Dinasaur Breath Stinks

  1. Just now, while moderating a thread or two here, a question popped into my head: What does Dinosaur breath smell like??? Well, by golly, there's a company that exists that deals with exotic aromas which has answered this most urgent question!!! This company is called Dale Air. Not only did they "research" this smell, they duplicated it! Other smells duplicated by this most unique company are 1) Dead Roman Soldier's Armpit, 2) Jaguar urine, 3) Viking Loo, and that all time favorite, 4) Changing Room. Other companies and organizations actually hire Dale Air to produce that "just right" odor to help make a project that much more authentic and life-like.

    Oooo Kayyyyyy. . . .

    I'm at work tonight. Have two patients who are soundly sleeping with their hearts a-beatin'. One of them has been a bit -- (how shall I put it) -- gassy. Don't think I need to call Dale Air and purchase a special odor tonight. (Pun intended! ) I'm getting it for free! And folks, certain things that are for free just ain't worth the price.

    Well, back to moderating (in between the call bells, of course). Wonder what what question will pop into my simple mind next. . . .



    Ted
    _______________________________

    http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/5327029/?GT1=4244

    Experts re-create
    stinky dinosaur breath


    Small company specializes
    in offbeat historical scents


    To create the scent of a dinosaur, Dale Air specialists talked with paleontologists about the likely diet and health of Tyrannosaurus rex.

    By Alexandra Hudson

    Updated: 6:35 p.m. ET June 29, 2004


    KIRKHAM, England - Ordinary smells, Dale Air can do-but the breath of a Tyrannosaurus rex?

    "Where do you start?" asked Frank Knight, director of the small British firm that specializes in "themed aromas."

    Most of the smells it creates, like "Granny's Kitchen" or "Burnt Wood," are designed to enhance museum visits or call up long-lost memories.

    Re-creating the breath of a T. rex for a huge model dinosaur in London's Natural History Museum posed challenges all of their own.

    "We spoke to paleontologists, who gave us a description of the dinosaur. Basically, the bigger the creature, the smellier they were," said Knight, who is passionate about accuracy. "The dinosaurs would have had open sores from fighting, and rotting meat stuck in the gaps between their teeth. We needed all these features in the eventual odor."

    The T. rex breath turned out to be so revolting that the curators instead opted for a milder swamp smell to evoke the creature's natural habitat.

    Nasty smells are popular
    Requests for nasty smells come in quite a lot, requiring some unpleasant research.

    "I've had otter poo on my desk," said Knight, who created the odor for a zoo's nature trail, alongside the smell of jaguar urine and rotting flesh.

    Some jobs are easier on the nose. Dale Air has supplied branches of British travel agent chain Lunn Poly with the scent of coconut oil, aimed at increasing the time customers spend in their stores.

    The smell of money
    Dale Air started life as an air-freshener firm. Then founder Fred Dale, who died earlier this year, discovered a lucrative sideline. He was invited to mix familiar odors from the 1920s for use in retirement homes. These triggered memories and encouraged conversation among elderly residents.

    Dale never looked back.

    Soon museums were commissioning smells such as Dead Roman Soldier's Armpit and Viking Loo.

    "My mum used to say that she never knew who she would be going to bed with-a horse, or a bear ... as the smells used to linger on my dad's skin," said Fred's son Robert.

    Fred Dale's favorite project was the Jorvik Centre museum in York, which opened in 1984, boasting Viking smells as its key attraction. Authentic historical smells have since become a much copied feature.

    Sarah Maltby, head of visitor attractions at Jorvik, said: "Competition is such nowadays you have to think how you can capture the imagination of your visitors, and thinking of how to capture all the senses is one of the things you have to do."

    Costly frankincense
    Dale Air's most expensive smell to date is frankincense, mixed for a Queen of Sheba exhibition at the British museum. A kilo of the scent lasting for a year cost $275.70 (150 pounds).

    The firm's team of perfumers identified the chemical components of the smell and mixed up a replica potion.

    Most aromas are supplied as liquids and pumped out through various dispensers. A new model still being tested can fill a 250-seat theater. Knight thinks cinemas may also one day waft appropriate scents through the auditorium, but said they should be cautious.

    "You've got to give people choice. We don't like forcing aromas on people-and you don't want people going to the cinema and not knowing what they'll encounter."

    However, people can use their sense of smell to their advantage, and there are some interesting applications.

    The firm is testing an aroma dispenser that plugs into a computer and is controlled from the keyboard.

