Doctors deliver baby on Delta flight

  1. ATLANTA - Two doctors on a Delta Air Lines flight from Germany delivered a baby in the aisle of the plane and resuscitated him when he wasn't breathing, officials said.

    Delta Flight 131 to Atlanta was over the Washington area when a woman about 32 to 36 weeks-or nine months-pregnant went into labor Wednesday afternoon, prompting...
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    http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap_travel/20...ef_plane_birth
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  2. 8 Comments

  3. by   SmilingBluEyes
    Wow good thing there was help. But rather stupid to fly that late in pregnancy, if you ask me.
  4. by   Jolie
    Thank goodness the docs were present and willing to assist. What a good example of how airway management will usually suffice to resuscitate a newborn. The article states that she was 32-36 weeks along, which I doubt, given that she had a 7 lb. baby. Sounds like she "fudged" her dates a bit in order to fly. She's lucky it turned out well!
  5. by   smk1
    she must not have had early prenatal care because everyone i know can tell you the exact weekand number of days they are. (the same people also really think they have a due date instead of a due time though...)
  6. by   swartzrn
    the weight of the baby was good. I am surprised they let her fly as well. I know when I was about 28 weeks my doctor told me NO flying. We'd planned a trip to visit family in Arizona and we didn't get to go. But, of course, I was a high risk pregnancy so he may have grounded me before he normally would women with normal pregnancies. The angels were definately on the side of this little one. Sounds like a pretty scary time.
    I think she fudged how far along she was also or else she just didn't know. I had a baby at 35 weeks that weighed 6 pounds 4 ounces but dropped an entire pound within the first couple of days and that weight was GOOD for a baby at that gestational age. They'd told me to expect a 4-5 pound baby at that point.
    All turned out well and that is so good. Thank God that there were people on board who knew what to do. I am a firm believer that every person (including teenagers) who are physically able to perform adult and infant CPR should be trained and certified. You never know when you might need to use it.
  7. by   walkingrock
    the "facts" are kinda sketchy...32-36 wks, or about 9 months??? those don't add up, plus 32 to 36 is a 4 wk spread, quite a lot of difference there...7 lbs is a good wt for 36 wks even...and one place i read it was a boy, and another article said it was a girl ??
  8. by   swartzrn
    I read the 32-36 weeks and then the "about 9 months" part and the only think I could think of is that the writer doesn't realize pregnancy is 40 weeks and only divided 4 weeks into 36 months came up with 9 months. I think alot of people do that.
  9. by   Roy Fokker
    This was incredibly risky all the way through. I'm glad the little one made it through ok.

    The other thing that this article reinforces in my mind is the attitude of the general public that "health care workers" (especially "Doctors" :uhoh21: )ought to "know what to do" given any situation!

    Kinda (unrealistic) and scary, if you ask me!!!

    Quote from swartzrn
    I am a firm believer that every person (including teenagers) who are physically able to perform adult and infant CPR should be trained and certified. You never know when you might need to use it.
    I actually agree.

    Despite statistics about poor recoveries from CPR in the field by lay persons and what not (especially contrary to the BS presented on TV) --- I don't honestly think it can "hurt". Even a 'rudimentary' knowledge of ABCs is better than 'none' at all.


    cheers,
  10. by   indigo girl
    A pediatric cardiologist and an adult cardiologist delivered this baby?
    Way to go docs!

    Thank goodness for the safe delivery for both mom and baby.

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