Gulf operations chief (Saudi): unknown

    -- Abu Musab Zarqawi (Jordanian): fled to Iran from Afghanistan

    -- Abu Zubair al-Haili: unknown

    -- Tawfiq Attash Khallad (Yemeni): unknown

    -- Zaid Khayr: unknown

    -- Mohammad Salah (Egyptian): killed by airstrike

    -- Tariq Anwar al-Sayyid Ahmad (Egyptian): killed by airstrike

    Bin Laden's security chiefs:

    -- Saif al-Adil (Egyptian): unknown

    -- Amin al-Haq (Afghan): unknown

    Religious-legal scholarship:

    -- Abu Hafs the Mauritanian (Mauritanian): killed

    Afghan training camp commanders:

    -- Abu Mohammad al-Masri, aka Abdullah Ahmed Abdullah (Egyptian): unknown

    -- Ibn Al-Shaykh al-Libi (Libyan): captured

    -- Abd al-Hadi al-Iraqi: captured

    Al Qaeda finances and logistics:

    -- Shaikh Saiid, aka Mustafa Ahmed al-Hisawi (Saudi): unknown

    -- Abu Jafar al-Jaziri: killed

    -- Abu Salah al-Yemeni: killed

    -- Abdul Rahim Riyadh: captured

    -- Ahmad Said al-Kadr (Egyptian-Canadian): unknown

    -- Hamza al-Qatari: killed

    Public relations:

    -- Sulaiman Abu Ghaith (Kuwaiti): unknown

    Weapons of mass destruction research:

    -- Midhat Mursi (Egyptian): unknown

    Aides/other lieutenants:

    -- Abu Basir al-Yemeni (Yemeni): unknown

    -- Abd al-Aziz al-Jamal: unknown

    -- Bilal bin Marwan (Saudi): unknown

    -- Saqar al-Jadawi (Yemeni-Saudi): unknown

    -- Mohammad Omar Abdel-Rahman (Egyptian): unknown

    -- Ahmad Omar Abdel-Rahman (Egyptian): captured

    ____________________________________________

    As of April 1, 2003
  14. by   Mkue
    www.fbi.gov/mostwant/terrorists/fugitives.htm

    22 Most Wanted Terrorists on the FBI website.

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