Dean to announce bid for DNC chair

  1. Sources: Dean to announce bid for DNC chair


    (CNN) -- Former Vermont Gov. Howard Dean, whose high-flying presidential campaign crashed a year ago in the political chill of Iowa, is expected to announce Tuesday that he will run for the chairmanship of the Democratic National Committee, sources close to Dean told CNN.

    The announcement is expected at around 1 p.m. Tuesday, the sources said. Dean is expected to inform DNC members of his decision first, before it is posted on his blog and sent out to supporters via e-mail, the sources said.

    A bid by Dean has been expected, as he has been campaigning for the post for the past two months.

    Dean has said that he would not use the DNC chairmanship as a stepping stone for another presidential run in 2008.

    "I don't know that any Democrat is going to win for president in 2008 unless we make the changes that need to be made at the DNC," Dean said Saturday at a regional party event in Atlanta.

    Dean, 56, a medical doctor, served a decade as Vermont's chief executive before stepping down in 2002 to pursue what was considered a long-shot bid for the presidency.

    Fueled by an innovative Internet campaign and a dedicated cadre of supporters who came to be known as "Deaniacs," Dean drew a sharp distinction with his major rivals by steadfastly opposing the war in Iraq and surged to the top of the polls. He also raised more than $40 million, then a record for a Democratic primary campaign.

    But after finishing third in the Iowa caucuses, he gave a much-lampooned election night performance that came to be known as the "I have a scream" speech. Having poured his war chest into Iowa and New Hampshire, Dean was never able to recover.

    Dean will join six other candidates already in the DNC race: Former Reps. Tim Roemer of Indiana and Martin Frost of Texas; former Denver Mayor Wellington Webb; Simon Rosenberg, head of the centrist New Democratic Network; former Ohio Democratic state chairman David Leland; and Donnie Fowler, a veteran Democratic activist and campaign manager for retired Gen. Wesley Clark's presidential bid.

    Kate Michelman, former president of NARAL Pro-Choice America, a group that advocates for legalized abortion, has said she will decide this week whether to run for the DNC post.

    Abortion rights could become a hot issue with the entry into the race of Roemer, an abortion opponent. Phil Johnston, chairman of the Massachusetts Democratic Party, issued a statement Monday saying that he feels "strongly that a person who opposes a woman's right to choose should not chair the Democratic Party."

    "The fact that we lost the 2004 presidential race by a narrow margin should not result in the abandonment of our party's core principles," he said. "The notion that every woman across the nation should be able to control her own body is a basic principle that must be supported by the leadership of the party."

    Roemer said Saturday that if elected, he would not try "to steer the party to the right on abortion."

    DNC members will pick a successor to outgoing Chairman Terry McAuliffe at a meeting Feb. 12 in Washington, D.C.

    CNN's Steve Brusk contributed to this report.
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  2. 7 Comments

  3. by   BeachNurse
    This is good news, Tigerlily!
  4. by   Mkue
    I almost posted this earlier!

    Yes it is good news.

    Didn't Dean have a little trouble financing/budgeting his campaign before he dropped out? It might hurt his chances of being elected Chair.

    "The fact that we lost the 2004 presidential race by a narrow margin should not result in the abandonment of our party's core principles," he said. "The notion that every woman across the nation should be able to control her own body is a basic principle that must be supported by the leadership of the party."
    Narrow margin? um okay.
    And someone should tell the party that Roe vs. Wade is not in danger of being overturned, there is no need to put fear in women to get their vote.
  5. by   BeachNurse
    Quote from Tigerlily
    I almost posted this earlier!

    Yes it is good news.

    Didn't Dean have a little trouble financing/budgeting his campaign before he dropped out? It might hurt his chances of being elected Chair.



    Narrow margin? um okay.
    And someone should tell the party that Roe vs. Wade is not in danger of being overturned, there is no need to put fear in women to get their vote.
    Hmm maybe I did hear something about that.

    Anyway..GO DEAN!! YAHHHHHH!!!! YAHHHH!!!! YAHHHHHHH!!
  6. by   Mkue
    I have a feeling Dean won't get the job b/c I think the party really knows it must create a more moderate not too far left campaign. But they know that Dean can raise money and can also spend it well too. It will be interesting to see who wins the position.
  7. by   URO-RN
    Dean is such a hot head. I doubt if he gets to be chairperson. If the democrats want a chance in '08, they better not pick him. I'd hate to be one of his patients..imagine the wait to see him for a check-up. (assuming he still sees patients, of course)
  8. by   SmilingBluEyes
    well "YEEEEEEEEAHHHHHHAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA"

    rofl. I dont' think it will happen.
  9. by   BeachNurse
    Dean's DNC run picks up steam
    State party chairs back former presidential candidate


    (AP) -- Howard Dean won the backing of state Democratic Party leaders Monday, putting him in a strong position to win the chairmanship of the Democratic National Committee.

    "If all of our members vote for him, that will be half of what he needs to win the chairman's job," said Mark Brewer, chairman of the Association of State Democratic Chairs.

    The party's presidential front-runner in 2003 won 56 votes from the state chairs and Democratic activist Donnie Fowler won 21 during a national conference call. The state chairs ignored a recommendation made Sunday by the executive committee to back Fowler. Other candidates' support Monday was in single digits.

    "We're asking all of our state chairs and vice chairs to follow our endorsements," Brewer said, noting that would bring 112 votes. "And we think they will."

    The former Vermont governor will bring changes the state parties have asked for, said Brewer. Dean revolutionized Democratic politics in the 2004 presidential campaign with his use of the Internet, organizing strategy and his ability to energize new voters.

    "Strengthening the state parties is a central part of our plan to make the Democratic Party competitive in every race, in every district, in every state and territory," said Dean, who said his campaign to win the post continues. "If elected DNC Chair, we will make this vision a reality."

    Dean already had about 50 endorsements of DNC members, including five chairs. He needs a majority of the 447 members to win the post. The election is scheduled Feb. 12.

    Some in the party have worried aloud about Dean, saying he may be too outspoken and too blunt on occasion to provide effective leadership. But as Dean's campaign gained ground, Democratic resistance has seemed to fade.

    Last week, longtime activist Harold Ickes said he would back Dean, saying he concluded that Dean had more of the attributes needed to run the party than any of the other candidates.

    Organized labor is considering whether to back a candidate and could revitalize the race by choosing one of Dean's opponents. But Democrats watching that situation have said it's unclear whether the AFL-CIO will endorse a single candidate. Former Texas Rep. Martin Frost has been counting heavily on labor support to gain strength against Dean.

    Dean's fast-moving campaign appeared to be detoured Sunday when the chairs' executive committee backed Fowler. But the chairs on their national conference call disregarded that recommendation.

    Fowler, 37, has worked on campaigns in more than a dozen states and is the son of former Democratic National Committee chairman Donald Fowler of South Carolina.

    Dean, a former Vermont governor, had already gotten the backing of state party chairs in Vermont, Washington state, Florida, Oklahoma and Mississippi. He also has the backing of dozens of other DNC members.

    Seven candidates are in the running for the chairman's job, including Dean, Fowler, Frost, Democratic activist Simon Rosenberg, former Denver Mayor Wellington Webb, former Indiana Rep. Tim Roemer and former Ohio party chair David Leland.

    Frost got five votes from the state chairs, Rosenberg got three, Roemer got three and Webb got three.

    Find this article at:
    http://www.cnn.com/2005/ALLPOLITICS/....ap/index.html

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