    "Say you've got help desk staff who are getting tense and frustrated-they can press a button to get an aroma to help calm them down," Knight said.

    Most of the firm's smells, such as the "aromas of football" set, are for pure entertainment.

    Smells as entertainment
    "Footie Pitch" smells of grass, "Trophy Room" smells of wood polish, "Half Time" smells of pies, and "Changing Room" smells of liniment, giving the overzealous football fan or club shop an authentic whiff of the beautiful game.

    Knight points out that football pitches are rarely mown the day of a match, so the smell of freshly cut grass won't do.

    "That's how realistic we are-we find out when they cut the grass."
    Last edit by Ted on Jul 1, '04
    •  
  2. 18 Comments

  3. by   leslie :-D
    with all due respect ted, that article stinks! who nose what you'll come up with next?

    leslie
  4. by   Ted
    Quote from earle58
    with all due respect ted, that article stinks! who nose what you'll come up with next?

    leslie


    Yea. . . But would YOU place an odor from Dale Air?? Other people have!

    :chuckle

    Ted
    Last edit by Ted on Jul 1, '04
  5. by   pickledpepperRN
    O imagine a T-REX would have more offensive breath than an allosaurous because carnivores tend to smell worse than herbivores.

    The smart plain spoken older man I have quoted on this forum smells of aftershave & arthritis rub.
  6. by   pickledpepperRN
    I better post some links. Sorry I don't have one for our neighborhood 'character'.

    How bad can a science job get?

    http://www.popsci.com/popsci/science...53-1%2C00.html

    -----------------------------------------------------------
    Meat Stinks!
    How to avoid farts, flatus, gas, nasty odor, body odor, cancer by not eating meat

    http://www.food-health-fitness-vacat...ug02-meat.html
    -----------------------------------------------------------
    Bad breath in cows is contributing to global warming, researchers ... here I thought it was cow flatus! 12 posted on ... but could have targeted the wrong animal?
    http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-news/929205/posts
  7. by   Ted
    Spacenurse. That "smart plain spoken older man" that you quoted sure smells of something, that's for sure!

    :chuckle

    Ted
  8. by   leslie :-D
    agree. i smell a rat. but then again, i have no common scents.
  9. by   pickledpepperRN
    http://www.eletra.com/eandco/e_article000016014.cfm

    Pigs=Fuel for this Small Business
    Spotlight on: The VAC Company, Vietnam

    In the mid 1990's Oxfam Quebec, an NGO, began a small program in Vietnam to promote the use of household biodigesters. Many Vietnamese farmers (under the nationally promoted concept of developing a combination of horticulture/animal husbandry and aquaculture) have a small number of pigs (and other animals) that they keep housed in farm buildings. Typically the wastes from the piggeries have been allowed to discharge into surface waterways and are a significant source of atmospheric and water pollution.

    The Oxfam program provided an opportunity to introduce a simple system, low in cost, and easy to operate and maintain, that offers a substitute fuel for cooking - methane gas. Although such systems (using animal waste) are in widespread use in China, India and Nepal, those units are more complex and require a moderately sophisticated construction process.
    (link has diagrams and details)
  10. by   pickledpepperRN
    In fragrant violation of good taste, putrid puns have become the odor of the night!

    Ted scent this thread to sniff us out. It makes no odoriferous so long as you have a smell on your face.
  11. by   Ted
    Quote from spacenurse
    In fragrant violation of good taste, putrid puns have become the odor of the night!

    Ted scent this thread to sniff us out. It makes no odoriferous so long as you have a smell on your face.

    Bad Spacenurse. . . Real, Real FOUL PLAY! O Pun the door! Please!

  12. by   pickledpepperRN
    Scientists have come up with a new measure of smelliness for gasses: they calculate how many molecules are scented within each breath of gas.

    The results are on shown the "per fume" scale.

    Which door to open? They both have notes
    On a Music Teacher's door: "Out Chopin."
    On the door of a Music Library: "Bach in a min-u-et."
    Last edit by pickledpepperRN on Jul 2, '04
  13. by   nekhismom
    Oh yuck!! The T-rex breath was bad enough, and it keeps getting worse!! Thanks, Ted, for "offending" our sense of smell!
  14. by   Ted
    Quote from nekhismom
    Oh yuck!! The T-rex breath was bad enough, and it keeps getting worse!! Thanks, Ted, for "offending" our sense of smell!


    Everyone nose that those dinos can be real sores!

    Ted






    Apologies for my week attempt at punning around. . . :imbar


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