Denver Fans Walk Out of Pearl Jam Show

  1. From Yahoo:

    DENVER - Dozens of fans walked out of a Pearl Jam concert after lead singer Eddie Vedder (news) took a mask of President Bush (news - web sites) and impaled it on a microphone stand.

    Several concertgoers booed and shouted Tuesday night for Vedder to shut up as he told the crowd he was against the war and Bush. He impaled the mask during the encore of the band's opening show of a U.S. tour.

    "It was like he decapitated someone in a primal ritual and stuck their head on a stick," fan Keith Zimmerman said.

    Vedder used a Bush mask in Australia and Japan to perform the song "Bushleaguer," from the band's latest album, "Riot Act." The song's lyrics say, "He's not a leader, he's a Texas leaguer."

    During the show, Vedder said: "Just to clarify... we support the troops."

    "We're just confused on how wanting to bring them back safely all of a sudden becomes non-support," he said. "We love them. They're not the ones who make the foreign policy .... Let's hope for the best and speak our opinions."

    Pearl Jam manager Kelly Curtis could not immediately be reached for comment Thursday.
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  2. 29 Comments

  3. by   sanakruz
    Your point?
  4. by   Gomer
    Originally posted by Tilleycs
    From Yahoo:

    DENVER - Dozens of fans walked out of a Pearl Jam concert...
    ...during the encore of the band's opening show of a U.S. tour.

    Isn't an encore at the end of a program? As in, the program is over and the artist is brought back on stage for an "encore". Maybe those fans who walked out did so at the end of the concert???
  5. by   Mkue
    Ah, they were exercising their right to protest and doing it in a civil manner by just walking out.

    Sometimes actions speak louder than words..

    Thank you
  6. by   sbic56
    Originally posted by Gomer
    Isn't an encore at the end of a program? As in, the program is over and the artist is brought back on stage for an "encore". Maybe those fans who walked out did so at the end of the concert???
    Aha! Indeed, encore does mean the show was over! Have to give the Bush fan credit for trying, though...I almost missed that part.

    Pearl Jam made a thoughtful statement re: troop support, IMO.
  7. by   NurseDennie
    How is this pertinent? The people aren't going to walk out until something happens that offends them, are they?

    Love
    Dennie
  8. by   Q.
    If I were at that concert I woulda walked out too. I didn't pay to see their political point of view. Not to mention, their method of doing so was.....um...grotesque to say the least. And *******' scary. Yeesh. When will these entertainers learn?
  9. by   Mimi Wheeze
    Eddie's still not accepted that grunge is over. He has to do something for attention.
  10. by   oramar
    Interesting, two guys I thought were dead popped up on same day. Eddie Vedder and SH.
  11. by   SharonH, RN
    I am glad that Pearl Jam has the courage to express their feelings. In today's "Get 'em if they disagree atmosphere" that took a lot of backbone. It's too bad Madonna chickened out.
  12. by   Mimi Wheeze
    But Sharon, if you paid good money to buy a concert ticket, and the performer started spouting off pro/against something, wouldn't you be a little ticked? I'm positive those people in the audience were convinced they bought tickets to a concert, not a political rally.

    Backbone? I don't think it has to do with backbone. These entertainers hold thousands of fans "captive" when they use that microphone for anything other than performing.

    I've seen your opinions about this war. Even though you and I don't agree, we don't get the opportunity to spout our opinions into a microphone to thousands of people. What makes them think they have the right to? Because they are "entertainers?" Most of them are so coddled and sheltered, their opinions about reality are of no interest to me.
  13. by   Hardknox
    Someone else's opinion of Bush:

    Hurray For George W. Bush

    A lot has changed since George W. Bush became
    president--executive orders that support a "culture of
    life," judicial appointees who respect the constitution
    and members of the Cabinet who are unapologetic
    about their faith. But perhaps nothing more clearly
    represents the new leadership we enjoy as a country
    than that place Mr. Bush now calls his temporary
    home -1600 Pennsylvania Ave.





    The president is quick to point out that it is not his
    house but the American people's house. And, as
    such, he treats it and the people who work there
    with respect.

    From the Secret Service to the grounds crew, the
    folks who work at the White House rave about the
    First Family.

    The president and first lady prefer to entertain
    family friends in their private quarters rather
    than ask the stewards and waiters to negotiate
    difficult formal dining rooms.

    Harkening back to the days of Ronald Reagan,
    Bush will not allow any man to attend a meeting
    in the Oval Office without a jacket and tie. Gone
    are the days of blue jeans and pizza boxes.

    One of the clearest ways to show respect for someone
    is to respect their time. Everyone who works with and
    around the president has noted his punctuality.

    Meetings begin and end on time. This stands in
    stark contrast to the previous occupant of the
    White House, who was notorious for keeping
    visitors and the media waiting.

    And speaking of the former president, in his
    administration more than 500 staffers had access to
    the White House kitchen. One presidential aide said
    they turned it into a fast-food restaurant.

    These days, only 150 senior staff members have meal
    privileges. Of course the Clinton years were known for
    worse things than that. US News & World Report reported
    recently that it was common for President Clinton
    to have violent and sex-laden R-rated films playing
    on Air Force One. Even seasoned reporters would
    blush at the images being played out before their
    eyes while trying to question the president on some
    issue of national importance.

    A Marine who worked at Camp David publicly stated
    that pornography was littered all over the retreat.

    In contrast, President Bush has said that even some of
    the new major motion-picture releases, which are routinely
    sent to the White House for viewing by the First Family,
    are too vulgar for him.

    I've visited the White House twice since President
    Bush moved in. As anyone might be, I was awed by
    the history of the place. Oil portraits of past occupants
    reminded me that some presidents have understood
    the honor of living there and others have wantonly
    dishonored it. My visits with President Bush at the
    White House were an opportunity to witness first hand
    how much this man respects the office to which he was
    elected.

    He arrived at our meetings promptly and took
    the time to greet every person in attendance.
    He was warm and polite to each of us. His manner
    conveyed the message that he knew he was only a
    temporary resident and his job is to leave this August
    home in better shape than he found it.

    In one of my meetings, I made a point of speaking
    to a young man who is part of the military service
    assigned to the White House. His job is to escort
    guests and to help people find their way through
    the large hallways. His uniform was covered with
    ribbons and his shoes were perfectly polished. His
    face was emotionless and he drew no attention to
    himself, but for some reason he caught my eye.

    "Thank you," I said, "for the work you do. You really
    represent us all in your service here. It must be
    wonderful work." He paused and then allowed a
    big smile to cross his face. "Oh, yes, sir. It truly is."

    Yes, things certainly are different in Washington.

    Courtesy of: Rear Admiral Steve Brachet, USN (Ret)
    and Brigadier General Bob Clements, USAF (Ret)



    "All it will take for the forces of evil to rule the
    world ... is for enough good people to do nothing."
  14. by   Q.
    Originally posted by Mimi Wheeze
    But Sharon, if you paid good money to buy a concert ticket, and the performer started spouting off pro/against something, wouldn't you be a little ticked? I'm positive those people in the audience were convinced they bought tickets to a concert, not a political rally.

    .
    Sharon, I'm interested to know how you would have felt if you paid $80 for a concert and the entertainers were spouting off pro-war rhetoric at your expense. Would you still find them "courageous" or just expressing their views? Would you walk out?

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